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Windlesoul

Features: The Passions: If You See My Baby

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News/Article/Feature Highlight:

One of the most popular and rarest 1960s girl group 45 discoveries with northern soul appeal is without a doubt The Passions for their “If You See My Baby” (Elvitrue & Satelite 177). What was known before this piece of detective work commenced was that Elvitru....

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fantastic read. it's always one of those records that i love but I'm often surprised that others do too, as it's not exactly traditionally styled, but more girly and gentle.
thanks for bringing us stuff like this to read

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Superb article thanks - this record personifies the girly group sound and the northern sound all in one - two for the price of one! and is definitely in my all time top ten.

I have a question though if anyone can help?

My copy (and the one in the article) show "Hotpoint Music" but there is one on youtube that shows "Irene Music" - does this suggest that there were 2 pressing runs?

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Superb article thanks - this record personifies the girly group sound and the northern sound all in one - two for the price of one! and is definitely in my all time top ten.

I have a question though if anyone can help?

My copy (and the one in the article) show "Hotpoint Music" but there is one on youtube that shows "Irene Music" - does this suggest that there were 2 pressing runs?

Will have to check mine mark should be able to find out if any one  great reading

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I agree it appears there were two pressing runs on both of the Elvitrue / Elvitrue-Satellite 45s. Connie told me a max of 50 on both 45s as stated in the biography, but admits they were very young at the time. Their parents and Melvin Dodge dealt with the nitty gritty, which they were kept from. 'Hello College Boy' seems to be more abundant than IYSMB (and reflected in value). I wonder if Connie is referring to the first runs as that was all they had knowledge of and the girls were oblivious to second pressing run. Might explain the relative abundance of HCB despite Connie's recollection, if the second run on it was higher (the orange one maybe?). Regardless, all are still pretty hard.

 

Regarding the publishing / label credit details, Andy has more knowledge than me on the label aspect of the story, he may be able to fill us in on theories. I know I came to a bit of a dead end in this regard. BTW that's Andy's pic of IYSMB shown.

Edited by Windlesoul

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I was curious too re the Samuel Kahn thing, Tony. Wilimington label so must be.

 

As a complete aside, I notice a few copies of IYSMB are stamped WLUR, a university owned radio station out of Lexington, Virginia which opened in '67. Virginia is of course a neighbouring state to North Carolina so not too unusual I  guess, but interesting none the less for such a small run  and wonder if there is any significance. From what Rod told me this morning, a couple turned up in Winston-Salem, NC too, though these were found decades later.

Edited by Windlesoul

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