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Soul Street - New Club Soul LP - funky side of northern soul

Soul Street - New Club Soul LP - funky side of northern soul magazine cover

Details of a new vinyl comp lp release from Club Soul, info, preview and blurb follow below

CLUB SOUL presents an eclectic blend of hard-edged Northern Soul from the funky side of the street. It’s time to pass the hatchet instead of the talc and trade in the spin and slide for the hook and sling and work that dancefloor!

NORTHERN SOUL continues to evolve, which is perhaps why, some fifty years on, its appeal is so enduring. At its epicentre is the traditional, Motown inspired, Sixties oldie that proliferates many Club Soul albums, but in more recent times we’ve seen a resurgence of soul-tinged R&B, Crossover, the Sweeter end of Northern Soul and even the influence of the Low-Rider scene. And, if you thought that Northern Soul production ended in 1969, think again, check out the contemporary sounds of Carlton Jumel Smith, Durand Jones And The Indications, Ernest Ernie & The Sincerities, Decosta Boyce, Curtis Harding and many many more... exciting times!

Here we showcase the funky side of Northern Soul which seems to have captured the imagination of our soul brothers and sisters across Europe and a growing number of progressive clubs in the U.K. Not quite rare groove, nor Seventies Modern, these 14 rare soul gems are hard-edged, kitchen-sink rhythms that demand dance floor attention.

Our eclectic blend borrows its name from our title track “Soul Street” by Ricky Allen, a super rare cut written and produced by Mel London and released to absolutely no acclaim on his Chicago based Tam-Boo label circa 1968. Allen is no stranger to the rare soul scene and is joined here by a number of familiar faces such as our southern soulsters Alder Ray Black and Eddie Bo and our hit artists Betty Harris, Tina Turner and Aaron Neville. Special attention must go to Josephine Taylor and Alvin Cash both of whom contribute tracks, that incredibly, were unreleased at the time of recording! But our star turn has to be Lenny McDaniel who makes his compilation debut with the furious dancer “Something Out Of Nothing” recorded with The New Era in 1968 for Joe Banashak’s Seven B label. Everything happens on Soul Street.

Side One

Ricky Allen - Soul Street

Alder Ray Black And The Fame Gang - Put Your Trust In Me (You Can Depend On Me)

Eddie Bo & Inez Cheatham - Lover and a Friend

Betty Harris - Trouble With My Lover

Josephine Taylor - I Want A Man

Willie West - Fairchild

Lee Moses - I Can't Take No Chances

Side Two

Lenny McDaniel & The New Era - Something Out Of Nothing

Alvin Cash & The Registers - Sweatin' (Do What You Want To)

Roger & The Gypsies - Pass the Hatchet (Part 1)

Roy Roberts Experience - You Move Me, PT. 1

Net Wt. 14 Karat Black - Ain't Nothin' But a Habit

Tina Turner with Ike Turner & The Kings of Rhythm - You Got What You Wanted

Aaron Neville - Hercules

Northern Soul reissue series from Charly Records. Club Soul is managed, marketed, distributed and fulfilled by Snapper Music,

https://www.clubsoul.club/SOUL-STREET-LP-p161720757

 

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  • Up vote 1



Source Magazine Comments

Tomangoes

Posted

Individually there's some great tunes here.

Played one after the other at a northern soul night, it will clear the dance floor.

Ed

Individually there's some great tunes here.

Played one after the other at a northern soul night, it will clear the dance floor.

Ed

  • Up vote 1
Tlscapital

Posted

48 minutes ago, Tomangoes said:

Individually there's some great tunes here.

Played one after the other at a northern soul night, it will clear the dance floor.

Ed

Individually there's some great tunes here.

Played one after the other at a northern soul night, it will clear the dance floor.

Ed

Hopefully a vinyl compilation, when done with taste and some 'representative' tunes that don't have the favor from all on the "scene", is a much smarter move as they aim anyway to those who can't afford the 45's yet still want to hear, discover and 'educate' their ear to "new" sounds as well.

For those reasons I always favored my Kent compilations (pre N°50) as a 'beginner' and always had a dedicated dislike for the Inferno see through comp vinyl and cover with that 'tainted love' tune lasting 15 minutes and on the flip the house party pre-mixed job of too few "good" ol' classics.

Onto which all was made as an artifact for the kids 'house party'. Here now I think it's a rather fair selection they did there. Maybe a tad too much on the 'safe' side of things. But I'm not concerned by comps anymore. Still it's good to see younger ones going for them and buzzing on about tunes :)

  • Up vote 1
Seano

Posted

Really interesting compilation. I have to agree with @Tomangoes that if played back to back it would be likely to clear the floor. To be honest, I feel like that about all genres of NS - love stompers and classics, love modern, reggae influenced, low rider, brand new, funky and probably several other strands that I don't even realise have a name. I'd enjoy across the board being within a DJ's set, rather than one style for an hour, followed by something different for the next etc. As @Tlscapital says, the Kent albums have been a great source to broaden your tastes, certainly opened my ears to a massive amount of stuff I didn't at the time know.

That said - a very good album, and the Lee Moses track sounds great!

 

  • Up vote 1


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