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mike

Young Soul Rebels - Look At British Soul 2006

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The young soul rebels

They're loud, they're proud - and they're not interested in what the major labels have to say. Elle J Small meets the women blazing their own trail with a genre-busting new brand of British soul

been passed on an interesting online article http://observer.guardian.co.uk/review/stor...1928208,00.html

have to say found the mention of soul source a bit suprising, but thought worth a pass on none the less, and have to say the line "'I get stick for being a white Scot singing soul,' singer-songwriter L-Marie chuckles in her thick Glaswegian accent. " did make me smile as brought to mind a past post on here

:thumbsup:

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Young soul rebels - mica paris - big life ysr promo 1

10955 refosoul

As you mentioned Young Soul Rebels, here's a tune entitled just that. It's used in a U.K. film about Soul music in the U.K. Top film!!Martin

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Young soul rebels - mica paris - big life ysr promo 1

10955 refosoul

As you mentioned Young Soul Rebels, here's a tune entitled just that. It's used in a U.K. film about Soul music in the U.K. Top film!!Martin

...Actually it's an appalling film, riddled from top to bottom with factual inaccuracies and with one of the worst lead performances I've seen in more than 50 years of going to the flicks, man and boy. Apart from that, it's brilliant :yes:

TONE

Edited by TONY ROUNCE

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...Actually it's an appalling film, riddled from top to bottom with factual inaccuracies and with one of the worst lead performances I've seen in more than 50 years of going to the flicks, man and boy. Apart from that, it's brilliant :lamsey:

TONE

Like the song says, there's a message in this music. There's a history of this country hidden in it's seductive rhythms to. Let it take you back to 1977 - the year that the two sevens clashed and the red white and blue briefly gave way to red, gold and green - changing what England was and what England's post imperial dreams could be. Forever.

Musical apartheid was placed on hold and Punk, Funk and Reggae entered each other, bringing that soulful summer of life. Anarchy in the U.K. felt like more than remote, subversive possibly. Young people discovered the possitive pleasures of saying 'up yours' to bondage in general and racism in particular. Black and white cemented a fragile togetherness on the dancefloor. The special appeal of this alien cultural blend would eventually provide a means to knock back Britain's neo-nazis and their future patriotic ideas about how to clean up the country.

From the forties pastiche of Dr Buzzard's Band to exhilarating fusion experiments of Charles Earland, Eddie Henderson and Roy Ayres these tunes were once the uncut, imported dance grooves that echoed over rebel airwaves and spilled out of clubland onto frontline streets. They were Soul Power's syncopated contributions to the soundtrack of an alternative jubilee - one that celebrated taking the great out of Britain - where Sylvester was queen and Dr Funkenstein reigned beside him over a nation in step to a utopian groove.

Of course the punks were wrong. There was a future. But that summer saw to it that the meaning of being English would never be the same again. Nobody would have believed that, fourteen years later, the party would still be swinging. The rest is up to you. :tumbleweed3::thumbsup:

Martin

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