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Edward Hamilton & The Arabians - 60's Detroit Acetate

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Just having a flick through an old box and found this which I picked up in 1997:

 

Edward Hamilton & the Arabians - "Now you have to cry alone" / "Temptation of love" 

 

Looks like and smells like an original 60's acetate for LANROD 1605  (Yellow copy rather than the Red one which has "I love you so") not sure why all the brown tape or why it has CARRIE in biro as this was a Lanrod single. 

 

Its been cut on a  UNITED SOUND SYSTEMS, DETROIT(LANROD) Acetate disc

 

Probably just interesting rather than having much value?

 

Anyone see anything like this before?

 

 

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Thanks, Ray

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"Now You Have to Cry Alone" was released both on James Hendrix's Carrie Records (1964) and on Lanrod Records (1966? or 1967?).  So, it is not surprising that Carrie Records was listed on the acetate.  The flip of the Lanrod release was "I Love You So", while "Temptation of Love" was on Carrie 039.   Therefore, we must conclude that this acetate was made for the Carrie release in 1964.

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Carrie 038, by Gearlene Duckett, out virtually the same time as The Arabians' Carrie 039 was out in 1964, as we can clearly tell from the writing style of the song, and the instrumentation, and sound quality of the recording.   I saw those yellow Carrie records years before I saw a Lanrod release.  James Hendrix stated in an interview referred to in "Detroit City Limits" in 1988, that he and and Lou Beatty (who had partnered up for many release projects on Beatty's LaBeat and Mary Jane labels) had a falling out in late 1966, and when Hendrix had finally recovered his original masters, he left Detroit to return to Nashille.  He operated Carrie records out of Nashville again, starting then, and also issued and re-issued records on Lanrod Records.  So, apparently, the Lanrod 1605 re-issue of "Now You Have To Cry Alone" was released in 1967.   He operated Lanrod before returning to Nashville, as there were other releases produced by him before 1967, and also on the related Arnold, and Staff Records.

Edited by RobbK

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During a conversation with Edward Hamilton , I raised the subject of their being two Lanrod releases of "Now You Have To Cry Alone"

He claimed that Lanrod initially leased "Now You Have To Cry Alone/Temptation Of Love" from Hendrix but such was the popularity of "Now You Have To Cry Alone" in the Florida area that they later returned to Hendrix (who at that time was very disenchanted with the music business) and reputedlybought the masters to "I Love You So/Now I Have To Cry Alone" outright and re- released them on the Red Lanrod Label.

The difference in the  publishing credits on the Red label (IRP Music BMI) as opposed to (Mester BMI) on the Yellow Label would seem to support this theory.

Dave

Edited by Louise

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I can't read clearly the writing on the right hand side of the A side of the acetate.  But, it looks lik "....anrod" from Lanrod.  Is THAT why you thought that the acetate was for Lanrod 1605?  Please let me know.  I see no evidence that this was for Lanrod, as it has the Carrie issue backside rather than "I Love You So". 

 

Apparently, Hendrix's masters, made previous to his partnership with Beatty, were also housed at Beatty's office, along with those of the projects they worked on together.  When Hendrix ended the partnership and finally got back his masters, he re-released  many of them on Carrie and Lanrod.  Hendrix indicated that Beatty released some of Hendrix's recordings without telling him and without permission.  I assume that that and keeping money to himself that should have been split may have been the main reasons for Hendrix leaving.

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During a conversation with Edward Hamilton , I raised the subject of their being two Lanrod releases of "Now You Have To Cry Alone"

He claimed that Lanrod initially leased "Now You Have To Cry Alone/Temptation Of Love" from Hendrix but such was the popularity of "Now You Have To Cry Alone" in the Florida area that they later returned to Hendrix (who at that time was very disenchanted with the music business) and reputedlybought the masters to "I Love You So/Now I Have To Cry Alone" outright and re- released them on the Red Lanrod Label.

So then Lanrod was owned by someone else than Hendrix.  Do you know who owned it?  Did you ask Hamilton who Cllifford Binns was?  Did you ask him if Cornelius Grant was their manager, and was moonlighting with them while he was working at Motown with The Temptations?

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With Cornelius playing Guitar on Hamilton's "I'm Gonna Love You" and penning the Arabian's "(Please) Take A Chance On Me" I would say kinda moonlighting. Yes I did ask him about Clifford Binns a very elusive see a previous thread about Clifford on here.

As for Hendrix owning Lanrod initially he may well have done and sold the label name, masters and publishing  outright to the guys in Florida.

Dave

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With Cornelius playing Guitar on Hamilton's "I'm Gonna Love You" and penning the Arabian's "(Please) Take A Chance On Me" I would say kinda moonlighting. Yes I did ask him about Clifford Binns a very elusive see a previous thread about Clifford on here.

As for Hendrix owning Lanrod initially he may well have done and sold the label name, masters and publishing  outright to the guys in Florida.

Dave

Yes, I was a particopant on that thread.  So, I guess we will never know.  The two sound very alike,  Some of Hamiltons photos make him look very different, but a couple look very like the one Binns photo.  I think the early Lanrod and Arnold were sister labels, probably owned by Hendrix with a money partner.  Carrie was his own.  So, I think the other labels, including Staff, were partnerships (other than the one with Beatty).

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"Now You Have to Cry Alone" was released both on James Hendrix's Carrie Records (1964) and on Lanrod Records (1966? or 1967?).  So, it is not surprising that Carrie Records was listed on the acetate.  The flip of the Lanrod release was "I Love You So", while "Temptation of Love" was on Carrie 039.   Therefore, we must conclude that this acetate was made for the Carrie release in 1964.

Indeed but might be a bit more tricky;

 

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The acetate was done for Carrie then with the title release as 'temptation of love'. It was then re-released soon after on Lanrod (yellow still with title 'TOL'). 'I love you so' was most likely change for a better fitting title and growing success. It was re-release and briefly (most copies have the distributer credits blacked out) picked-up for national distribution on Lanrod (red) with an "improved" mix work for 'ILYS' IMHO. 

Edited by tlscapital

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I knew that the yellow Lanrod was out about the same time as Arnold Records.  I assume this was co-owned by James Hendrix and a money partner to afford to press more records than Carrie could do with only his money.  I assume that this money partner was named "Arnold".   The flip side of this Arnold record has "Mester Music", the same publisher as the yellow Lanrods.  And it has the same plastic and record physical features (indenture, thickness, etc. as the yellow Lanrods, and also the same label design and font.  Mester Music was probably the publisher of the Hendrix-Arnold partnership.  I assumed that Carrie 039 came out first, only in Detroit,  Then, soon after, the yellow Lanrod came out also in 1964, to get better (regional) distribution.  I assumed that the red pressing was released in 1967, after Hendrix got the masters back from Lou Beatty.

 

But, you seem to be saying that there was a red pressing in 1964, to distribute the record nationally.  Am I understanding you correctly?

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But all the red pressings I've ever seen had "Distrubuted by Independent Producers' Group" printed on them.  Did IPG distribute them in 1964, and then AGAIN in 1967?  Or are you saying that the red Lanrod was released ONLY in 1964?

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But all the red pressings I've ever seen had "Distrubuted by Independent Producers' Group" printed on them.  Did IPG distribute them in 1964, and then AGAIN in 1967?  Or are you saying that the red Lanrod was released ONLY in 1964?

The red copies with "Distrubuted by Independent Producers' Group" is a later pressing. How late I could not say. But like stated here above by Dave with a "revive" factor for the record in Florida and the split between Beatty and Hendrix it all make sense it could be a '66 or '67 release where the Carrie is '64. I was just pointing out that the title 'temptation of love' was also released on Lanrod (yellow) as it was also released as 'I love you so' both on yellow Lanrod as the later red one ! And while I was at it, the mix on the red one is somewhat slowed down some to a smoother effect that IMHO suits the song for an improvement. And I'm very conservative with those issues, treatments kinda things in general !

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