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in town Mikey

Quality Of The Vinyl

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Is it me, or have some other SSers noticed the amount of poor quality of some of the vinyl, and Styrene, in some records in boxes of late?

I try not to look at too many boxes this side of Christmas, but I really have seen some records in awful condition over the last 6 months.

OK I know sometimes it can look terrible, and play great, or look great and play like they were cooking bacon and eggs in the studio.

Obviously as time marches on, and we get further and further away from the years most of the records we like were recorded the quality is going to become increasingly poor. But if I were selling these records I would be embarrased to ask for money for them.

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Is it me, or have some other SSers noticed the amount of poor quality of some of the vinyl, and Styrene,  in some records in boxes of late?

I try not to look at too many boxes this side of Christmas, but I really have seen some records in awful condition over the last 6 months.

OK I know sometimes it can look terrible, and play great, or look great and play like they were cooking bacon and eggs in the studio.

Obviously as time marches on, and we get further and further away from the years most of the records we like were recorded the quality is going to become increasingly poor. But if I were selling these records I would be embarrased to ask for money for them.

link

I think it what you would call scrapping the bottom of the barrel in the US now. Years ago you would not bother bringing records back if they were in poor condition because to no one would buy them - remember a £20record now, would be 50p in good condition and if it was knackered you wouldn't want to run the risk of paying the import duty on them. If they were a big sound I'd bring them back and snap out the label and stick them on my record box. Like all collectables, the long term demand & money will follow the items in the best condition

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I think it what you would call scrapping the bottom of the barrel in the US now. Years ago you would not  bother bringing  records back if they were in poor condition because to no one would buy them - remember a £20record now, would be 50p in good condition and if it was knackered you wouldn't want to run the risk of paying the import duty on them. If they were a big sound I'd bring them back and snap out the label and stick them on my record box. Like all collectables, the long term demand & money will follow the items in the best condition

link

I think part of the problem is vinyl as an out dated medium, in the 80's and 90's there were a lot more record stores here in the States and it was easier to find better vinyl in general because people used it and took care of it. You also had the factor of old stock at these record stores which would be discovered, now that these shops are all but gone and the only sources are house sales and thrift stores the records are not taken care of as much as an individual who plays records would look after them. The further away from the original owner the worse these records are going to get.

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I think part of the problem is vinyl as an out dated medium, in the 80's and 90's there were a lot  more record stores here in the States and it was easier to find better vinyl in general because people used it and took care of it. You also had the factor of old stock at these record stores which would be discovered, now that these shops are all but gone and the only sources are house sales and thrift stores the records are not taken care of as much as an individual who plays records would look after them. The further away from the original owner the worse these records are going to get.

link

Well, while I understand your point, I'm still constantly amazed by the amount of 45s available from the states that arrive at through my letterbox looking pretty much unplayed.

And nobody owns a 40 or 50 year old CD yet do they? Wouldn't it be ironic if they just corrupted themselves after 50 years. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

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Well, while I understand your point, I'm still constantly amazed by the amount of 45s available from the states that arrive at through my letterbox looking pretty much unplayed.

And nobody owns a 40 or 50 year old CD yet do they? Wouldn't it be ironic if they just corrupted themselves after 50 years.  :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:

link

For some perspective I went record shopping this weekend and found maybe 7 in arguably M- to vg+ condition.

I found maybe 50 copies in good to Vg or worse, most of which were the better records.

Of course I only payed 3 for 1 dollar for the beat up ones,

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In the past year, especially on Ebay there have been untold thousands of records in like new condition. I personally, only very rarely bid on or buy anything that isn't described as M-, except from a few selected dealers I have come to know and trust. After all in almost any collecting world condition is paramount. Nothing worse than a long time want finally arriving through your letter box, only to look as though it's been run over by a steamroller.

Just a tip, it's worth giving new arrivals a wipe with a soft cloth (J cloth)with some washing up liquid and warm water, drying off with a kitchen towel to enhance your aural experience.

Paul

SITC

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And nobody owns a 40 or 50 year old CD yet do they? Wouldn't it be ironic if they just corrupted themselves after 50 years.  :thumbsup:   :thumbsup:   :P

link

I understand that there have already been problems with older CDs oxidising and turning a sort of copper colour. I believe that they then become unplayable, but might be wrong on that. Yet another piece of half developed technology foisted on the consumer. :thumbsup:

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I understand that there have already been problems with older CDs oxidising and turning a sort of copper colour.  I believe that they then become unplayable, but might be wrong on that.  Yet another piece of half developed technology foisted on the consumer.   :thumbsup:

link

can't remember the exact age they go off but know it was suprising espically when remember that at first they were billed as lifelong -

Remember when format first come out there was a lot of people saying they transfered their vinyl to cd format and sold vinyl on , wonder what they are thinking now

Of course clever people would have backed them up into mp3 format, so sorted?

Yep, sorted almost - but what did you store mp3s on .....not cds? :thumbsup:

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I'm not really that bothered if CDs die. I have about as much respect for them as I do compact cassettes.

There's a difference between having a copy of a tune and owning a record. You can usually get a copy of a song on some format or other if you need to and I guess that's the way it will always be.

Godz

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But like the dinosaur, there may be one or two that survive extinction?

I think their longevity is dictated by the quality of the laquer applied during manufacture, and early deterioration has been associated with particular production plants, but eventually they will all go to crap. And in the meantime the record industry wants to prevent home recording of anything and inhibits the introduction of new recording formats. Bunch of utter shites! :angry:

Vinyl forever!

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