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Steve S 60

Diesel Cheaper Than Petrol

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Not before time.  Hopefully a return to the days when diesel was always cheaper than petrol.  I often had the suspicion that the oil companies hiked up the price of diesel when diesel engine cars started to become popular.  I've noticed diesel being up to 10p a litre dearer than petrol at some garages in the past but recently it's a couple of pence.

http://news.sky.com/story/1521903/diesel-cut-fuels-price-war-at-pumps

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Not before time.  Hopefully a return to the days when diesel was always cheaper than petrol.  I often had the suspicion that the oil companies hiked up the price of diesel when diesel engine cars started to become popular.  I've noticed diesel being up to 10p a litre dearer than petrol at some garages in the past but recently it's a couple of pence.

http://news.sky.com/story/1521903/diesel-cut-fuels-price-war-at-pumps

It's cheaper in Spain Steve, and much cheaper in Gibraltar, but maybe a tad too far to come to get the tank filled:wicked:

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It's cheaper in Spain Steve, and much cheaper in Gibraltar, but maybe a tad too far to come to get the tank filled:wicked:

Just slightly out the way, Dave.  Our town is a rip off for fuel.  You wouldn't think we were sited on the crossroads of the M6 and A66.  I try and fill up when I'm in a different area.

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Just gone back to A petrol car as find derv in general dirty slow smelly & noisy ! Used 2 hate fueling up !

Edited by hornet

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Just slightly out the way, Dave.  Our town is a rip off for fuel.  You wouldn't think we were sited on the crossroads of the M6 and A66.  I try and fill up when I'm in a different area.

The price was down 1.5 cents on Saturdays price today, so it might be a good sign, unless it's a sign that the Euro is slipping further down the pan.

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Diesel is as far as I'm aware less refined than petrol, so in theory it's cheaper to produce. Diesel was always cheaper than petrol until the Tories in the eighties decided that people with diesel car's filled up less than their petrol counterparts so decided to up the price so they received more taxes and unfortunately it stayed that why up until now. The same has just happened with road tax. The tax recovery has fallen by people buying diesel car's which pollute less so they paid tax on emissions. But now this Tory rip off government ups all road tax unless it's electric only.

Steve

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The price was down 1.5 cents on Saturdays price today, so it might be a good sign, unless it's a sign that the Euro is slipping further down the pan.

Best exchange rate for years.  My mother just got 1.4 Euros to the £ for her trip to Majorca next month.

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Diesel is as far as I'm aware less refined than petrol, so in theory it's cheaper to produce. Diesel was always cheaper than petrol until the Tories in the eighties decided that people with diesel car's filled up less than their petrol counterparts so decided to up the price so they received more taxes and unfortunately it stayed that way up until now. The same has just happened with road tax. The tax recovery has fallen by people buying diesel car's which pollute less so they paid tax on emissions. But now this Tory rip off government ups all road tax unless it's electric only.

Steve

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Best exchange rate for years.  My mother just got 1.4 Euros to the £ for her trip to Majorca next month.

Is she flying from Luton Airport? Probably doesn't sound right unless said by Lorraine Chase.  Though not good for me on 120 Euros an hour.

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Is she flying from Luton Airport? Probably doesn't sound right unless said by Lorraine Chase.  Though not good for me on 120 Euros an hour.

Manchester.  I'll probably get roped in to drive her down there, unless she's getting the train.  You won't have to put many hours in on that rate, Dave.  I take it that's tattooing?  My first tattoo cost me a fiver back in '79.

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Manchester.  I'll probably get roped in to drive her down there, unless she's getting the train.  You won't have to put many hours in on that rate, Dave.  I take it that's tattooing?  My first tattoo cost me a fiver back in '79.

Yes, been my job for 30 years now, so haven't had to work that hard, my first cost me £1.50 in 74.

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Basically, I derive maintenance strategies for military equipment.  The maintenance is based on the consequences of failure, as well as the way things physically fail.  If a failure has little or no consequence, then you can choose to let it fail, this being the more cost effective option.  If on the other hand there could be safety or operational consequences, then you either need to prevent the failure, or manage the consequences.  The methodology started off in the aviation world back in the 70s, but it's been adopted by a lot of industries.  I was introduced to RCM in the mid 90s whilst still in the RN.  It's a more common sense approach to maintenance than just following the manufacturers recommendations.  I've derived maintenance schedules for systems and equipment on various classes of warship, aircraft, submarines and military vehicles.  As a facilitator you're in charge of a study group that includes the operators, maintainers and manufacturers.  You ask the group the right questions and they should be able to provide the answers, and between everybody, you should come up with the best way to maintain the equipment.  I'm currently working as an analyst, so I don't have a study group, just myself and a load of drawings and manuals.  Looking at the refrigeration plant on a Logistic Support Vessel for the Norwegian navy, British design, being built in Korea by Daewoo.  If I have any questions, an e-mail gets fired off to the yard in Korea.  A few things get lost in translation, but on the whole the Koreans are quite good.  Well Dave, you did ask, but don't worry, I don't have to kill you.

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Basically, I derive maintenance strategies for military equipment.  The maintenance is based on the consequences of failure, as well as the way things physically fail.  If a failure has little or no consequence, then you can choose to let it fail, this being the more cost effective option.  If on the other hand there could be safety or operational consequences, then you either need to prevent the failure, or manage the consequences.  The methodology started off in the aviation world back in the 70s, but it's been adopted by a lot of industries.  I was introduced to RCM in the mid 90s whilst still in the RN.  It's a more common sense approach to maintenance than just following the manufacturers recommendations.  I've derived maintenance schedules for systems and equipment on various classes of warship, aircraft, submarines and military vehicles.  As a facilitator you're in charge of a study group that includes the operators, maintainers and manufacturers.  You ask the group the right questions and they should be able to provide the answers, and between everybody, you should come up with the best way to maintain the equipment.  I'm currently working as an analyst, so I don't have a study group, just myself and a load of drawings and manuals.  Looking at the refrigeration plant on a Logistic Support Vessel for the Norwegian navy, British design, being built in Korea by Daewoo.  If I have any questions, an e-mail gets fired off to the yard in Korea.  A few things get lost in translation, but on the whole the Koreans are quite good.  Well Dave, you did ask, but don't worry, I don't have to kill you.

I know how to get my tattoo machines working if something goes wrong, and I can handle secateurs and loppers when it comes to bonsai, but above that technically I'm a retard, so everything in your post when completely over my head, and I'm quite glad to admit it.  I look at life through vodka glasses, they suit me best.

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Basically, I derive maintenance strategies for military equipment.  The maintenance is based on the consequences of failure, as well as the way things physically fail.  If a failure has little or no consequence, then you can choose to let it fail, this being the more cost effective option.  If on the other hand there could be safety or operational consequences, then you either need to prevent the failure, or manage the consequences.  The methodology started off in the aviation world back in the 70s, but it's been adopted by a lot of industries.  I was introduced to RCM in the mid 90s whilst still in the RN.  It's a more common sense approach to maintenance than just following the manufacturers recommendations.  I've derived maintenance schedules for systems and equipment on various classes of warship, aircraft, submarines and military vehicles.  As a facilitator you're in charge of a study group that includes the operators, maintainers and manufacturers.  You ask the group the right questions and they should be able to provide the answers, and between everybody, you should come up with the best way to maintain the equipment.  I'm currently working as an analyst, so I don't have a study group, just myself and a load of drawings and manuals.  Looking at the refrigeration plant on a Logistic Support Vessel for the Norwegian navy, British design, being built in Korea by Daewoo.  If I have any questions, an e-mail gets fired off to the yard in Korea.  A few things get lost in translation, but on the whole the Koreans are quite good.  Well Dave, you did ask, but don't worry, I don't have to kill you.

This sounds really interesting - if not a little over my head. I'm a forward thinking sort of guy - so, how can I apply some of this process/learning to the housing/homelessness charity that I work for?

it's a serious question.

P

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This sounds really interesting - if not a little over my head. I'm a forward thinking sort of guy - so, how can I apply some of this process/learning to the housing/homelessness charity that I work for?

it's a serious question.

P

Don't think it would be much use to you Peter.  The process is designed for machinery.  Having said that, the skills required to be a good facilitator can be used in all walks of life, as it's primarily about managing a team and getting the best out of them.  PM on its way.. 

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always found this useful Steve, you can download it as an app also... http://www.petrolprices.com/

 

mal

Thanks Mal, just signed up.  Normally use Shell, but may switch to BP as it's 2p a litre cheaper, although the BP garage is at the other end of town.  Don't use supermarket fuel, as I consider it to be false economy, just doesn't return the same MPG as the major brands.  I actually put this to the test when I was doing the same long distance journey regularly, and compared Esso diesel with Tesco.  The fuel economy dropped considerably with the supermarket fuel, wiping out any potential savings made at the pump.

 

 

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Ive used that for years, there will be certain stations that always return the cheapest fuel, whats good is it highlights where not to go... I agree on Super Market fuel, they water it down...  somehow????

Mal

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