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amimiller7

Northern Soul Radio Project

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Hi,

 

I am a student from Leeds University! For my final project i am making a radio documentary on 'northern soul music then and now.' I must admit im pretty new to it all but ive had some great interviews with people and djs! I now need some younger people to talk about there interest in the music.. 30 and under would be great. Would really appreciate it if people could get in touch.. my email is amimiller@me.com. Or if anyone on here could let me know of people they know.

Thanks alot 

 

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Hi,

 

I am a student from Leeds University! For my final project i am making a radio documentary on 'northern soul music then and now.' I must admit im pretty new to it all but ive had some great interviews with people and djs! I now need some younger people to talk about there interest in the music.. 30 and under would be great. Would really appreciate it if people could get in touch.. my email is amimiller@me.com. Or if anyone on here could let me know of people they know.

Thanks alot 

I,m sure there's plenty of folk under 30 on this site and you could also visit this facebook page for Wigan young souls

https://www.facebook.com/HighfieldSoulClub

Good luck with your project...phil

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Hi Ami. 

 

Best of luck with your radio project. Will it be broadcast or is it just an in house production for your exams? May I make a couple of suggestions? There is much interest with the phenomena at the moment, so you may need an angle, something different to chew over! 

 

Presumably you have heard some of the music and are curious, maybe interested in following the trend yourself? As you know, the music speaks for itself! Actually, that's a paradox, because others speak for it as well, with their record collecting, attendance of events all over the country and dancing the night away, or just the social aspect of it at events or on social media like Soul Source. If I were you I would:

 

1) At least attend a couple of events and listen to the music, watch the body language of the young and older attendees on and off the dance floor. Some older fans don't dance (as much!), but love the atmosphere and music etc. They may be able to give their perspective too. Some younger fans are nervous about dancing and picking the steps up. I have been asked on three occasions to help at two different events, for my sins. I loved it and offered my basics lol!

 

2) Have your recorder with you in case you get an opportunity to interview somebody 'live' preferably with the music in the background, but far enough away from it to get a good recording with the atmosphere around you.

 

3) Go with a friend who may or may not be interested, but somebody who can give you support and tell others who may be curious about what you are doing, when you are recording. You don't want any distractions or interruptions.

 

4) Have some core questions ready like:

    a) How old are you?

    b) Where was the first time you heard the music and realised it's importance or how was the music introduced to you?

    c) Where did you attend your first event?

    d) Where did you learn to dance?

    e) Are you collecting vinyl now?

    f) Where do you see this scenario in 10 years time?

    g) Have you ever heard Spyder Turner's 'Tell me (crying over you)', recorded in Detroit?

 

5) If the event you attend has any dealers selling records, go and look through some of them. Look at the labels, the details on the record particularly the writers and producers (as well as the song title/artist). There are trends you can pick up from a label about the quality of a song or its production value. That spills over into the collecting side, because like me, I would always buy certain records based on the writers/producers not necessarily the artists performing them.

 

6) Learn to dance some basic steps and get on the dance floor. 'Feel' the music and witness the event from the dance floor. You will often hear and see when a good respectable oldie comes on as many leg it to the dance floor. But, if a new 'rare' find gets played, the dynamics change. You know when the music hooks you - you will get a shiver down your neck and back. When that happens, mission accomplished.....and you too are now hooked for life!

 

Ami, from my perspective and age, I do not drink alcohol at any event where I dance. I see young and old getting tipsy. I go specifically to dance, on my own. Maybe chat occasionally, but dancing is my passion. Because I often spend up to 5 hours dancing I have to ensure my blood sugars are respected, so drink diet coke for hydration and fruit juices or regular coke for hydration and sugar. Obsessive? You bet. I would hate to miss a dance to my favourite records. Talking of which, two songs were the defining attraction of soul music as a 17 year old to me:

 

1) 'At the top of the stairs' by The Formations

Great melody, harmonies and production. Recorded in Philly circa 1967. Written by Jerry Akines and Leon Huff at 309 Broadstreet, Philadelphia - which is being pulled down as I type this I believe. Huff became one of the significant architects of the Sound of Philadelphia (after Weldon Mcdougal/The Four Larks). I knew none of that when I first heard that record in Hull. I accidentally met Buddy Turner, one of the group members in 1994 at Sigma Sound Studios/Philly and he told me the story of the record and as he did...I lifted off the floor and went somewhere else in the cosmos - a feeling to this day I have never had again. Imagine being 17 and hearing the record for the first time and then 21 years later by chance meeting one of the group. Priceless.

 

2) 'Girls are out to get you' by The Fascinations

This song stopped me on the dance floor and makes me shiver still today. A great piece of Chicago soul, but with a Detroit group singing and written by Curtis Mayfield.

 

So, go for it and I look forward to hearing the fruits of your labour and your favourite record! Oh, and see you on the dance floor!

Edited by Carl Dixon

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Also Ami..

 

If you are to record in the venue, you would be respectful to ask the organiser if he objected or indeed would agree to an interview too. He may well be one of the DJ's and they have amazing knowledge.Take photos, with permission, to help jog your memory about things. I know many don't mind being photographed or videod, but some do. It's an intrusion sometimes and quite annoying...but, it doesn't stop me dancing. I turn away when it does not suit. But to see yourself on line when paying an entrance fee and not advised their will be media gathering is a trend that many do not like and rightly so. Also when I first started going to discos, this music tended to be called 'soul'. It took me a long time to accept 'Northern Soul' as I did not understand it. These days, it sums up a scenario that is now evolving in all sorts of directions. And I really am not an expert for sure.

 

I think to get a balance you need originals and newcomers. I am not an original all nighter fan. I am a soul fan from 1973 who has evolved over the years to do a number of things with the music. Now, I am more accepting of what is happening and its interesting.

Edited by Carl Dixon

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