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Dee Dee Sharp's Recordings


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Guest vinylvixen

Just listening to the recently released 'The Best of Dee Dee Sharp - 1962-1966' and decided to read the sleeve notes...the following tracks have always interested me with their distinctly different 'sound'...and until now, I always thought that DD only recorded her Cameo sides in Philly...how wrong could I be.

  • Deep Dark Secret was a 1964 recording and produced by Bob Crewe/ arranged by Charlie Calello...Big City sound - recorded in the Olmstead Sound Studios in NY City.
  • There Ain't Nothing I Wouldn't do was co-written by Kenny Gamble and produced by Gamble and Huff - recorded in Philly....
  • Standing in the Need of Love is creditted to Strong - is this Barrett Strong? Recorded in Chicago in '65, it's produced by Carl Davis but sounds more Detroit...
  • The gorgeous I Really Love you....credits to Bishop & Gamble - recorded in the CP Studios, Philly...Gamble & Huff production, and arranger credits go to Luther Randolph, Rick Kellis and Joe Renzetti...what a beautiful track..

And the credits for backing vocals read like a who's who....Artistics, Dreamlovers, Orlons, Persianettes & Sherrys plus Cindy Scott, Thom Bell, Vivian Jackson....and amongst the musicians are lurking Bobby Eli, Norman Harris, Earl Young, Jimmy Wisner....can you imagine being a fly on those studio walls :thumbsup:

Anyway, just thought you'd like to know :D Jo

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Guest TONY ROUNCE

Just listening to the recently released 'The Best of Dee Dee Sharp - 1962-1966' and decided to read the sleeve notes...the following tracks have always interested me with their distinctly different 'sound'...and until now, I always thought that DD only recorded her Cameo sides in Philly...how wrong could I be.
  • Deep Dark Secret was a 1964 recording and produced by Bob Crewe/ arranged by Charlie Calello...Big City sound - recorded in the Olmstead Sound Studios in NY City.
  • There Ain't Nothing I Wouldn't do was co-written by Kenny Gamble and produced by Gamble and Huff - recorded in Philly....
  • Standing in the Need of Love is creditted to Strong - is this Barrett Strong? Recorded in Chicago in '65, it's produced by Carl Davis but sounds more Detroit...
  • The gorgeous I Really Love you....credits to Bishop & Gamble - recorded in the CP Studios, Philly...Gamble & Huff production, and arranger credits go to Luther Randolph, Rick Kellis and Joe Renzetti...what a beautiful track..

And the credits for backing vocals read like a who's who....Artistics, Dreamlovers, Orlons, Persianettes & Sherrys plus Cindy Scott, Thom Bell, Vivian Jackson....and amongst the musicians are lurking Bobby Eli, Norman Harris, Earl Young, Jimmy Wisner....can you imagine being a fly on those studio walls :thumbsup:

Anyway, just thought you'd like to know :D Jo

Hi Jo,

"Standing..." is indeed a Barrett Strong composition. Dee Dee's Chicago session was a split one with Chubby Checker - also recorded that day were "Two Hearts Make One Love" (terrific, underrated record!) and "You Just Don't Know (What You Do To Me)". Not a bad day's work really....

TONE :D

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Guest vinylvixen

Hi Jo,

"Standing..." is indeed a Barrett Strong composition. Dee Dee's Chicago session was a split one with Chubby Checker - also recorded that day were "Two Hearts Make One Love" (terrific, underrated record!) and "You Just Don't Know (What You Do To Me)". Not a bad day's work really....

TONE
:D

Tony...I knew if I threw out the bait
:D
You are a star....and I always had a sneaky suspicion that 'You Just Don't Know' was special...what a tune
:D
Listening to the Orlons CD in the same series. 'Envy' was recorded in Philly and arranged by Ugene Dozier...any relation to Lamont? I'm sure you have the answer
:thumbsup:
Jo

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Hi Jo,

"Standing..." is indeed a Barrett Strong composition. Dee Dee's Chicago session was a split one with Chubby Checker - also recorded that day were "Two Hearts Make One Love" (terrific, underrated record!) and "You Just Don't Know (What You Do To Me)". Not a bad day's work really....

TONE :thumbsup:

Tone

Are you saying that Dee Dee's Standing in the need of love was recorded same day and same session as Chubby's You Just Don't Know?

Am I confused?

Colin

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Tone

Are you saying that Dee Dee's Standing in the need of love was recorded same day and same session as Chubby's You Just Don't Know?

Am I confused?

Colin

Tone

On the back of this question, do we know why "Two Hearts Make One Love" & "You Just Don't Know?" didn't gain a full release in the U.S.A.

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Guest TONY ROUNCE

Tone

Are you saying that Dee Dee's Standing in the need of love was recorded same day and same session as Chubby's You Just Don't Know?

Am I confused?

Colin

Hi Colin,

I can't see why you don't get that from my original posting but yes, that's excatly what I am saying - two artists, same studio, same day, same session. Split sessions were not uncommon in the 50s and 60s. Quite often a label would want an artist to go in to cut just a new single and its B side. Usually sessions were usually booked out in blocks of three hours and four songs were expected to be recorded in that three hours so if artist A only had an A and B side to cut, artist B would record a couple of songs, too.

Thus Dee Dee recorded her two songs (the other being "It's A Funny Situation") and Chubby recorded his two songs, all in the same session and all in Chicago's Universal Studios, I believe...

TONE :thumbsup:

Edited by TONY ROUNCE
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Just listening to the recently released 'The Best of Dee Dee Sharp - 1962-1966' and decided to read the sleeve notes...the following tracks have always interested me with their distinctly different 'sound'...and until now, I always thought that DD only recorded her Cameo sides in Philly...how wrong could I be.
  • Deep Dark Secret was a 1964 recording and produced by Bob Crewe/ arranged by Charlie Calello...Big City sound - recorded in the Olmstead Sound Studios in NY City.
  • There Ain't Nothing I Wouldn't do was co-written by Kenny Gamble and produced by Gamble and Huff - recorded in Philly....
  • Standing in the Need of Love is creditted to Strong - is this Barrett Strong? Recorded in Chicago in '65, it's produced by Carl Davis but sounds more Detroit...
  • The gorgeous I Really Love you....credits to Bishop & Gamble - recorded in the CP Studios, Philly...Gamble & Huff production, and arranger credits go to Luther Randolph, Rick Kellis and Joe Renzetti...what a beautiful track..

And the credits for backing vocals read like a who's who....Artistics, Dreamlovers, Orlons, Persianettes & Sherrys plus Cindy Scott, Thom Bell, Vivian Jackson....and amongst the musicians are lurking Bobby Eli, Norman Harris, Earl Young, Jimmy Wisner....can you imagine being a fly on those studio walls :P

Anyway, just thought you'd like to know :thumbsup: Jo

Deep dark secret - Fab record :thumbsup: and recorded the year I was born too :P

Probably a lot later but "It's the bottle or me" on Gamble is another brilliant record by her - Interesting that It's A side, "You're gonna miss me (when I'm gone) was originally the B side to "What kind of lady"

Karen

Edited by sanquine
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Guest TONY ROUNCE

Deep dark secret - Fab record :thumbsup: and recorded the year I was born too :thumbsup:

Probably a lot later but "It's the bottle or me" on Gamble is another brilliant record by her - Interesting that It's A side, "You're gonna miss me (when I'm gone) was originally the B side to "What kind of lady"

Karen

Hi Karen,

"The Bottle Or Me" was the 'A' Side of Dee Dee's second and final Gamble single, the Gamble demos all have that song on both sides. There are no double sided demos of "You're Gonna Miss Me"...

While I'm here I'd like to fly in the face of the considered wisdom, both here and elsewhere on this posting, that "Deep Dark Secret" is brilliant. It is what it is - nothing but a B side, and in this case a B-side to the totally superlative (and understatedly titled) "Good", a profoundly superior work in every way and one of the best records Bob Crewe ever wrote or produced...

There, I've said it and I'm glad!

TONE :P

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It is what it is - nothing but a B side.

TONE :thumbsup:

I thought I was the only one who felt like that.

I'm partial to her Cameo outing There Ain't Nothin' (I wouldn't do for you) though.

Mick

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While I'm here I'd like to fly in the face of the considered wisdom, both here and elsewhere on this posting, that "Deep Dark Secret" is brilliant. It is what it is - nothing but a B side, and in this case a B-side to the totally superlative (and understatedly titled) "Good", a profoundly superior work in every way and one of the best records Bob Crewe ever wrote or produced...

There, I've said it and I'm glad!

TONE :thumbsup:

Joanna :thumbsup: as you know Dee Dee is one of my very favourite artists ! 'The Night', her version of 'I'll o Anything' 'What Kind Of Lady' 'Easy Money' and ' I Really Love You' are amongst my favourite records

Tone - agreed totally about 'Good' - Dee Dee sounds great, the better side for me too....and it's one I was playing at 'The Rocket' just before the other side got really popular !

Seems like Cameo were pretty good at cover versions and jumping on the biggest sounds of the moment (i.e. Motown !), which I suppose is why Dee Dee's 'Mashed Potato Time' sounds like 'Please Mr Postman' , 'The 81' sounds like a Martha Reeves record and Dee Dee's great and very under rated 'Lets Twine' sounds like 'Alvin Cash's 'Twine Time' !

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Hi Colin,

I can't see why you don't get that from my original posting but yes, that's excatly what I am saying - two artists, same studio, same day, same session. Split sessions were not uncommon in the 50s and 60s. Quite often a label would want an artist to go in to cut just a new single and its B side. Usually sessions were usually booked out in blocks of three hours and four songs were expected to be recorded in that three hours so if artist A only had an A and B side to cut, artist B would record a couple of songs, too.

Thus Dee Dee recorded her two songs (the other being "It's A Funny Situation") and Chubby recorded his two songs, all in the same session and all in Chicago's Universal Studios, I believe...

TONE :thumbsup:

Wow! I mean wow! Totally F*%&ing wow! WOW! WOW!

Two of my all time faves. Like you say Tone, not a bad day's work eh? Awesome production on both.

Thanks for that.

Colin

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Wow! I mean wow! Totally F*%&ing wow! WOW! WOW!

Two of my all time faves. Like you say Tone, not a bad day's work eh? Awesome production on both.

Thanks for that.

Colin

=======

i played her 'happy about the whole thing ' recently intown

on TSOP

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Hi Colin,

I can't see why you don't get that from my original posting but yes, that's excatly what I am saying - two artists, same studio, same day, same session. Split sessions were not uncommon in the 50s and 60s. Quite often a label would want an artist to go in to cut just a new single and its B side. Usually sessions were usually booked out in blocks of three hours and four songs were expected to be recorded in that three hours so if artist A only had an A and B side to cut, artist B would record a couple of songs, too.

Thus Dee Dee recorded her two songs (the other being "It's A Funny Situation") and Chubby recorded his two songs, all in the same session and all in Chicago's Universal Studios, I believe...

TONE :ohmy:

Tony, I'm unable to locate my copy of the Orlons "Envy" as I write but unless my memory is fading I'm sure the flip side (bearing in mind it got issued twice) also has Barrett Strong and possibly Sonny Sanders credits on it, which leads me to believe that Cameo must have had a deal happening, for a short time at least in '64/65 , with the Chicago studios/production team at Universal ... ??? Universal around the same time were recording for Mary Wells after her departure from Motown weren't they ?

As for Dee Dee and Chubby actually going to Chicago to record , I must defer to your superior knowledge and experience, but with Cameo's well known history of rather dubious recording and business practices, I couldn't imagine Cameo going to the expense of sending their acts to Chicago but rather think that perhaps they merely recorded the vocals in Philly over the Chicago backing tracks ? :thumbsup:

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