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Chitlins - ever eaten them?

Freebasing KevinKent

 
Posted

I thought 'chitlins' was an American term for some unknown-to-me foodstuff invariably eaten by struggling black musicians years ago.  So imagine my surprise when my mother recently said to me "..and we used to have chitlins....". :ohmy:  I even had to google it to find out what I'd eaten.

Knowing that we lost my father when I was four, and that we were living on the breadline even before his death, it really shouldn't have surprised me.  I know we got a sheeps head from the local butcher regularly "for the dog" - when the brain was for me and we shared the meat off it. Other delicacies were tripe, bread and dripping, stewed eels and whatever neighbours would leave on the doorstep.

But ....Chitlins...?  Anyone else tried them?

:hatsoff2:- Kev

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Posted

My old chap used to love chitterlings , bloody things used to stink the house out and he was banned from bringing them home when the rest of us ganged up in protest ... :lol:

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Posted

Not a chance

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Posted

Is it Intestines ?? if it is I had some once down at the Cons Club , the Barman and one of the punters were cutting up these white tube thing and having them with Vinegar and Pepper , they then asked me if I fancied a try and being a greedy bastard said yes !

Me no like :lol:

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Posted

I'm Black and don't eat no chitlins,nasty things...ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhgggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, SWIFTY said:

Is it Intestines ??

Yes Swifty, here's an interesting article on them : http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/ChitlinsHistory.

" Animal innards have long been treasured foods around the world. Scotland's national dish is haggis (sheep's stomach stuffed with the animal's minced heart, liver, and lungs). Throughout Europe, tripe (cow or ox stomach) is popular, and French chefs in upscale restaurants serve dishes based on cow's brains and kidneys. "

I'm living in a rural area and 30 years ago every farm had one or two pigs, which fed the family during the whole year. So I ate chitlins in my younger days, and I liked it. Now I can eat some at friends' tables but I don't buy them. Though they're still very appreciated amongst population.

Edited by Philippe

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Posted

I may have forgotten what they taste like or even look like, but none of you guys are tempting me to try them again!

:hatsoff2:- Kev

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Posted

If any of you have a family type Tibetan place near you they cook this stuff quite well. 

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Posted
On 30/03/2016 at 20:12, SWIFTY said:

Is it Intestines ?? if it is I had some once down at the Cons Club , the Barman and one of the punters were cutting up these white tube thing and having them with Vinegar and Pepper , they then asked me if I fancied a try and being a greedy bastard said yes !

Me no like :lol:

Cons Club

Nooooooooooooooooo!

Never had em mesen - chitlins that is.

 

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Posted

My dad used to have them....bloody revolting!.....mind you he still tells me how nice pigs brain is and shame you still can't get it (back to the days when they had the family pig and ate it all apart from its snout)....the good old days ey, well maybe not everything....kind regards Rob

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Posted

They used to sell chitterlings and jot on the market in Gt Yarmouth when i was a kid.Which is basicly a pigs interior tubing and cows stomach.

My nanny loved the shit.

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Posted
5 minutes ago, NCFC said:

They used to sell chitterlings and jot on the market in Gt Yarmouth when i was a kid.Which is basicly a pigs interior tubing and cows stomach.

My nanny loved the shit.

:lol:

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Posted
10 hours ago, Peter99 said:

Cons Club

Nooooooooooooooooo!

Never had em mesen - chitlins that is.

 

:lol: Mind you Pierre , it should really be called the 'Ex Cons Club' :thumbsup:

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Posted
1 hour ago, SWIFTY said:

:lol: Mind you Pierre , it should really be called the 'Ex Cons Club' :thumbsup:

That's better.

Hope you're well mate.

Pedro

:thumbsup:

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Posted

No, I haven't eaten Chittlin's, despite having been a part-time "Ghetto Child" on The South Side of Chicago, and attending a 50% African-American High School in nearby, South Chicago, and having mostly African-American friends.  I have neither eaten souse, nor head cheese, nor pickled pigs feet.  I even avoided it, while living in an all African-American commune (except for yours truly) in The San Francisco Bay Area.  I used the fact that those foods were not "Kosher" as an excuse.  Nobody was offended.  I raved about the peach cobbler, mustard and collard greens. 

But, I HAVE eaten Haggis while visiting Scotland.

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Posted
4 hours ago, RobbK said:

 

But, I HAVE eaten Haggis while visiting Scotland.

Rob, is Haggis Kosher? Not that it would bother me either way, I still wouldn't eat it.  Unless it was passed by the Vegan Society as being meat, dairy and cruelty free.

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1 minute ago, TattooDave said:

Rob, is Haggis Kosher? Not that it would bother me either way, I still wouldn't eat it.  Unless it was passed by the Vegan Society as being meat, dairy and cruelty free.

I doubt that Haggis is Kosher, but sheep meat is, in general, and I don't think intestines are outlawed, per se.  I don't really know.  I'm not religious and eat just about anything.  But I wouldn't try chittlin's, pickled pigs' feet, nor chocolate-covered insects, nor Soylant Green, nor okra (nor anything else that's slimy or very unappetizing-looking.

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Posted

I even refused the goat's eye at a banquet in my own honour in Jordan, at the risk of offending my hosts.  I had braced myself to try it.  But after looking at it, I had to decline.  My hosts understood, and didn't make a fuss over my cowardice.

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Posted

I had some, mistakenly, in France a few years ago. We went into a restaurant (without a dictionary) and I couldn't recognise anything so I plumped for 'andouillette' which, of course, turned out to be chitterlings. I managed about half of it before I decided enough was enough :(

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Missing Link said:

I had some, mistakenly, in France a few years ago. We went into a restaurant (without a dictionary) and I couldn't recognise anything so I plumped for 'andouillette' which, of course, turned out to be chitterlings. I managed about half of it before I decided enough was enough :(

Yes in France we have plenty of "charcuteries" (English word ?) made with chitlins, each province has its specialty. In fact it's a part of our culture.

In my area "boudins" are very popular : https://books.google.fr/books?id=p5nhpRfaDpIC&pg=PT62&lpg=PT62&dq=boudin+delicatessen&source=bl&ots=E-YPN9uhN1&sig=izhFvfV8V-IWZihZqzMZXYjuxhQ&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSuabAjvPLAhUK1BoKHS5bAd0Q6AEIMzAC#v=onepage&q=boudin%20delicatessen&f=false

 

Edited by Philippe

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1 hour ago, Philippe said:

Yes in France we have plenty of "charcuteries" (English word ?) made with chitlins, each province has its specialty. In fact it's a part of our culture.

In my area "boudins" are very popular : https://books.google.fr/books?id=p5nhpRfaDpIC&pg=PT62&lpg=PT62&dq=boudin+delicatessen&source=bl&ots=E-YPN9uhN1&sig=izhFvfV8V-IWZihZqzMZXYjuxhQ&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSuabAjvPLAhUK1BoKHS5bAd0Q6AEIMzAC#v=onepage&q=boudin%20delicatessen&f=false

 

It was in the Haute-Savoie region.

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59 minutes ago, Philippe said:

Yes in France we have plenty of "charcuteries" (English word ?) made with chitlins, each province has its specialty. In fact it's a part of our culture.

In my area "boudins" are very popular : https://books.google.fr/books?id=p5nhpRfaDpIC&pg=PT62&lpg=PT62&dq=boudin+delicatessen&source=bl&ots=E-YPN9uhN1&sig=izhFvfV8V-IWZihZqzMZXYjuxhQ&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjSuabAjvPLAhUK1BoKHS5bAd0Q6AEIMzAC#v=onepage&q=boudin%20delicatessen&f=false

 

I don't think there is a single word for charcuteries in the English language.  In Yiddish and German there is delicat essen (delicate (light) eating) or vorspeise (before the meal), in Italian, "Anti pasti (before pasta (before the big meal).  I assume we would call charcouteries light meat dishes, or hors d'euvres, or "cold cuts", - however, I believe charcouteries can be either cold or warm.

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2 hours ago, RobbK said:

I don't think there is a single word for charcuteries in the English language.  In Yiddish and German there is delicat essen (delicate (light) eating) or vorspeise (before the meal), in Italian, "Anti pasti (before pasta (before the big meal).  I assume we would call charcouteries light meat dishes, or hors d'euvres, or "cold cuts", - however, I believe charcouteries can be either cold or warm.

You're right Robb, hee's a French link about them : https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcuterie

 

Le terme charcuterie désigne couramment de nombreuses préparations alimentaires à base de viande et d'abats, crues ou cuites. Elles proviennent majoritairement, mais pas exclusivement, du porc, dont presque tous les éléments peuvent être utilisés, et ont souvent le sel comme agent de conservation (salaison, saumure)

Translated by Reverso as : The term delicatessen usually indicates(appoints) numerous food preparations with meat and with giblets, raw or cooked. They result(come) mainly, but not exclusively, from the pork(pig), whose all the elements almost can be used, and often have the salt for preservative agent (salting(salt meat), brine)

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Posted

I still love dripping on toast and tripe, when I was a kid I used to eat cowheel, hodge and chitlins as well. I can't remember what they tasted or looked like though. Pigs trotters were OK taste wise but very messy, only tried pigs brain once but wasn't keen. I discovered tinned haggis a couple of months ago, it's a lot better than I was expecting.

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1 hour ago, CRUMB said:

I still love dripping on toast and tripe, when I was a kid I used to eat cowheel, hodge and chitlins as well. I can't remember what they tasted or looked like though. Pigs trotters were OK taste wise but very messy, only tried pigs brain once but wasn't keen. I discovered tinned haggis a couple of months ago, it's a lot better than I was expecting.

You need to try haggis freshly made.

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Posted

I have, my mate brought me one back from Scotland but I didn't think much of it.

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The tale grandma used to tell was of buying a sheep's head in the Depression and it always went something like "I'll have a sheeps head......and leave the eyes in to see us through the week". Apparently the process of making sheep's head broth stinks the house out. I love liver and will eat kidney but the tripe and all that is just nasty.

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