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Paul Anka... Cant Help Loving You

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who discovered this masterpiece,as its not a name you link to northern soul / soul music ...who decided to pick up a Paul Anka record and thought this might be soulful...lets be honest you would probably just ignore any Paul Anka record if looking for something soulful.....i know we have such strange songs / artists on the scene...but after any info on Mr.Anka...thanks...

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I remember this as being an Ian Levine discovery, covered up at first I think. This was before Richard Searling worked for RCA.

Agree that the other names on the record would make it worth a play.

Rick

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Played at the Catacombs, late 1973, credited to Johnny Caswell, probably because "You don't love me anymore" was big around the same time. Pep played it off an Emidisc.

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Isn't it credited to R Searling on the Jumping At The Go GO album cover notes? I'm sure I read somewhere that when he uncovered it, people still didn't believe him it was Paul Anka. Or did I just dream that?

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Played at the Catacombs, late 1973, credited to Johnny Caswell, probably because "You don't love me anymore" was big around the same time. Pep played it off an Emidisc.

Didn't know it was pre-Wigan.Live and learn.!! Always was under impression RS acquired it through his RCA connection.Seems as though SS had it first,but RS made it what it is.Was covered when i first went to Wigan,the uncovered not long after ( to almost :wink: everyone's suprise,including mine.)

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This record was played back in the day because it had a certain sound which the early dj,s were looking for regardless of wether it was a soul record or not and regardless of who the singer was........that is why back then we were fed so many god awful pop tunes,this being one of em..........it,s most definately not about the artist singing a soul record.......just a certain type of sound......by the way it,s poop

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JM post is below and yes it was first played out as Johnny Caswell

circa 1973 Simon Soussan was in Providence Rhode Island and visited one of the world's leading knowledge's on music. A hermit called Al Pavlow one of the most interesting and fabulous people I've ever met whilst looking for records. He had a shop at the time and Soussan came in..he was the very first European record collector Al had evermet.

Al had the most fabulous stock of 45s you could ever dream of. Soussan went bonkers, flying through his 45s pulling records and every so often playing a few.

Al was totally fascinated by this, he'd never seen such enthusiasm and when he looked at his "keepers" he still couldn't work out what it was all about. So Al asked him what the hell he was looking for.. Soussan said I want records that sound like this! He played him 20 seconds of The Sequins on Renfro, then the Soul Twins - Quick Change Artist..

Al looked at him and said .."I've got a Paul Anka record you'd like.. Soussan just looked at him like he was a cretin and continued to rip into the masses of 45s...about 15 minutes later the shop speakers SHOOOOK!! To the opening bars of "I Can't Help Loving You".. Soussan apparently dropped all the records he was holdin all over the floor and sprinted to the counter.. "What the F**K is this !!**#!!

Al looked at him with a wry smile on his face.."It's the Paul Anka record I told I said you might like!"

How good was Al at his job? When I met him in 1977 I went to his house armed with the matrix # "stole" by an obnlookers quick glance off Richard Searling's biggest Wigan Casino cover-up of the time. "Al all I got is this # can you help" showing him K14072 it took him about a minute to come back with a copy of Wakefield Sun - Trypt on love.. the Eddie Jason cover-up was uncovered by Big Al of Rhode Island.

I wonder if big Al didn't pull Paul Anka and play it, would it be undiscovered today..just waiting for a flukey spin by a soul collector..but what soul collector would ever play a Paul Anka 45?

Edited by john manship, 25 September 2006 - 09:16 AM.

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Searling.RCA links.

He didn't work for RCA until 4 years after this was discovered, it's a Mecca or Catacombs record, 72-73 discovery

* sorry posted before read all replies saying the same thing

Edited by Pete S

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He didn't work for RCA until 4 years after this was discovered, it's a Mecca or Catacombs record, 72-73 discovery

* sorry posted before read all replies saying the same thing

He didn't work for RCA until 4 years after this was discovered, it's a Mecca or Catacombs record, 72-73 discovery

* sorry posted before read all replies saying the same thing

Just goes to show what i thought i knew bitd.Can't remember being told 72-73.So RS didn't work for Rca until 76? Anyway,what a record .!!

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I remember this as being an Ian Levine discovery, covered up at first I think. This was before Richard Searling worked for RCA.

Agree that the other names on the record would make it worth a play.

Rick

Didn't this come from his first big haul from a Florida thrift warehouse nearly all demos if I remember right

Mark

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This record was played back in the day because it had a certain sound which the early dj,s were looking for regardless of wether it was a soul record or not and regardless of who the singer was........that is why back then we were fed so many god awful pop tunes,this being one of em..........it,s most definately not about the artist singing a soul record.......just a certain type of sound......by the way it,s poop

. . . in your opinion. Absolute class Northern Soul to me.

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A friend of ours (Carl Wong) bought this from Soussans list, (I'm guessing early '73-definately pre Wigan anyway)-under it's still cover up name Johnny Caswell, when it arrived the labels had been ripped off...

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Without doubt it is a great record and it created a stampede to the floor when it was played back in the day. I remember one week when it was Johnny Caswell, then the next week at the Casino it was announced as Paul Anka, the floor was still packed.

I loved it then and love it now, in fact it is playing on my turntable and it sounds great. (USA RCA Demo Copy of course!, i will buy a black stock copy one day)

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Thats just it..........it ain,t soul it,s 60's popular music.........northern pop if ya like :thumbsup::D

Technically, you are right Gordon, but I disagree, might not be soul... per say, but CHYL is Northern IMO, you can't re-write history & it was big & better than the ranks of some of 'pop' that was being banded about at that time, same goes for 'When We Get There' IMO.

And are you going apply that argument to tons of blue eyed stuff, I could give a list longer than the Magna Carta you could apply that too & say it's not soul? To name a record that got me into soul when I was a kid, Night Owl, Bobby Paris.....is that not northern then?

Caught a John Manship guest spot last year, couldn't believe the amount of Blue Eyed white stuff.....Tony Middleton, Rufus Lumley..I was very surprised with his set, but my point is, its all Northern.

Don't want to argue with you Gordon, but do dissagree with your post.

Aid.

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Personally dont think pigment matters. If its Northern its Northern. If you think about the really popular oldies that have stood the test of time they tend to appeal to more mainstream music lovers as well.

Epitome of Sound I think were white BUT it was HUGE, and my rock loving 16 year old and Pop loving partner at 52 appreciate it. I find that popular tunes like Mel Britt,Epitome,Yvonne Baker,Paul Anka, Ruby Andrews et al also do the trick. They have simple reptitive lyrics, easy to like ( which is why we danced to them way back in the 70,s) BUT more hard core stompers like Twans, Cecil Washington etc dont switch on the light at all. Yet give Lesley the Isleys My love from the LP and we are in business.

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Personally dont think pigment matters. If its Northern its Northern. If you think about the really popular oldies that have stood the test of time they tend to appeal to more mainstream music lovers as well.

Epitome of Sound I think were white BUT it was HUGE, and my rock loving 16 year old and Pop loving partner at 52 appreciate it. I find that popular tunes like Mel Britt,Epitome,Yvonne Baker,Paul Anka, Ruby Andrews et al also do the trick. They have simple reptitive lyrics, easy to like ( which is why we danced to them way back in the 70,s) BUT more hard core stompers like Twans, Cecil Washington etc dont switch on the light at all. Yet give Lesley the Isleys My love from the LP and we are in business.

That's what I'm sayin (or trying rather badly too).......

Aid.

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Personally dont think pigment matters. If its Northern its Northern. If you think about the really popular oldies that have stood the test of time they tend to appeal to more mainstream music lovers as well.

Epitome of Sound I think were white BUT it was HUGE, and my rock loving 16 year old and Pop loving partner at 52 appreciate it. I find that popular tunes like Mel Britt,Epitome,Yvonne Baker,Paul Anka, Ruby Andrews et al also do the trick. They have simple reptitive lyrics, easy to like ( which is why we danced to them way back in the 70,s) BUT more hard core stompers like Twans, Cecil Washington etc dont switch on the light at all. Yet give Lesley the Isleys My love from the LP and we are in business.

I agree. It may not be classed as Soul, depending on your parameters, but a Northern Soul record it definately was, and it hit the spot for many back in the day, as did When We Get There.

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Technically, you are right Gordon, but I disagree, might not be soul... per say, but CHYL is Northern IMO, you can't re-write history & it was big & better than the ranks of some of 'pop' that was being banded about at that time, same goes for 'When We Get There' IMO.

And are you going apply that argument to tons of blue eyed stuff, I could give a list longer than the Magna Carta you could apply that too & say it's not soul? To name a record that got me into soul when I was a kid, Night Owl, Bobby Paris.....is that not northern then?

Caught a John Manship guest spot last year, couldn't believe the amount of Blue Eyed white stuff.....Tony Middleton, Rufus Lumley..I was very surprised with his set, but my point is, its all Northern.

Don't want to argue with you Gordon, but do dissagree with your post.

Aid.

Whilst l get your gist.....you're missing something.......if back in the 70's you drove a clapped out mini as l did lol and thought it was the bees knees and l loved it...with the fullness of time l know that my old mini was not very good really.The same is applied to these pop records (we may like em,we may love em) but they ain,t what we thought they were back in the day....if a lot of em got their first outing nowadays a lot of em would bomb real quick. It,s nostalgia that elevates em. It,s not the colour of the artists skin..ie dusty springfield got her influence from motown Danny wagner was a recognised soul singer......these other tunes were just created in that 60's sound that was popular to sell (nowt wrong with that).....people need to recognise em for what they are. pop tunes.....and l don,t like em..........it,s also funny that the dare l say oldies crowd hold on to em for dear life whilst rejecting loads of fine uptempo 60's dancing soul.......they are also happy to immediately accept pop records like joe jampot and joey delorenzo.........maybe underneath they just love pop music lol :):thumbsup:

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Yeah, of course, I do get your gist Gordon.

I understand what you say & actually agree and do feel the same about a lot of the music.

I don't like a lot of those pop tracks too, coupled with the fact that tastes change.

But suppose my real point was that, it is was what it was & we can't change that now, doesn't mean we can't move on & be progressive, not in mine (& most of my friends cases) anyways. :thumbsup:

Aid.

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Whilst l get your gist.....you're missing something.......if back in the 70's you drove a clapped out mini as l did lol and thought it was the bees knees and l loved it...with the fullness of time l know that my old mini was not very good really.The same is applied to these pop records (we may like em,we may love em) but they ain,t what we thought they were back in the day....if a lot of em got their first outing nowadays a lot of em would bomb real quick. It,s nostalgia that elevates em. It,s not the colour of the artists skin..ie dusty springfield got her influence from motown Danny wagner was a recognised soul singer......these other tunes were just created in that 60's sound that was popular to sell (nowt wrong with that).....people need to recognise em for what they are. pop tunes.....and l don,t like em..........it,s also funny that the dare l say oldies crowd hold on to em for dear life whilst rejecting loads of fine uptempo 60's dancing soul.......they are also happy to immediately accept pop records like joe jampot and joey delorenzo.........maybe underneath they just love pop music lol :):thumbsup:

I guess that is the "purist" viewpoint, and an absolutely valid statement. But you can't knock someone for enjoying a sound then or now surely?

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I think I've posted this before. The phrase "driving Detroit Beat" certainly gives the impression that RCA wanted this to be viewed as a soul record.

Ah, I was about to use that term Godz! My view, after many years hindsight and insight is that CHLY is not a soul record. It does however have that driving beat and is a good dance record - I've had some great times dancing to this. It is far better than some of the other steaming dog turd type records which were played back then.

Peter

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Ah, I was about to use that term Godz! My view, after many years hindsight and insight is that CHLY is not a soul record. It does however have that driving beat and is a good dance record - I've had some great times dancing to this. It is far better than some of the other steaming dog turd type records which were played back then.

Peter

It's one of the best white Northern records of it's type for sure Peter.

Sure as hell beats Jimmy Breedlove's version too - and he is black. It seems then that the singer's colour is less important than the arrangement with regard to what makes Paul Anka's cut a great record.

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Simon Soussan discovered it in late 1973 and it was supplied on acetate to Russ, myself and Richard with the name Johnny Caswell.

It took off like a rocket around Dec 73/Jan 74 time and gave us a clear exclusive over the Mecca, which at that time, Wigan certainly needed.

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Guest giant

Technically, you are right Gordon, but I disagree, might not be soul... per say, but CHYL is Northern IMO, you can't re-write history & it was big & better than the ranks of some of 'pop' that was being banded about at that time, same goes for 'When We Get There' IMO.

And are you going apply that argument to tons of blue eyed stuff, I could give a list longer than the Magna Carta you could apply that too & say it's not soul? To name a record that got me into soul when I was a kid, Night Owl, Bobby Paris.....is that not northern then?

Caught a John Manship guest spot last year, couldn't believe the amount of Blue Eyed white stuff.....Tony Middleton, Rufus Lumley..I was very surprised with his set, but my point is, its all Northern.

Don't want to argue with you Gordon, but do dissagree with your post.

Aid.

Tony Middleton is black and a great soul singer

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Personally dont think pigment matters. If its Northern its Northern. If you think about the really popular oldies that have stood the test of time they tend to appeal to more mainstream music lovers as well.

Epitome of Sound I think were white BUT it was HUGE, and my rock loving 16 year old and Pop loving partner at 52 appreciate it. I find that popular tunes like Mel Britt,Epitome,Yvonne Baker,Paul Anka, Ruby Andrews et al also do the trick. They have simple reptitive lyrics, easy to like ( which is why we danced to them way back in the 70,s) BUT more hard core stompers like Twans, Cecil Washington etc dont switch on the light at all. Yet give Lesley the Isleys My love from the LP and we are in business.

The vocalist in the Epitome of Sound was African - American.

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Guest turntableterra

Played well before Richard had links with RCA. Played, covered up as Johnny Caswell early 74 at Wigan. May have had a couple of plays before.

Paul

yes johnny caswell

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I think I've posted this before. The phrase "driving Detroit Beat" certainly gives the impression that RCA wanted this to be viewed as a soul record.

post-1918-12553707797987_thumb.jpg

Makes you wonder why the mystery about the record and its discovery when RCA put an advert in the music press describing it as 'that drivin' Detroit beat' !!!!

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Makes you wonder why the mystery about the record and its discovery when RCA put an advert in the music press describing it as 'that drivin' Detroit beat' !!!!

Also says "Hard Rocking"..........and old paul certainly has that moody elvis presley look going on

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Didn't this come from his first big haul from a Florida thrift warehouse nearly all demos if I remember right

Mark

Mark

If the Florida thrift shop haul was when stuff like Lee David , George Carrow, Lada Edmund turned up , I think Paul Anka was just before these, but the general consensus is that ICHLV is a Soussan/ Wigan play but I'm not convinced. Ian definitely played it and Soussan wouldn't send a record to Levine. Also Levine tended to play different stuff to Wigan and I thought it was known prior to Wigan. Maybe a trawl through back issues of Blues and Soul could come up with the answer.

As to the original question of why play a Paul Anka record when looking for a potential Northern track is probably because some people have said that almost every recording artist active in the US during mid 65 to late 66 recorded a "northern" track. From ageing rockers, country crooners, swinging jazzers, old doo woppers and Italian pretty boys, all were possible candidates. Hence tracks by Elvis Presley Gene Pitney, Ella Fitzgerald, Charlie Rich and Mel Torme to name a few, got exposure. It was usually the producer, arranger , musicians and song writers who gave the record a northern sound. The singers, as they were often told, were entirely inter changeable. I'm sure many artists could have done I Can't Help Loving You just as well using the same track. Charles Calello was certainly a name I was looking for in the search for new tracks, Others were Herb Bernstein and Bob Crewe on pop artists and Horace Ott , George Kerr, James Carmichael, Mike Terry and loads of others on soul artists. Even a well known northern act needed the right names on the label.

Rick

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