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Russell Gilbert

Show us your great photos (2017)

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. I have never seen Red Admiral Butterflies in November before but I saw two today.  Anyone know anything about there habits, hibernation, migration etc ? Would love to find out off you knowledgeable people on here

Steve

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3 hours ago, Winsford Soul said:

Thanks for posting Russell. As you say some very good photographs but in my humble opinion like yours, there's better pictures posted  on here . I was under the same impression regarding the BBC Country file calendar .

Steve

Hmm, I see what you mean about the Countryfile calendar. They seem to have gone for a number of cute animal shots rather than ones that are outstandingly good. 

Clearly our expectations are higher - but only because we've been treated to so many fantastic photos during the three years these "Show us your great photos" threads have been running. 

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Red Admirals

 

I have found them what i thought was hibernating in the school bolierhouse in sept. only trouble is when the boilers kick in in Oct it wakes them up and they seem to die,more info below from google.

The Red Admiral is a frequent visitor to gardens throughout the British Isles and one of our most well-known butterflies. This butterfly is unmistakable, with the velvety black wings intersected by striking red bands.

This butterfly is primarily a migrant to our shores, although sightings of individuals and immature stages in the first few months of the year, especially in the south of England, mean that this butterfly is now considered resident. This resident population is considered to only be a small fraction of the population seen in the British Isles, which gets topped up every year with migrants arriving in May and June that originate in central Europe. Unfortunately, most individuals are unable to survive our winter, especially in the cooler regions of the British Isles.

The number of adults seen in any one year is therefore dependent on the number of migrants reaching the British Isles and numbers fluctuate as a result. In some years this butterfly can be widespread and common, in others rather local and scarce. This is a widespread species and can be found anywhere in the British Isles, including Orkney and Shetland.

Edited by smudger

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5 hours ago, Winsford Soul said:

Dunnock, in dappled sunlight

Steve

IB2A4032 (2).JPG

Great photo - very shallow depth of field though. Was that intentional or the result of a quick snatch? (No sniggers from those at the back please!)

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9 hours ago, Russell Gilbert said:

Great photo - very shallow depth of field though. Was that intentional or the result of a quick snatch? (No sniggers from those at the back please!)

Thanks Russell.  It was intended mate shot the picture at f4 to blur out a very messy background  which as you know results in the shallow depth of field 

Steve 

Edited by Winsford Soul

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13 hours ago, Winsford Soul said:

Thanks Russell.  It was intended mate shot the picture at f4 to blur out a very messy background  which as you know results in the shallow depth of field 

Steve 

It's certainly really helped isolate the subject, which is the whole point, of course. :thumbsup:

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On ‎01‎/‎12‎/‎2017 at 18:57, Winsford Soul said:

Dunnock, in dappled sunlight

Steve

IB2A4032 (2).JPG

One of my favourite birds that visit my feeders , on first look they seem very dowdy but the greys and browns of their plumage are really attractive on closer inspection.

 

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