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Chris Turnbull

Post Office Club Manchester - Memories?

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Couple of recent threads about 90's venues (Pitches) and  tunes (Martyn) made me think about a short lived night I ran during 1993 with Alan Darker and Dave Hind at the Post Office Club, Quay St, Manchester. Anyone remember it / attend?

 

I was looking for a decent central Manchester venue having done a Wed night a couple of years earlier at the Old Steam Brewery on Oxford Road with help from Alan D, Steve Cato, Mark Robertson (a regular guest who played some superb records at 11 out of10 volume), Pip Smith, among others. Came across the Post Office club one lunchtime and found it had a cool function room on the first floor with a good stage, decent square dancefloor, seating around the edges, etc - nicely shabby and all in all a great spot. They were happy to give us a go so I booked up one Friday a month for the next six months.

 

Never really took off in any big way but we used to get a decent crowd of regulars including the great and good of Manchester - Rod S, Searling and Dean, Phil Wainwright, Dave Ripolles, etc. Had some good fun and heard some great tunes. Plug was pulled after six months when the building was sold, and subsequently demolished to make way for flats.

 

Some tunes that were spun regularly and hold fond memories for me:-

 

Dave Hind:-

 

Annette Poindexter - Wayward Dream

Billy Kent -Take it all this time

Roger Hatcher - Your love is a masterpiece

Esther Phillips - Nobody but you

Bobby Hutton - Loving you, needing you, wanting you

 

Me:-

 

The Ultimates - Girl I've been trying to tell you

Vaneese & Carolyn - Goodbye Song

Bobby Wilburn - I'm a lonely man

O C Smith - Colour him father

Willie Hutch - I like everything about you 

 

Alan D:-

 

Patterson Twins - Gotta find a true love

Kenny Hamber - Anything you want

Isley Bros - My love is your  love

Jimmy Bo Horne -If you want my love

Will Collins & Willpower - Anything I can do

 

Good times  :) 

 

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Dont remember the Post Office club nights , but I remember the Old Steam Brewery , I remember it as a Saturday night session , maybe there were two separate nights held there?

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Yeah went a few times,bought some nice stuff off Dave Hind when he sold up.

 

Me too, funny he had his sales box under the counter in Goldmine until Tim Brown found out  :D

 

Some great stuff he sold and all at 90's prices of course

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Dont remember the Post Office club nights , but I remember the Old Steam Brewery , I remember it as a Saturday night session , maybe there were two separate nights held there?

 

Yeah, the Sat nights were a year or so earlier run by Gordon from World of Twist. I did it early-mid 1991. Another great venue now gone 

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My mind as gone blank on the post office club, any photos, I know I must have been there, ha ha.. The Old Steam Brewery, my first ever events there after moving to Manchester, great times in that cellar bar..

 

I don't have any photos unfortunately, but you definitely were there at least once - remember playing Johnny Gilliam 'Room full of tears' for you!

 

Some great nights at the Old Steam as you say - always that musty smell and candles everywhere  

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Yeah, the Sat nights were a year or so earlier run by Gordon from World of Twist. I did it early-mid 1991. Another great venue now gone 

Blimey that's a name I'd almost forgot Gordon King (later with Earl Brutus) I DJ'd a regular Sunday Evening session at the Motown Bar in Ladbrooke Grove, he and he glamour-puss girlfriend Jane made the mistake of sharing a chalet with us at one of the early Cleethorpes weekenders  :rofl:

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Chris, remember and went to both, didn't Les Hare guest at the Old Steam Brewery, or was i just chatting to him there? My biggest memory or the post office club though, was, and it may have Dave Hind, but the dj played a track and commented after "That was a Wigan track, and if that's the sort of stuff played there I'm glad i didn't go!!" But i loved the Post Office, was turned into an Aussie bar for a while?

 

Cheers John

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Chris, remember and went to both, didn't Les Hare guest at the Old Steam Brewery, or was i just chatting to him there? My biggest memory or the post office club though, was, and it may have Dave Hind, but the dj played a track and commented after "That was a Wigan track, and if that's the sort of stuff played there I'm glad i didn't go!!" But i loved the Post Office, was turned into an Aussie bar for a while?

 

Cheers John

Sounds very much like Dave Hind.  I will post some memories just as soon as I have remembered them. - Alan

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Chris, remember and went to both, didn't Les Hare guest at the Old Steam Brewery, or was i just chatting to him there? My biggest memory or the post office club though, was, and it may have Dave Hind, but the dj played a track and commented after "That was a Wigan track, and if that's the sort of stuff played there I'm glad i didn't go!!" But i loved the Post Office, was turned into an Aussie bar for a while?

 

Cheers John

 

Thanks John - Les Hare at the Old Steam probably after my nights, seem to recall him being involved there with something mid 90's rather than when I did it

 

It was Dave Hind who said that about the 'Wigan track', I think in response to Phil Wainwright having played something like Executive Four - I got a good thing going, which was out of kilter when the rest of the night was predominantly crossover and 70's 

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The post office club, while never packed, suffered from an early finnish. It was run by stewards, on a wage, with no interest in staying open late. I do remember being lectured at the bar that Parkers was too commercial. Fun for all the family.

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The post office club, while never packed, suffered from an early finnish. It was run by stewards, on a wage, with no interest in staying open late. I do remember being lectured at the bar that Parkers was too commercial. Fun for all the family.

 

You are right Dean, we could have done with a later licence

 

Presumably Dave re. Parkers?! Me and Alan were always trying to strike a balance, with Dave in the background threatening to resign. All good fun

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Me too, funny he had his sales box under the counter in Goldmine until Tim Brown found out  :D

 

Some great stuff he sold and all at 90's prices of course

Yeah Mr Caldwell £15 was a nice buy Brothers of Soul "I'd be grateful" £50 which I've still got,good times!!!  

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Yeah Mr Caldwell £15 was a nice buy Brothers of Soul "I'd be grateful" £50 which I've still got,good times!!!  

 

I got loads off him, none particularly rare, a lot of which he had played at the PO club (Esther Phillips 'Nobody but you', Bobby Hutton 'Loving you, needing you', JJ Barnes 'Got to get rid of you', Fuller Bros 'Stranger at my door' etc), but particularly remember deciding not to bother with Unique Blend 'Yes I'm in love' for £20 which I am fairly sure he sold to Butch, who of course turned it into a monster sound 

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The post office club, while never packed, suffered from an early finnish. It was run by stewards, on a wage, with no interest in staying open late. I do remember being lectured at the bar that Parkers was too commercial. Fun for all the family.

Cause it had an early finnish.  The feckin postmen had to be up at 4.30 the next morning for work

 

Seriously, its hard to imagine such a venue in any city centre these days.  Three floors dedicated to pleasuring postal workers and their families with Holts, billiards and fried egg sandwiches.  When we booked the room for the first time they seemed very bemused and remarked that they had never had a music event before other than a Gary Numan conference.  That didn't bode well.

 

Musically I think we did alright.  Dave had all the in records although it is open to debate whether he played them in the right order!  Chris and me filled in the rest.  A mixture of crossover, northern and 70's.  We did have some excellent guests; the then Caroline Shard,  Julie Halliwell (now Mrs Molloy), and an unknown David Ripolles, and not forgetting Phil Wainwright who was a tad controversial with his choice of music on the first night.  That said, Phil did have some followers which is more then the rest of us had.  I think Bernard Lowe, who  sorted out the sound system also did a bit.

 

The night never really took off, although the people that did come along were all great and many became lifelong friends.  I do remember the last record of the whole thing was Jimmy Delphs "Almost".

 

The venue ended up a dreadful Australian theme bar.  Bizarrely the only time I went in there I bumped into Rolf Harris, but that's another story.

 

Regards Alan

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Cause it had an early finnish.  The feckin postmen had to be up at 4.30 the next morning for work

 

Seriously, its hard to imagine such a venue in any city centre these days.  Three floors dedicated to pleasuring postal workers and their families with Holts, billiards and fried egg sandwiches.  When we booked the room for the first time they seemed very bemused and remarked that they had never had a music event before other than a Gary Numan conference.  That didn't bode well.

 

Musically I think we did alright.  Dave had all the in records although it is open to debate whether he played them in the right order!  Chris and me filled in the rest.  A mixture of crossover, northern and 70's.  We did have some excellent guests; the then Caroline Shard,  Julie Halliwell (now Mrs Molloy), and an unknown David Ripolles, and not forgetting Phil Wainwright who was a tad controversial with his choice of music on the first night.  That said, Phil did have some followers which is more then the rest of us had.  I think Bernard Lowe, who  sorted out the sound system also did a bit.

 

The night never really took off, although the people that did come along were all great and many became lifelong friends.  I do remember the last record of the whole thing was Jimmy Delphs "Almost".

 

The venue ended up a dreadful Australian theme bar.  Bizarrely the only time I went in there I bumped into Rolf Harris, but that's another story.

 

Regards Alan

 

Brilliant, thanks Alan - gave me a laugh - forgot about Gary Numan

 

Funny when as you say Dave had the 'in' tunes, he gave it all up for love just a few months later and sold the whole lot off - couldn't believe it

 

Cheers, Chris.

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Used to call in for a pint,before and during shifts at the Sunday Mail/People just round the corner. Amazing how many places a few copies would get you in!

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Cause it had an early finnish.  The feckin postmen had to be up at 4.30 the next morning for work

 

Seriously, its hard to imagine such a venue in any city centre these days.  Three floors dedicated to pleasuring postal workers and their families with Holts, billiards and fried egg sandwiches.  When we booked the room for the first time they seemed very bemused and remarked that they had never had a music event before other than a Gary Numan conference.  That didn't bode well.

 

Musically I think we did alright.  Dave had all the in records although it is open to debate whether he played them in the right order!  Chris and me filled in the rest.  A mixture of crossover, northern and 70's.  We did have some excellent guests; the then Caroline Shard,  Julie Halliwell (now Mrs Molloy), and an unknown David Ripolles, and not forgetting Phil Wainwright who was a tad controversial with his choice of music on the first night.  That said, Phil did have some followers which is more then the rest of us had.  I think Bernard Lowe, who  sorted out the sound system also did a bit.

 

The night never really took off, although the people that did come along were all great and many became lifelong friends.  I do remember the last record of the whole thing was Jimmy Delphs "Almost".

 

The venue ended up a dreadful Australian theme bar.  Bizarrely the only time I went in there I bumped into Rolf Harris, but that's another story.

 

Regards Alan

 

 

Bonjour!

 

Yes think I played a far too many stompers in hindsight.....

 

Yes Bernard supplied the decks (and spun a few)....Vestax with large mixer in a coffin flight case. It took four of us to get them up the stairs......

 

I also tried chatting up a girl who I thought was a scooterist.....turned out she was a lesbian....think Caroline pointed that out to me!!!

 

Got some great records off Dave Hind when he sold up....I had to work on him to get the Jimmy Conwell lp (20 quid I think) as think he wanted to keep that, TC Lee & Bricklayers and some more seventies bits from memory. I can't remember if I got a Forston and Scott off Dave....

 

Have fun and catch up soon

 

Phil

Edited by grumpyfella

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Bonjour!

 

Yes think I played a far too many stompers in hindsight.....

 

Yes Bernard supplied the decks (and spun a few)....Vestax with large mixer in a coffin flight case. It took four of us to get them up the stairs......

 

I also tried chatting up a girl who I thought was a scooterist.....turned out she was a lesbian....think Caroline pointed that out to me!!!

 

Got some great records off Dave Hind when he sold up....I had to work on him to get the Jimmy Conwell lp (20 quid I think) as think he wanted to keep that, TC Lee & Bricklayers and some more seventies bits from memory. I can't remember if I got a Forston and Scott off Dave....

 

Have fun and catch up soon

 

Phil

 

Cheers Phil - good to hear from you

 

Bernard used to play some nice stuff early doors - J D Bryant 'I won't be coming back', Willie Tee 'First Taste', etc

 

Have you still got your Marvin Holmes LP? 

 

ATB, Chris.

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Cheers Phil - good to hear from you

 

Bernard used to play some nice stuff early doors - J D Bryant 'I won't be coming back', Willie Tee 'First Taste', etc

 

Have you still got your Marvin Holmes LP? 

 

ATB, Chris.

 

Bonjour Chris

Hope you well.

Yes still got the Marvin Holmes LP......best six quid ever spent :-)

Cheers

Phil

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Guest Mrs M

I remember a very young 25 year old Julie Halliwell now Molloy making her debut behind the decks at The Post Office Club!! A woman of impeccable taste and prolific knowledge and magic record collection ha ha x

Edited by Mrs M

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Guest Mrs M

Couple of recent threads about 90's venues (Pitches) and tunes (Martyn) made me think about a short lived night I ran during 1993 with Alan Darker and Dave Hind at the Post Office Club, Quay St, Manchester. Anyone remember it / attend?

I was looking for a decent central Manchester venue having done a Wed night a couple of years earlier at the Old Steam Brewery on Oxford Road with help from Alan D, Steve Cato, Mark Robertson (a regular guest who played some superb records at 11 out of10 volume), Pip Smith, among others. Came across the Post Office club one lunchtime and found it had a cool function room on the first floor with a good stage, decent square dancefloor, seating around the edges, etc - nicely shabby and all in all a great spot. They were happy to give us a go so I booked up one Friday a month for the next six months.

Never really took off in any big way but we used to get a decent crowd of regulars including the great and good of Manchester - Rod S, Searling and Dean, Phil Wainwright, Dave Ripolles, etc. Had some good fun and heard some great tunes. Plug was pulled after six months when the building was sold, and subsequently demolished to make way for flats.

Some tunes that were spun regularly and hold fond memories for me:-

Dave Hind:-

Annette Poindexter - Wayward Dream

Billy Kent -Take it all this time

Roger Hatcher - Your love is a masterpiece

Esther Phillips - Nobody but you

Bobby Hutton - Loving you, needing you, wanting you

Me:-

The Ultimates - Girl I've been trying to tell you

Vaneese & Carolyn - Goodbye Song

Bobby Wilburn - I'm a lonely man

O C Smith - Colour him father

Willie Hutch - I like everything about you

Alan D:-

Patterson Twins - Gotta find a true love

Kenny Hamber - Anything you want

Isley Bros - My love is your love

Jimmy Bo Horne -If you want my love

Will Collins & Willpower - Anything I can do

Good times :)

Ahem... Don't forget about me boys??? x

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See post no 16 Julie - you're in there!  :yes:

 

Another venue I never got to but followed what you were up to whenever I could.

The only one I remember going to was an upstairs room in a pub in the city centre and Alan coming over and apologizing for it being quiet that night!

 

Great music all the same, and that was all that mattered!  :thumbsup:

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I remember a very young 25 year old Julie Halliwell now Molloy making her debut behind the decks at The Post Office Club!! A woman of impeccable taste and prolific knowledge and magic record collection ha ha x

 

Hi Julie, good to hear from you - remember you playing Rita Graham 'My cup runneth over' which I love. Remember some good nights at Wilton too nicking fags off you when I was supposed to have given up  

 

Do you still see Tim?

 

Cheers, Chris.

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Guest Mrs M

Hello Chris

How you doing? Good memory and spot on, I did play Rita Graham along with Rose Brooks, Joey Gee and many others. I still have a copy of my playlist somewhere! I am still in contact with Tim although we don't get time to meet up much.

We definitely had great times back then with so many fabulous records being played. Happy days x

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Guest Mrs M

See post no 16 Julie - you're in there! :yes:

Another venue I never got to but followed what you were up to whenever I could.

The only one I remember going to was an upstairs room in a pub in the city centre and Alan coming over and apologizing for it being quiet that night!

Great music all the same, and that was all that mattered! :thumbsup:

I know John I was recalling my younger days with some special friends, still to this day. Although it's lucky for Alan he didn't forget me or I would have be giving him grief next time I get to see him lol

Love you Mr Darker!!!

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Couple of recent threads about 90's venues (Pitches) and  tunes (Martyn) made me think about a short lived night I ran during 1993 with Alan Darker and Dave Hind at the Post Office Club, Quay St, Manchester. Anyone remember it / attend?

 

I was looking for a decent central Manchester venue having done a Wed night a couple of years earlier at the Old Steam Brewery on Oxford Road with help from Alan D, Steve Cato, Mark Robertson (a regular guest who played some superb records at 11 out of10 volume), Pip Smith, among others. Came across the Post Office club one lunchtime and found it had a cool function room on the first floor with a good stage, decent square dancefloor, seating around the edges, etc - nicely shabby and all in all a great spot. They were happy to give us a go so I booked up one Friday a month for the next six months.

 

Never really took off in any big way but we used to get a decent crowd of regulars including the great and good of Manchester - Rod S, Searling and Dean, Phil Wainwright, Dave Ripolles, etc. Had some good fun and heard some great tunes. Plug was pulled after six months when the building was sold, and subsequently demolished to make way for flats.

 

Some tunes that were spun regularly and hold fond memories for me:-

 

Dave Hind:-

 

Annette Poindexter - Wayward Dream

Billy Kent -Take it all this time

Roger Hatcher - Your love is a masterpiece

Esther Phillips - Nobody but you

Bobby Hutton - Loving you, needing you, wanting you

 

Me:-

 

The Ultimates - Girl I've been trying to tell you

Vaneese & Carolyn - Goodbye Song

Bobby Wilburn - I'm a lonely man

O C Smith - Colour him father

Willie Hutch - I like everything about you 

 

Alan D:-

 

Patterson Twins - Gotta find a true love

Kenny Hamber - Anything you want

Isley Bros - My love is your  love

Jimmy Bo Horne -If you want my love

Will Collins & Willpower - Anything I can do

 

Good times  :) 

Read through this after being given a heads up by Les Hare.  Chris I feel your memory has somewhat been clouded by the years, but then you and everybody else who has posted have been to an awful lot more events than I have.

Post Office Club started April 1993 ran til September 1993.  It was supposed to be our answer to the Canal Tavern, Thorne with a hint of the 100 Club, not sure we really pulled it off, but it was fun while it lasted.  We had it booked up until xmas, but I chose to cancel the last 3 because of very poor attendance at the September one.  If I remember rightly there were 12 people there, including me, you and Alan, and the majority of them were dj's.  The night clashed with some serious big hitters and the weather was against us as well. 

Shame it didn't really take off.  Some of the quotes attributed to me are slightly off.  The only time I hinted at quitting was when Alan played a pressing of Eddie Parker 'I'm Gone'.  Great record but I had a strictly no pressings agenda.  And as for the anti-Wigan quote.  Almost right.  I played Jackie Wilson 'My Heart Is Calling',  Chris Shepard mentioned to me that it had been played at Wigan and not that well received.  My rant was in support of that record.  I would never play something I thought was crap.  I spent far to long agonizing over my set list!

Bernards opening sets were always a hard act to follow.  Nobody remember Caroline doing a set there?  It was up to the usual high standard of all our guests.

Alan, what's this about me having all the right records but not playing them in the right order?  Remember the promotional tape that I sent off to Richard Searling and John Manship.  Based purely on my playlist,  Manship put it on his tape list said it was one of the best he'd ever heard.

Some sounds I thought would have been bigger:

William Bell 'Who Will It Be Tomorrow'

Solomon Burke 'I Said I Was Sorry'

OV Wright 'I Can't Believe You've Got The Nerve T o Cry'

Themes 'No Explanation Needed'

Players 'Why Did I Lie'

Mighty Clouds Of Joy 'Millionaire'

Chuck Jackson 'Can I Change My Mind'

Jerry Butler 'Mr Dj'

 

Before I go.  Didn't sell off all my collection.  Had 3,000 7's at the time.  Sold one third to collectors like Phil Wainwright, one third I traded in at King Bee and I still have the other third.  

Oh and yes I did do it all for love.  Don't regret it.  Would do it again.  Still married to Jane, 21 years in April.

Bye for now, the much maligned David Hind.

Edited by DavidHind

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It was Dave Hind who said that about the 'Wigan track', I think in response to Phil Wainwright having played something like Executive Four - I got a good thing going, which was out of kilter when the rest of the night was predominantly crossover and 70's 

 

I commented on this earlier.  As far as Phil's set at the Post Office Club it was on the opening night and even though I didn't like everything he played I fully endorsed it.  It was Alan that hated it.   Phil was on immediately after me and I was playing to an audience who mostly sat in stunned silence not knowing what to expect next.  Alan asked me to put on something that everybody would know.  So I put on Sandra Wright 'Midnight Affair' which filled the dancefloor.  Then I handed over the decks to Phil with the quote.''there I've filled the floor for you, see how quickly you can empty it again''

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You are right Dean, we could have done with a later licence

 

Presumably Dave re. Parkers?! Me and Alan were always trying to strike a balance, with Dave in the background threatening to resign. All good fun

 

We did get a late license one month.  Can't remember which month.  Didn't make any difference to the number of punters.  If we'd had it from the start it may well have.

As for threatening to resign!  Never happened, apart from the pressing incident and I wasn't being serious.  I know you and Alan often wanted me to play stuff from my collection that was being played at other venues and I stubbornly refused.  My idea from the beginning was to establish a venue with it's own identity.  I wanted to lead not follow.

Re Parkers comment, wasn't me.  I'd admit it if it was.  I barely spoke to Dean.  My thoughts on Parkers were that it was too bland.  In retrospect it probably wasn't it just wasn't for me.  

Edited by DavidHind

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Chris Turnbull

 

The Ultimates - Girl I've been trying to tell you

Vaneese & Carolyn - Goodbye Song

Bobby Wilburn - I'm a lonely man

O C Smith - Colour him father

Willie Hutch - I like everything about you

 

Just been studying your playlist faves Chris.  Didn't I sell you my copies of Vaneese & Carolyn and the Bobby Wilburn track.  If this is the case then you certainly never played them at the Post Office Club.  I do remember you playing the other tracks on your list.  I remember having the Bobby Wilburn and the Vaneese & Carolyn in my set for a short while.  Probably played them once maybe twice then moved onto something else.

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Yeah Mr Caldwell £15 was a nice buy Brothers of Soul "I'd be grateful" £50 which I've still got,good times!!!  

I don't remember the Mr Caldwell,  Brothers of Soul cost me a fiver.

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Hi Dave,

 

Interesting to read your comments - not sure I 100% concur but who cares, it's a long time ago. I do know some great tunes were played and I remember it fondly.

 

I did play Vaneese & Carolyn and Bobby Wilburn several times - both were from Rod for £60 each, before and during the PO run, not from you later. NB. did borrow your BW one week to play because I liked it so much, then bought it from Rod before the next one   :P

 

Alan mentioned Caroline in post 16 - I remember her Johnnie Mae Matthews 'I have no choice' sounded fantastic.

 

Glad you reminded me what the O V Wright track was, been trying to remember for years 

 

Many happy lunchtimes in the old Goldmine 'Soul Cellar' chewing the fat and spinning tunes. Used to love your 'Winner' tapes around that time, put me on to so many good records that you could pick up for a few quid.

 

Didn't realise you'd kept so many - still playing them much?

 

Cheers, Chris.

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Don't really get the opportunity to play them these days.  Last time I played out was at the Temple of Convenience I don't know how many years back.  I did two sets there and my father-in-law was at the last one!

Most of my vinyl is reggae now, 5,000 7's, 700 12's, 150 10's and about 1,000 lp's.

You won't find the O.V. Wright on a 7 it was only available as a track on his first BackBeat album.  On the Vaneese & Carolyn, and Bobby Wilburn tracks we must both have played them at different times.

Did you stay in touch with Gavin and the two brothers from Liverpool who came to every one of our do's.  

If we'd carried on I had plans to produce a newsletter to hand out at the shop and to make the last hour an r&b slot.  Finish the night off on a high energy buzz.

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Don't really get the opportunity to play them these days.  Last time I played out was at the Temple of Convenience I don't know how many years back.  I did two sets there and my father-in-law was at the last one!

Most of my vinyl is reggae now, 5,000 7's, 700 12's, 150 10's and about 1,000 lp's.

You won't find the O.V. Wright on a 7 it was only available as a track on his first BackBeat album.  On the Vaneese & Carolyn, and Bobby Wilburn tracks we must both have played them at different times.

Did you stay in touch with Gavin and the two brothers from Liverpool who came to every one of our do's.  

If we'd carried on I had plans to produce a newsletter to hand out at the shop and to make the last hour an r&b slot.  Finish the night off on a high energy buzz.

 

Don't know where you find room for all the vinyl Dave 

 

Still in touch with Gav Smith, he speaks to Jim and Sean but I haven't for ages

 

Good to hear from you

 

Cheers, Chris.

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 Alan played a pressing of Eddie Parker 'I'm Gone'.  Great record but I had a strictly no pressings agenda.  

 I may be guilty of sarcasm but not guilty of playing an Eddie Parker pressing.  I've never owned the record, then or now.  I don't have many pressings and wouldn't play em out.

 

Overall the music was excellent imo.  Can't remember the battle of the ballads but that sounds great  would do that again at a drop of a hat.  Can't for the life of me remember what we would have played.

 

Regards Alan

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It's funny how other people's memories of the same events differ...for me The Post Office Club is firmly filed in the box marked 'Manchester good times', alongside Parkers, Star and Garter, Expansion, out of the past records and Goldmine. I remember really enjoying The Post Office club, and being quite excited about the idea of a full night of Crossover in Manchester alongside like minded people who were pretty much into what I was into at that time. It was also one of my first dj'ing experiences and I had my brother coming along for support; he didnt quite get the down tempo nature of the tunes being played and i vividly remember him coming up and saying 'that's more like it' when I played Earnest Baker- alone again . Think that was the only time anyone danced during my set....

 As has already been said , the early finish in a city centre Venue pretty much scuppered its chances, but it will always have a place in my heart , and is surprisingly vivid in my memory when other much more recent events have completely faded.

It was a shock when Dave gave it all up, ( and great to hear you again Dave), and like the other vultures, pulled a couple from his box, James Phelps and Billy Kent , springing to mind.....

 By the way, for the record Dean's heated debate regarding the Parker's music policy was with Harriet, Alan's then girlfriend ... and If i remember correctly she gave a pretty good account of herself :-) 

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It's funny how other people's memories of the same events differ...for me The Post Office Club is firmly filed in the box marked 'Manchester good times', alongside Parkers, Star and Garter, Expansion, out of the past records and Goldmine. I remember really enjoying The Post Office club, and being quite excited about the idea of a full night of Crossover in Manchester alongside like minded people who were pretty much into what I was into at that time. It was also one of my first dj'ing experiences and I had my brother coming along for support; he didnt quite get the down tempo nature of the tunes being played and i vividly remember him coming up and saying 'that's more like it' when I played Earnest Baker- alone again . Think that was the only time anyone danced during my set....

 As has already been said , the early finish in a city centre Venue pretty much scuppered its chances, but it will always have a place in my heart , and is surprisingly vivid in my memory when other much more recent events have completely faded.

It was a shock when Dave gave it all up, ( and great to hear you again Dave), and like the other vultures, pulled a couple from his box, James Phelps and Billy Kent , springing to mind.....

 By the way, for the record Dean's heated debate regarding the Parker's music policy was with Harriet, Alan's then girlfriend ... and If i remember correctly she gave a pretty good account of herself :-) 

 

Hi Dave, good to hear from you

 

Remember saying to Dave Hind when he wanted to put you on, "but does he have the tunes?" lol - I'll get me coat

 

Often wondered who got the James Phelps 

 

Cheers, Chris.

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Many happy lunchtimes in the old Goldmine 'Soul Cellar' chewing the fat and spinning tunes. Used to love your 'Winner' tapes around that time, put me on to so many good records that you could pick up for a few quid.

 

 

Cheers, Chris.

 

Re above quote.  Chewing the fat Janes just reminded me it was more chewing the potassium.  You often came in chomping on a banana as you were going through one of your many attempts to give up smoking.

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 I may be guilty of sarcasm but not guilty of playing an Eddie Parker pressing.  I've never owned the record, then or now.  I don't have many pressings and wouldn't play em out.

 

Overall the music was excellent imo.  Can't remember the battle of the ballads but that sounds great  would do that again at a drop of a hat.  Can't for the life of me remember what we would have played.

 

Regards Alan

I may have the exact record wrong but you definitely did play a pressing on the opening night.

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It's funny how other people's memories of the same events differ...for me The Post Office Club is firmly filed in the box marked 'Manchester good times', alongside Parkers, Star and Garter, Expansion, out of the past records and Goldmine. I remember really enjoying The Post Office club, and being quite excited about the idea of a full night of Crossover in Manchester alongside like minded people who were pretty much into what I was into at that time. It was also one of my first dj'ing experiences and I had my brother coming along for support; he didnt quite get the down tempo nature of the tunes being played and i vividly remember him coming up and saying 'that's more like it' when I played Earnest Baker- alone again . Think that was the only time anyone danced during my set....

 As has already been said , the early finish in a city centre Venue pretty much scuppered its chances, but it will always have a place in my heart , and is surprisingly vivid in my memory when other much more recent events have completely faded.

It was a shock when Dave gave it all up, ( and great to hear you again Dave), and like the other vultures, pulled a couple from his box, James Phelps and Billy Kent , springing to mind.....

 By the way, for the record Dean's heated debate regarding the Parker's music policy was with Harriet, Alan's then girlfriend ... and If i remember correctly she gave a pretty good account of herself :-) 

Re vultures buying my records.  I never made anything less than 100 percent profit on any of the records I sold.  You got them cheap compared with what they go for now.  If I'd held out for another twelve months I could have made a lot more.  Hindsight (pun intended) not one of my strong points.

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