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Tonite - Northern Soul Bbc Living For The Weekend

All About the SOUL Mike

 
Posted

I notice that even the recent Northern soul book only devoted about <20% of its content on post Wigan.

I think it's fair to say that the clubs of the 80s and 90s didn't really do anything structurally different from what had gone before. The form and format of the scene and the associated rituals and ethics evolved in the preceding decades. That's the major issue in documenting the post-Wigan years. The roots and the evolution are very interesting. Finding something structural to say about the scene post-'85 is difficult. It just becomes a list of venues, records and DJs. Yes, there will be great anecdotes on the social side of things, but that's for a different book really.

 

Obviously there were dozens of allnighters in these years, tens of thousands of punters and hundreds of DJs. Ranking the importance of those clubs and jocks will always be subjective.

 

From my point of view in writing the book one thing became apparent. By the time Stafford closed it was becoming very difficult to run a big allnighter where the main musical diet was composed of newly-discovered records of whatever vintage. At that point–1985-86–the scene fragmented and became based very much on parochial or local scenes again. Of course people travelled, but not in the way they had done to the big 1970s allnighters: i.e. regularly and fervently in large numbers.

 

A critical point in the musical timeline was when the balance between Oldies and Newies became weighted overwhelmingly in favour of the former. After Stafford closed it became unusual to attend a venue where each DJ exclusively played sets of newly-discovered NS records. 

 

Yes, great records were still found (and continue to be 'till this day), but the idea of one central venue based on newies where the bulk of the scene congregates in very large numbers on a regular basis was pretty much gone forever.

 

Maybe the Torch and the Casino were exceptions in the historical timeline, not the norm. Rare Soul started in dingy cellar-type clubs, so maybe the concept of a 2,000 capacity venue in a huge, high-ceilinged ballroom was the anomaly.

 

Food for thought.

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Posted

 

 

We're going to get that timeline drawn up so it's along the lines of a 'Family Tree' of clubs since 1968........

 

Ian D :)

 

 

Might be an idea to run it by people on here first.

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Posted

John's pretty media-adverse so I'm not so sure he'd have done it to be fair.

 

Watch out for Richard Searling's interview with John Anderson on the forthcoming box set "The Odyssey: A Northern Soul Time Capsule 1968-2014". The full interview was 2 hours and is currently being edited. It's great!

 

Ian D :D  

Does the box set include the over three decades of northern soul in europe and other parts of the world ???

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The structural changes came maybe towards the end of the 1990s. Big weekenders, the returnee phenomenon, the internet, international pockets of Northern appreciation etc.

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Posted (edited)

I think it's fair to say that the clubs of the 80s and 90s didn't really do anything structurally different from what had gone before. The form and format of the scene and the associated rituals and ethics evolved in the preceding decades. That's the major issue in documenting the post-Wigan years. The roots and the evolution are very interesting. Finding something structural to say about the scene post-'85 is difficult. It just becomes a list of venues, records and DJs. Yes, there will be great anecdotes on the social side of things, but that's for a different book really.

 

 

.

 

Food for thought.

 

Defo food for thought Gareth.

 

I'd say something critical did happen mid to late 80s that would be interesting to some at least.

 

The structure of much of the music changed ever so slightly. The Beat Ballad became more prominent in most of the headline DJ acts. Things that might have been deemed 'too slow' etc became the 'now' sound.

While there were tracks like Ray Pollard - The Drifter, I dont think that the sheer volume of slower mid tempo tracks had ever filled sets by the more popular DJs.

With this change in tempo, the dancing changed as well. Maybe because there were less teenagers, and maybe because the Hip Hip/Breakdance scene had userped many of the dancers who liked to do acrobatics. But IMO less and less of the latest discoveries saw people leaping about the floor on their hands etc. (One of the London crowd once said to me he could tell I went to Stafford as I have a little 'move' that he reckons was popular there. Its not a concious thing)

 

IMO the change in style of dancing has helped the longevity. It would take a lot to get a room full of 50+ and 60+ year olds back dropping to 30 tracks a night. Not handfulls of Green and Clears, more, buckets of cod liver

 

Add to that the Latin 'explosion', the ever more numbers of RnB faves from the sepearte mod scene (ie Charles Sheffield) and you get a feeling about how Northern Soul hasn't stood still.

Edited by in town Mikey

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Why do we always have to have some 'has been' celebrity twat included in everything aired on TV these days?

I'm not saying Waterman, Blackburn, Stringfellow or Almond had no input, knowledge or influence on the Northern Soul scene but would they have been included had they not been 'celebrity'? I doubt it.

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I have to disagree with your timeline Gareth.  The venues I was travelling to into the 90's were still predominately newies based.  85/86 certainly wasn't the turning point, not in my opinion.  

 

85 into 86 saw the emergence of Butch for one with some truly awesome sets consisting o practically all newies.  You also had Jimmy Wensiora, Rob Marriott, Guy still heavily featuring newies, Kitch, Colin Law, Gary Spencer, Carl Fortnum, Steve Smith and others at venues like Allanton, Mexborough, Blackburn, Winding Wheel, Bradford, Bretby Soul Nights early 90's and others i could list.

 

I would say the turning point began with Keele, massive room, practically oldies influenced, beginning of the end for me and the dumbing down of the scene.

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Posted (edited)

What you say is true Chalks, but none of those venues were as ambitious, numbers-wise, as Stafford had been. That's why I think of it as a kind of cut-off point.

 

The sounds could become big, word of mouth things to an in-crowd, but how many have truly permeated the bigger consciousness of the scene (if such a thing has existed)?

 

A load of people still don't recognise The Mello Souls for chrissakes!

Edited by garethx

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Another food for thought question - why was Stafford the focal point of the scene for several years?

 

Yes, other clubs were running regularly during the same period and getting similar numbers through the doors (let us not forget that Stafford was half empty quite a bit of the time!)...plus the DJs were all working other clubs as well.

 

Geographical location, the venue itself, the vibe...what was it...for me it was a combination of all the aforementioned...may be time for a different thread!?

:hatsoff2:

 

(Not knowing the Mello Souls in this day and age is a major Soul-sin...it's been the biggest thing since sliced bread since 1986!)

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Why do we always have to have some 'has been' celebrity twat included in everything aired on TV these days?

I'm not saying Waterman, Blackburn, Stringfellow or Almond had no input, knowledge or influence on the Northern Soul scene but would they have been included had they not been 'celebrity'? I doubt it.

 

Good point...the producers were simply not brave enough to have no mainstream celebs within their programme...including some more scene characters would have made it just as intriguing, genuine and believable...may be?!

:g:

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In a word Dave, branding.

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What you say is true Chalks, but none of those venues were as ambitious, numbers-wise, as Stafford had been. That's why I think of it as a kind of cut-off point.

 

The sounds could become big, word of mouth things to an in-crowd, but how many have truly permeated the bigger consciousness of the scene (if such a thing has existed)?

 

A load of people still don't recognise The Mello Souls for chrissakes!

 

Again I have to disagree, even after Stafford you still had pretty much the same crowd everywhere, from the 100 Club in the South to Shotts in the North, with healthy numbers too.  That crowd remained as far as was concerned until the early 90's when some began to drift away disillusioned with the backward steps the scene was taking and other outside pressures, family and work for example not to mention e health of some. Venues promoting newies still remained, Betby, Bradford, The Griffin, the Wilton but not in the vein the 80's produced. As I said Keele for me was the turning point.  Word of mouth still existed, everywhere I went was word of mouth, you had to travel to hear the biggies and travel we did irrespective of what some think.

 

Not knowing the Mello Souls is all down to the dumbing down of the scene and the backward steps it took in the early 90's. 

 

But much of is argument/debate is subjective and this is simply as I saw it.

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I think if you're in the middle of the scene–promoting, collecting, DJing, or just dancing–it's always exciting. That's its strength but also maybe a weakness. It's easy to become myopic.

 

Looking at the bigger picture and trying to pick out what was momentous, or of lasting cultural value can be more difficult.

 

The book was really written for a wider audience, as it had to be. It was published by the biggest publisher in the world. The focus was to be a tie-in with the film and the hope was that the film would introduce people to NS. I hope that didn't mean a dumbing down. I tried to write it for people who had a wider interest in music and cultural history. It was written in a hurry (less than two months from start to finish) so the list of people I could interview was limited.

 

I think there is scope for a more intimate portrayal of the scene, for consumption within the scene alone. That would be more comprehensive and more nuanced, but it will take a hell of a lot longer to research and write.

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I think if you're in the middle of the scene–promoting, collecting, DJing, or just dancing–it's always exciting. That's its strength but also maybe a weakness. It's easy to become myopic.

 

Looking at the bigger picture and trying to pick out what was momentous, or of lasting cultural value can be more difficult.

 

The book was really written for a wider audience, as it had to be. It was published by the biggest publisher in the world. The focus was to be a tie-in with the film and the hope was that the film would introduce people to NS. I hope that didn't mean a dumbing down. I tried to write it for people who had a wider interest in music and cultural history. It was written in a hurry (less than two months from start to finish) so the list of people I could interview was limited.

 

I think there is scope for a more intimate portrayal of the scene, for consumption within the scene alone. That would be more comprehensive and more nuanced, but it will take a hell of a lot longer to research and write.

Gareth your book covered post Wigan far more than any other media. You may have written it in a hurry but for me it's the best on the subject. I can't think of any other book that covered it, beyond perhaps a token mention at best of the 100 club and Stafford. I'm guessing as the authors didn't have the drive or perhaps knowledge to touch on the 80s. 

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Agree. Missing out Stafford and the 100 Club, having done the founding clubs in a fairly balanced way without too much Wigan, was a mistake.

It went Wigan closes ... The new generation saves the scene ...

Lost it towards the end but really enjoyed it and think it was good entertainment and sufficient detail for non-soul folk that could get people interested.

I liked the look at the cheesy media angles - Wigans Ovation etc.

Northern Soul is cool is the take home message for me

Cheers

Richard

Agreed. I'm one of the so called 'new generation'. After listening to some of the stuff played at Stafford, IMHO, I think it's amongst the best. Soul brothers Inc - pyramid, Ree Flores - look into my heart. And loads more, open to suggestions though!

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Agree. Missing out Stafford and the 100 Club, having done the founding clubs in a fairly balanced way without too much Wigan, was a mistake.

It went Wigan closes ... The new generation saves the scene ...

Lost it towards the end but really enjoyed it and think it was good entertainment and sufficient detail for non-soul folk that could get people interested.

I liked the look at the cheesy media angles - Wigans Ovation etc.

Northern Soul is cool is the take home message for me

Cheers

Richard

Agreed. I'm one of the so called 'new generation'. After listening to some of the stuff played at Stafford, IMHO, I think it's amongst the best. Soul brothers Inc - pyramid, Ree Flores - look into my heart. And loads more, open to suggestions though!

They got it Chronologically incorrect with Mecca coming after Wigan and then a massive gap from 1980 approx. till today no mention of Stafford 100 club and other major venues that kept the scene going but overall was enjoyable. Oh Ian D well done ! and the plug for the new film ( Surprise Surprise)!

They got it Chronologically incorrect with Mecca coming after Wigan and then a massive gap from 1980 approx. till today no mention of Stafford 100 club and other major venues that kept the scene going but overall was enjoyable. Oh Ian D well done ! and the plug for the new film ( Surprise Surprise)!

Have you read the Northern Soul book, an illustrated history? When I read it, I found the stuff about Stafford and the 100 club to be very interesting, I wasn't there, so I can't confirm how accurate it is. But those who I know who did go to Stafford seem to vouch for it!

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Defo food for thought Gareth.

 

I'd say something critical did happen mid to late 80s that would be interesting to some at least.

 

The structure of much of the music changed ever so slightly. The Beat Ballad became more prominent in most of the headline DJ acts. Things that might have been deemed 'too slow' etc became the 'now' sound.

While there were tracks like Ray Pollard - The Drifter, I dont think that the sheer volume of slower mid tempo tracks had ever filled sets by the more popular DJs.

With this change in tempo, the dancing changed as well. Maybe because there were less teenagers, and maybe because the Hip Hip/Breakdance scene had userped many of the dancers who liked to do acrobatics. But IMO less and less of the latest discoveries saw people leaping about the floor on their hands etc. (One of the London crowd once said to me he could tell I went to Stafford as I have a little 'move' that he reckons was popular there. Its not a concious thing)

 

IMO the change in style of dancing has helped the longevity. It would take a lot to get a room full of 50+ and 60+ year olds back dropping to 30 tracks a night. Not handfulls of Green and Clears, more, buckets of cod liver

 

Add to that the Latin 'explosion', the ever more numbers of RnB faves from the sepearte mod scene (ie Charles Sheffield) and you get a feeling about how Northern Soul hasn't stood still.

Was speaking to my old man on Saturday night, he was telling me he sold a record to get to the last all night at Wigan, turned out it was a copy of Ray Pollards, The Drifter on uk United Artists, with the serial number 0001, think he's feeling a bit sour about that now!

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In a word Dave, branding.

 

What do you mean by branding?

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What do you mean by branding?

Stafford created a buzz. The things that went on there caused a stir. As people have pointed out other venues which ran at the same time had similar numbers through the door, but Stafford was the venue everyone talked about. Certain figures were evangelical about it–not necessarily the promoters themselves–and it was the talk of the scene. That was down to the characters involved. Think how passionate Pete Lawson and others were about some of what was going on there.

 

When doing the book one of the factors I used to decide whether to focus on a particular venue was whether you saw the name against records on lists: "Big at the Wheel", "Torch classic", "Mecca secret sound" or whatever.

 

For whatever reason Stafford was the place in the 80s which got this reputation, even though many of the records played there had been tried at other venues. I think of Tony Galla or Tommy Navarro and know that Keb and Guy played records like these at other venues before they ever got on at Stafford. Pat Brady was obviously doing everywhere, yet it's Stafford that we associate his big sounds with. We seldom see "Morecambe classic" or "Huge at Hinckley" to anything like the same degree, although those venues were popular too. 

 

Branding, whether conscious or not, plays a big part in that.

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Posted (edited)

Was speaking to my old man on Saturday night, he was telling me he sold a record to get to the last all night at Wigan, turned out it was a copy of Ray Pollards, The Drifter on uk United Artists, with the serial number 0001, think he's feeling a bit sour about that now!

 

Think he's shitting you as well, it was never numbered  :lol:

apart from it's catalogue number obviously which is UP 1111 if I remember rightly

Edited by Pete S

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Think he's shitting you as well, it was never numbered  :lol:

apart from it's catalogue number obviously which is UP 1111 if I remember rightly

Yeah. Just asked him about it. Said he was mistaken when he told me. Wasn't it the first uk United Artists release?

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Stafford created a buzz. The things that went on there caused a stir. As people have pointed out other venues which ran at the same time had similar numbers through the door, but Stafford was the venue everyone talked about. Certain figures were evangelical about it–not necessarily the promoters themselves–and it was the talk of the scene. That was down to the characters involved. Think how passionate Pete Lawson and others were about some of what was going on there.

 

When doing the book one of the factors I used to decide whether to focus on a particular venue was whether you saw the name against records on lists: "Big at the Wheel", "Torch classic", "Mecca secret sound" or whatever.

 

For whatever reason Stafford was the place in the 80s which got this reputation, even though many of the records played there had been tried at other venues. I think of Tony Galla or Tommy Navarro and know that Keb and Guy played records like these at other venues before they ever got on at Stafford. Pat Brady was obviously doing everywhere, yet it's Stafford that we associate his big sounds with. We seldom see "Morecambe classic" or "Huge at Hinckley" to anything like the same degree, although those venues were popular too. 

 

Branding, whether conscious or not, plays a big part in that.

 

That isn't necessarily branding though is it, not a term I would have used.  It was just the buzz created by word of mouth and being the place to be at the time due to whatbthe promoters and the Dj's were creating, just like what happened in the past at venues such as the Mecca, Wigan, Torch etc.  It was the most progressive of the venues at that time with all those involved featuring predominately newies in the main room whereas most of the others Oddfellows, Morecambe etc were a mix with the larger percentage looking at the Dj's involved swinging towards the oldies.  Yes Keb DJ'ed at the 100 Club and Oddfellows and other venues up and down the country but that was how it was with no weekly allnighter like you had in the past.   I think the so called branding came in later years when looking back at what Stafford left behind musically which the other venues of the time didn't do so necessarily. 

 

I am not taking anything away from other venues, all had their own style and all popular venues which created their own buzz and it all added up to a great scene throughout the 80's and into the early 90's for many.

Edited by chalky

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Yeah. Just asked him about it. Said he was mistaken when he told me. Wasn't it the first uk United Artists release?

 

No, would have been 111th I think - if they started at 1000 - can't remember exactly when they started because they used to use a split label with HMV records to begin with - 1962-63 I think

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I always remember coming home from Stafford one morning and playing the records I'd bought to my wife (Highland room girl, went to wigan once, but couldn't stand the girls toilets or the music at wigan!!)..............

 

She turned round to me and said "How come its taken you so long to get into SOUL music!" (She is always right :ohmy: )

 

For me Wigan closing was the beginning of my ears being opened to rare soul music.  I heard some horrible records at Stafford, clifton hall and other venues after wigan, but the good certainly outweighed the bad.

 

Also I strongly believe that the Wilton all-nighters were ground breaking music wise and deserves mentions along with the other post wigan clubs.

 

Post wigan clubs in 80T's and 90T's also had real die-hard allnighter crowd who supported the scene and you would be guaranteed to see the same  people most week-ends.  I remember Stan from Preston coming back from the 100 club and raving over Flash McKinley "I'll rescue you" (think it was Irish greg?),  the following month 8 of us travelled just to hear this record!!

 

It couldn't happen today as you would just go on Youtube.

 

Lots of local nights too, e.g. Westhoughton cricket club, which was run by Paul Johnson, provided a good mix of rare soul too.....

 

but like the film states "If you were there, you’ll know. If you weren’t there, you’ll wish you had been.  The same relates to the clubs from 1982-1995.

 

Maybe I'm looking through rose tainted glasses at this era, but I've been attending various soul clubs from 1971 to 2011 and the best period (for me) was 1982 to 1994. 

 

Don't get me wrong I loved Wigan attending from the first night to the end, but it certainly didn't end there.......It got better!

 

 Keep it dark, dodgy and underground.............well thats how it used to be :thumbsup:

 

Louis

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I always remember coming home from Stafford one morning and playing the records I'd bought to my wife (Highland room girl, went to wigan once, but couldn't stand the girls toilets or the music at wigan!!)..............

 

She turned round to me and said "How come its taken you so long to get into SOUL music!" (She is always right :ohmy: )

 

For me Wigan closing was the beginning of my ears being opened to rare soul music.  I heard some horrible records at Stafford, clifton hall and other venues after wigan, but the good certainly outweighed the bad.

 

Also I strongly believe that the Wilton all-nighters were ground breaking music wise and deserves mentions along with the other post wigan clubs.

 

Post wigan clubs in 80T's and 90T's also had real die-hard allnighter crowd who supported the scene and you would be guaranteed to see the same  people most week-ends.  I remember Stan from Preston coming back from the 100 club and raving over Flash McKinley "I'll rescue you" (think it was Irish greg?),  the following month 8 of us travelled just to hear this record!!

 

It couldn't happen today as you would just go on Youtube.

 

Lots of local nights too, e.g. Westhoughton cricket club, which was run by Paul Johnson, provided a good mix of rare soul too.....

 

but like the film states "If you were there, you’ll know. If you weren’t there, you’ll wish you had been.  The same relates to the clubs from 1982-1995.

 

Maybe I'm looking through rose tainted glasses at this era, but I've been attending various soul clubs from 1971 to 2011 and the best period (for me) was 1982 to 1994. 

 

Don't get me wrong I loved Wigan attending from the first night to the end, but it certainly didn't end there.......It got better!

 

 Keep it dark, dodgy and underground.............well thats how it used to be :thumbsup:

 

Louis

 

What a great, reasonable, balanced post!  Nice one!

 

 

Cheers,

Mark R

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I always remember coming home from Stafford one morning and playing the records I'd bought to my wife (Highland room girl, went to wigan once, but couldn't stand the girls toilets or the music at wigan!!)..............

 

She turned round to me and said "How come its taken you so long to get into SOUL music!" (She is always right :ohmy: )

 

For me Wigan closing was the beginning of my ears being opened to rare soul music.  I heard some horrible records at Stafford, clifton hall and other venues after wigan, but the good certainly outweighed the bad.

 

Maybe I'm looking through rose tainted glasses at this era, but I've been attending various soul clubs from 1971 to 2011 and the best period (for me) was 1982 to 1994. 

 

Don't get me wrong I loved Wigan attending from the first night to the end, but it certainly didn't end there.......It got better!

 

 Keep it dark, dodgy and underground.............well thats how it used to be :thumbsup:

 

Louis

 

I'm with your wife dude. I think she was pretty bang on.  :lol:

 

If you were attending soul clubs from 1971 and it took until Wigan closing in 1982 - some 11 years, before your 'ears were opened to real soul music', then how did you manage to miss out on the vibe and the incredible music that that happened throughout those previous 11 years despite being there?

 

Youthful dementia, intensive treatment with psychotic drugs or aggravated deafness? There must be some reason..... for me it was the best era bar none. So I'm curious. 

 

I reckon you're a dark, dodgy, underground kinda guy who dislikes crowds.  :lol:

 

Ian D  :D

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.........for me it was the best era bar none.

Ian D :D

Ian, a few weeks ago you were telling us that you were in New York or somewhere in the 80's, so how do you know the Wigan era was the best era?

I'm not always spoiling for a fight mate......really I'm not, but you can't have it both ways.....it's just not credible!!

Cheers,

MarkR

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The book was really written for a wider audience, as it had to be. It was published by the biggest publisher in the world. The focus was to be a tie-in with the film and the hope was that the film would introduce people to NS. I hope that didn't mean a dumbing down. I tried to write it for people who had a wider interest in music and cultural history. It was written in a hurry (less than two months from start to finish) so the list of people I could interview was limited.

 

Gareth - if the book was written to introduce Northern Soul to people then OK as it informs...but if it was to introduce people to Northern Soul then some doubts as the scene does not need hand-baggers, voyeurs, tourists etc.

 

As a tie-in with the forthcoming film, the book was a logical bit of marketing plus a useful volume with a different slant to the books hitherto published.

 

I for one wish the film every success but hope that it does not rebound on the scene by attracting wannabe DJ's and acrobats. The Northern Soul movement will continue to thrive because of the music potential sought by devotees and   the less the media are involved, the better things will be.

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Ian, a few weeks ago you were telling us that you were in New York or somewhere in the 80's, so how do you know the Wigan era was the best era?

I'm not always spoiling for a fight mate......really I'm not, but you can't have it both ways.....it's just not credible!!

Cheers,

MarkR

 

The clue is in the phrase "for me it was the best era bar none". That's me personally Mark. Can't talk for anyone else and I wasn't comparing the 70s to any other decade or the scene from '82 onwards which seems to be a bit of an obsession for some. :lol: 

 

This whole debate is really about what age people were when they entered the scene surely? A bit daft I think. I was a carefree teenager in the early 70s having the time of my life so I have extremely fond memories of pretty much that whole decade. Likewise I'm sure that anyone who was a teenager in the 80s or 90s would say the same thing really.

 

Ian D :D  

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I for one wish the film every success but hope that it does not rebound on the scene by attracting wannabe DJ's and acrobats. 

 

I for one, have banned any acrobats from coming within 10 yards of me. Dangerous f*ckers!  :lol:

 

Ian D  :D

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The clue is in the phrase "for me it was the best era bar none". That's me personally Mark. Can't talk for anyone else and I wasn't comparing the 70s to any other decade or the scene from '82 onwards which seems to be a bit of an obsession for some. :lol: 

 

This whole debate is really about what age people were when they entered the scene surely? A bit daft I think. I was a carefree teenager in the early 70s having the time of my life so I have extremely fond memories of pretty much that whole decade. Likewise I'm sure that anyone who was a teenager in the 80s or 90s would say the same thing really.

 

Ian D :D  

I was 16 in 1971 and walked into the Highland room hearing Tony Jebb playing Breakout.  I was hooked and from then on I went out every weekend and bought "Northern soul" records.  Life in the fast lane, 100% Stompers.

I was 27 in 1982 (married with kids) still going out most weekends (remember that era saw many unemployed, including myself) .   No longer a teenager, maybe I grew up a little and therefore my tastes changed or I became more accepting of different musical genres.  A big influence for me (and others?) who continued after 1982 was the tape cassette.   Prior to 1982 the D.J. (or as I prefer to call them record putteroners :) ) was revered by the masses.  Stafford spawned the vinyl collectors who shared their collection with others by passing on cassettes, with not just 100% stompers but other tracks (e.g. In your arms-Betty Everett,  Lonely soldier-Mike williams, Down by the ocean-George n sonny sands and other such non-northern selections).

This helped my development from being a 100 miles an hour dancing all night Northern souler record collector into becoming a rare soul collecter. 

One of my clearest memories of Stafford was only 5 of us on the dancefloor dancing to Monique-If you love me.  That would never have happened at Wigan.

 

Your quote: If you were attending soul clubs from 1971 and it took until Wigan closing in 1982 - some 11 years, before your 'ears were opened to real soul music', then how did you manage to miss out on the vibe and the incredible music that that happened throughout those previous 11 years despite being there?

 

I didn't miss out on the vibe or the incredible music I just didn't get off the train at Wigan, but stayed on the train to continue with the vibe and incredible music for 40 plus years................

 

Louis (Dark, Dodgy and proud :) )

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I was 16 in 1971 and walked into the Highland room hearing Tony Jebb playing Breakout.  I was hooked and from then on I went out every weekend and bought "Northern soul" records.  Life in the fast lane, 100% Stompers.

I was 27 in 1982 (married with kids) still going out most weekends (remember that era saw many unemployed, including myself) .   No longer a teenager, maybe I grew up a little and therefore my tastes changed or I became more accepting of different musical genres.  A big influence for me (and others?) who continued after 1982 was the tape cassette.   Prior to 1982 the D.J. (or as I prefer to call them record putteroners :) ) was revered by the masses.  Stafford spawned the vinyl collectors who shared their collection with others by passing on cassettes, with not just 100% stompers but other tracks (e.g. In your arms-Betty Everett,  Lonely soldier-Mike williams, Down by the ocean-George n sonny sands and other such non-northern selections).

This helped my development from being a 100 miles an hour dancing all night Northern souler record collector into becoming a rare soul collecter. 

One of my clearest memories of Stafford was only 5 of us on the dancefloor dancing to Monique-If you love me.  That would never have happened at Wigan.

 

Your quote: If you were attending soul clubs from 1971 and it took until Wigan closing in 1982 - some 11 years, before your 'ears were opened to real soul music', then how did you manage to miss out on the vibe and the incredible music that that happened throughout those previous 11 years despite being there?

 

I didn't miss out on the vibe or the incredible music I just didn't get off the train at Wigan, but stayed on the train to continue with the vibe and incredible music for 40 plus years................

 

Louis (Dark, Dodgy and proud :) )

 

Very nice post, and well put.

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The clue is in the phrase "for me it was the best era bar none". That's me personally Mark. Can't talk for anyone else and I wasn't comparing the 70s to any other decade or the scene from '82 onwards which seems to be a bit of an obsession for some. :lol: 

 

This whole debate is really about what age people were when they entered the scene surely? A bit daft I think. I was a carefree teenager in the early 70s having the time of my life so I have extremely fond memories of pretty much that whole decade. Likewise I'm sure that anyone who was a teenager in the 80s or 90s would say the same thing really.

 

Ian D :D  

 

Ian, I agree completely with your second paragraph, though I don't think it's daft, I see it as perfectly understandable.  I was the opposite, being too young in the 70's but started the adventure early 80's.  BUT, these facts should tell you that I have no "obsession" with comparing decades if that was aimed at me, as I was not there in the 70's.....so I'm not qualified to do it!!

 

It seems to me that you were saying the 70's was the best period of your life, not of the scene.  If that's what you meant then fine of course because in that context it makes sense, but that's not how it read to me in the context of this thread.

 

Such ambiguity would not arise in a face to face chat, which will shall have over that beer soon!  :thumbup:

 

 

Cheers,

Mark R

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I was 16 in 1971 and walked into the Highland room hearing Tony Jebb playing Breakout.  I was hooked and from then on I went out every weekend and bought "Northern soul" records.  Life in the fast lane, 100% Stompers.

I was 27 in 1982 (married with kids) still going out most weekends (remember that era saw many unemployed, including myself) .   No longer a teenager, maybe I grew up a little and therefore my tastes changed or I became more accepting of different musical genres.  A big influence for me (and others?) who continued after 1982 was the tape cassette.   Prior to 1982 the D.J. (or as I prefer to call them record putteroners :) ) was revered by the masses.  Stafford spawned the vinyl collectors who shared their collection with others by passing on cassettes, with not just 100% stompers but other tracks (e.g. In your arms-Betty Everett,  Lonely soldier-Mike williams, Down by the ocean-George n sonny sands and other such non-northern selections).

This helped my development from being a 100 miles an hour dancing all night Northern souler record collector into becoming a rare soul collecter. 

One of my clearest memories of Stafford was only 5 of us on the dancefloor dancing to Monique-If you love me.  That would never have happened at Wigan.

 

Your quote: If you were attending soul clubs from 1971 and it took until Wigan closing in 1982 - some 11 years, before your 'ears were opened to real soul music', then how did you manage to miss out on the vibe and the incredible music that that happened throughout those previous 11 years despite being there?

 

I didn't miss out on the vibe or the incredible music I just didn't get off the train at Wigan, but stayed on the train to continue with the vibe and incredible music for 40 plus years................

 

Louis (Dark, Dodgy and proud :) )

 

 

Another great post.........and the tape bit, and changing musical taste, strikes a chord with me.....absolutely!

 

 

Cheers,

Mark R

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Thanks

for the info about the interview with john anderson will wait with bated breath.

The problem i see about this program is it was only really concerned with wigan.

This is pretty obivious seeing the only people talking mainly have just resurfaced on the scene because northern soul is popular again.

Making money at certain venues playing worn out oldies and also worn out D/Js living on old reputaions.

There were d/js from around the country did not get a mention one legend like or loath him soul sam.

Noticed that mr levine is still a bitter man after all these years saying this graet d/j in his time.

The scene has survived and moved on from the wigan days there are and have been better venues all over the uk,playing great music lets be honest here wigan was mainly filled with people who were young and the music policy was white or black music 100mph sounds as i have got older i appreiate more soulful sounds.

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Thanks

for the info about the interview with john anderson will wait with bated breath.

The problem i see about this program is it was only really concerned with wigan.

This is pretty obivious seeing the only people talking mainly have just resurfaced on the scene because northern soul is popular again.

Making money at certain venues playing worn out oldies and also worn out D/Js living on old reputaions.

There were d/js from around the country did not get a mention one legend like or loath him soul sam.

Noticed that mr levine is still a bitter man after all these years saying this graet d/j in his time.

The scene has survived and moved on from the wigan days there are and have been better venues all over the uk,playing great music lets be honest here wigan was mainly filled with people who were young and the music policy was white or black music 100mph sounds as i have got older i appreiate more soulful sounds.

 

Your're welcome. We interviewed Sam a couple of weeks back so that worked out very nicely.

 

I won't get drawn on the other stuff 'cos we'll be going down the same path again and at cross-purposes. As I've said a gazillion times previously, if someone wants to step up and make a program about the 80s forward then fine, go for it. I'll watch it.  :D

 

Ian D  :D

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"I didn't miss out on the vibe or the incredible music I just didn't get off the train at Wigan, but stayed on the train to continue with the vibe and incredible music for 40 plus years................"
 
Louis 
the above quote just about sums up this entire debate perfectly for me.

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