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Peter99

I'd like a new bike!

Evening All

I'm going to treat myself to a decent bike - I need to try and get out a bit. I guess I'm looking for a really light weight, fast, mountain mountain bike. I wont be doing any hard core off roading - maybe some old farm tracks, woods and probably mainly canal towpath. I'm not very fit and no pro!

I've had a look at the following Cube Acid Mountain Bike, Scott Aspect, Boardman Team and a Felt 750.

Any recommendations from cyclists in the know would be appreciated. I would also be happy to purchase a good second hand bike if anyone has one for sale - cash waiting and I'm dead easy to deal with.

Any replies would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Pete

:thumbsup:

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5 minutes ago, Peter99 said:

Evening All

I'm going to treat myself to a decent bike - I need to try and get out a bit. I guess I'm looking for a really light weight, fast, mountain mountain bike. I wont be doing any hard core off roading - maybe some old farm tracks, woods and probably mainly canal towpath. I'm not very fit and no pro!

I've had a look at the following Cube Acid Mountain Bike, Scott Aspect, Boardman Team and a Felt 750.

Any recommendations from cyclists in the know would be appreciated. I would also be happy to purchase a good second hand bike if anyone has one for sale - cash waiting and I'm dead easy to deal with.

Any replies would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Pete

:thumbsup:

Had A Boardman pro 29er last year , bloody luv it ! 

IMG_0299.JPG

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Trek remedy here its more capable than me so i've managed to scare myself a few times....

 

the large discount i got was a big factor i was looking a quite a few brands when i went for this there are so many good bikes to choose from.

 

giant anthem, whyte do some great bikes

 

do you want full suss or a hardtail ?

 

 

IMG_0027.JPG

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If you are eligible for 'cycle to work' scheme this will make a considerable saving for you.

Check it out.

Adam.

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Looking at your request maybe a hardtail would do all you want.

 

but for the odd time you fancy some rougher bumpy downhill tracks a full suss would have you grinning from ear to ear.

 

most of what i ride a hardtail would be fine but for the odd times i wanted to be covered.

 

my wife now has a nice bike she inheited when i got my 2 nd one.

 

they are like records you always want more.

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Thanks everyone. I shall review in the morning.

 

Pete

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GP or SX 200 would do me  :hatsoff2:

Steve

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11 hours ago, dylan said:

Trek remedy here its more capable than me so i've managed to scare myself a few times....

 

the large discount i got was a big factor i was looking a quite a few brands when i went for this there are so many good bikes to choose from.

 

giant anthem, whyte do some great bikes

 

do you want full suss or a hardtail ?

 

 

IMG_0027.JPG

Yes full sus I think. My current bike hurts my ass!

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19 minutes ago, Peter99 said:

Yes full sus I think. My current bike hurts my ass!

Try one of these Peter.  It's like a hammock for your arse.....

595216c90b1a1_r1015677(1).thumb.jpg.506ef5c58b638ea585b3b518b2238a70.jpg

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42 minutes ago, Peter99 said:

Yes full sus I think. My current bike hurts my ass!

There's a reason why it hurts your a***.   I'm sensing deja vu?   :g:

hard tails?full sus? hammocks?  :ohmy:

And I still can't get my head around the obsession/linkage between "mountain" bikes and canal tow paths. I always thought canals went around mountains not over them. :)  

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1 hour ago, Peter99 said:

Yes full sus I think. My current bike hurts my ass!

i love getting out on mine in the countryside can ride for a couple of hours and not see a sole.  Good to clear the head.

 

where do you live do you have good hills and terrain on your doorstep ?

 

 

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4 minutes ago, dylan said:

i love getting out on mine in the countryside can ride for a couple of hours and not see a sole.  Good to clear the head.

 

where do you live do you have good hills and terrain on your doorstep ?

 

 

I live in Nottingham near the Grantham Canal - can cycle pretty much all the way to Grantham. Also have lots of country parks and the National Water Sports Centre on my doorstep. 

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I am stapleford so cycle a lot round kimberley, ilkeston area and between jn25 to jn27

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42 minutes ago, Peter99 said:

I live in Nottingham near the Grantham Canal - can cycle pretty much all the way to Grantham. Also have lots of country parks and the National Water Sports Centre on my doorstep. 

How about a locally manufactured classic?  You'll totally own the towpaths on one of these beauties.  Cruise along in style and comfort....

chopper.jpg.dcf4ca766f4d782811a0fc839565494a.jpg

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Image result for penny farthing Bike with stabiliser

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44 minutes ago, SWIFTY said:

Image result for penny farthing Bike with stabiliser

:D

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I have a trek 8500 hardtail and use a suspension seat post, I live    by the canal too and changed the big fook off nobbly tyres for swalbe road tyres , less resistance and decent enough tread for lanes/canal paths etc

hydraulic disc brakes a must don't buy cable disc operated you'll be sorry 

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Like I said in the last epic bike thread: A road bike is the way to go. Peter, this post isn't aimed specifically at you but anyone who might be in the position of looking to buy a bike.  Last time i gave out lots of good advice. How it that  hybreoidal bike that everyone apart from me said was so brilliant going btw? :). How come you need a "decent" bike only a relatively short  later?

So the first thing anyone should do is visit a bike shop. Don't buy online unless you've seen the bike you want in a shop and are knowledgeable about exactly what it is you're getting. If you have it ask online about which bike to  get then you definitely shouldn't be buying online.

Buying from a shop allows you to strike up a relationship with the seller. Particularly advantageous if you need servicing/repair in the future or wish to trade for a different model.  This can be a large outfit like Decathlon or an independent backstreet business.  Take your time and look around. Obviously don't buy from anyone who is in any way ignorant or rude.  Often they have older models going at a cheaper price

The most important thing about buying from a reputable dealer is the service you will get. They will provide a bike to "fit" your body type (frame size) and then set it up so it is comfortable to ride (e.g. adjusting the seat/handlebars) specifically for you.

 This brings me onto the question of the seat. Most bikes in the entry level - £400 to £500 are going to be okay. The frames are usually pretty good but they have to cut costs somewhere and that's in the other components. E.g. the seat. many people don't  keep the seat that comes with the bike. replacing it for something more comfortable or something they're used to . In reality you should be able to haggle this into the price of the bike (plus a little more besides regrading extras).

This again comes back to buying from a retailer becasue when all this is done you should be able to test drive it before you hand one penny over

My views on bike types: Hybred - a waste of time really. For people who have difficulty deciding.  Ok for pottering around on but why would anyone spend large sums of  money to potter around? It doesn't make sense.  

Mountain bikes - for mountains/rough terrain specifically (the clue is in the title). This doesn't include many bikes that are made to look like mountain bike but which would probably snap in two if they went down a mountain.

Road bikes - for roads (ie any hard surface you could drive on). RBs are light, easy to maintain.  and get you from A to B with least amount of effort. Which means for  the same effort you exert on a hydredized or mountainal contraption you will go further and in more comfort on a decent road bike. That's the bottom line.

As for gimmicks like suspended bits and bobs. All this slows you down, makes the bike heavier and doesn't  really provide any real extra comfort anyway if you're on the road. A good steel frame will act as a shock absorber up to a point.

Last time I made the point about buying a decent second hand bike. Something like an old racer or tourer with a Reynolds 531 frame (high quality steel frame). Many of these bikes were top end years ago and still fetch reasonably good prices. Personally I'd choose one of these if I could get a well maintained one (usually in the £150 to £200 range) over all the entry level new £400 to £500. stuff going.

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28 minutes ago, maslar said:

Like I said in the last epic bike thread: A road bike is the way to go. Peter, this post isn't aimed specifically at you but anyone who might be in the position of looking to buy a bike.  Last time i gave out lots of good advice. How it that  hybreoidal bike that everyone apart from me said was so brilliant going btw? :). How come you need a "decent" bike only a relatively short  later?

So the first thing anyone should do is visit a bike shop. Don't buy online unless you've seen the bike you want in a shop and are knowledgeable about exactly what it is you're getting. If you have it ask online about which bike to  get then you definitely shouldn't be buying online.

Buying from a shop allows you to strike up a relationship with the seller. Particularly advantageous if you need servicing/repair in the future or wish to trade for a different model.  This can be a large outfit like Decathlon or an independent backstreet business.  Take your time and look around. Obviously don't buy from anyone who is in any way ignorant or rude.  Often they have older models going at a cheaper price

The most important thing about buying from a reputable dealer is the service you will get. They will provide a bike to "fit" your body type (frame size) and then set it up so it is comfortable to ride (e.g. adjusting the seat/handlebars) specifically for you.

 This brings me onto the question of the seat. Most bikes in the entry level - £400 to £500 are going to be okay. The frames are usually pretty good but they have to cut costs somewhere and that's in the other components. E.g. the seat. many people don't  keep the seat that comes with the bike. replacing it for something more comfortable or something they're used to . In reality you should be able to haggle this into the price of the bike (plus a little more besides regrading extras).

This again comes back to buying from a retailer becasue when all this is done you should be able to test drive it before you hand one penny over

My views on bike types: Hybred - a waste of time really. For people who have difficulty deciding.  Ok for pottering around on but why would anyone spend large sums of  money to potter around? It doesn't make sense.  

Mountain bikes - for mountains/rough terrain specifically (the clue is in the title). This doesn't include many bikes that are made to look like mountain bike but which would probably snap in two if they went down a mountain.

Road bikes - for roads (ie any hard surface you could drive on). RBs are light, easy to maintain.  and get you from A to B with least amount of effort. Which means for  the same effort you exert on a hydredized or mountainal contraption you will go further and in more comfort on a decent road bike. That's the bottom line.

As for gimmicks like suspended bits and bobs. All this slows you down, makes the bike heavier and doesn't  really provide any real extra comfort anyway if you're on the road. A good steel frame will act as a shock absorber up to a point.

Last time I made the point about buying a decent second hand bike. Something like an old racer or tourer with a Reynolds 531 frame (high quality steel frame). Many of these bikes were top end years ago and still fetch reasonably good prices. Personally I'd choose one of these if I could get a well maintained one (usually in the £150 to £200 range) over all the entry level new £400 to £500. stuff going.

I don't usually chip in on cycling topics! I do a reasonable amount of cycling and tend to agree with Maslar:thumbsup:

The only bit I would add is that I use one of my old cyclo-cross bikes for day-to-day training. In essence, they look like a road bike but usually come with knobbly/offroad tyres. As I use this bike on the road, I use smooth road tyres. The bikes are robust enough to take a fair old tanking off-road.

There is a healthy cyclo-cross scene in Notts and Derby and so plenty of shops to potentially access new or used cyclocross bikes. I personally avoid disc brakes.

Cycling is addictive and anyone with slightly obsessive tendencies needs to approach it with care.:excl:

 

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cycling isn't just about getting from a to b with the least effort in the fastest time though....

 

I will guess i will get just as fit averaging a slower speed on a mtb on singletrack than a person going much faster on a road bike.

 

i won't have traffic to deal with and the views will be just as good if not better.

 

and mtb's are more robust and when necessary can go onto a road but i wouldn't want to take a typical road racer onto singletrack.

 

I will end up on a road bike at some point just net yet.

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Posted (edited)
On 26/06/2017 at 21:27, Hornet said:

Had A Boardman pro 29er last year , bloody luv it ! 

IMG_0299.JPG

The  bike industry has gone bonkers , these bikes are selling On EBay £100 more than they cost new 4 years ago . 

Edited by Hornet

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post-17985-0-83668100-1411306726_thumb.jpgnobody wants spend 2K 4 A 2nd hand road bike tho 😥

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1 hour ago, Hornet said:

The  bike industry has gone bonkers , these bikes are selling On EBay £100 more than they cost new 4 years ago . 

I went into Halfords about a week ago it was empty of stock.  Literally 3 or 4 bikes and had to wait for a new delivery to be unloaded just to get some inner tubes.  It is crazy.

 

i am after a decent kids bike 24 or 26” wheels but might wait a while.

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On 27/06/2017 at 16:04, maslar said:

Like I said in the last epic bike thread: A road bike is the way to go. Peter, this post isn't aimed specifically at you but anyone who might be in the position of looking to buy a bike.  Last time i gave out lots of good advice. How it that  hybreoidal bike that everyone apart from me said was so brilliant going btw? :). How come you need a "decent" bike only a relatively short  later?

So the first thing anyone should do is visit a bike shop. Don't buy online unless you've seen the bike you want in a shop and are knowledgeable about exactly what it is you're getting. If you have it ask online about which bike to  get then you definitely shouldn't be buying online.

Buying from a shop allows you to strike up a relationship with the seller. Particularly advantageous if you need servicing/repair in the future or wish to trade for a different model.  This can be a large outfit like Decathlon or an independent backstreet business.  Take your time and look around. Obviously don't buy from anyone who is in any way ignorant or rude.  Often they have older models going at a cheaper price

The most important thing about buying from a reputable dealer is the service you will get. They will provide a bike to "fit" your body type (frame size) and then set it up so it is comfortable to ride (e.g. adjusting the seat/handlebars) specifically for you.

 This brings me onto the question of the seat. Most bikes in the entry level - £400 to £500 are going to be okay. The frames are usually pretty good but they have to cut costs somewhere and that's in the other components. E.g. the seat. many people don't  keep the seat that comes with the bike. replacing it for something more comfortable or something they're used to . In reality you should be able to haggle this into the price of the bike (plus a little more besides regrading extras).

This again comes back to buying from a retailer becasue when all this is done you should be able to test drive it before you hand one penny over

My views on bike types: Hybred - a waste of time really. For people who have difficulty deciding.  Ok for pottering around on but why would anyone spend large sums of  money to potter around? It doesn't make sense.  

Mountain bikes - for mountains/rough terrain specifically (the clue is in the title). This doesn't include many bikes that are made to look like mountain bike but which would probably snap in two if they went down a mountain.

Road bikes - for roads (ie any hard surface you could drive on). RBs are light, easy to maintain.  and get you from A to B with least amount of effort. Which means for  the same effort you exert on a hydredized or mountainal contraption you will go further and in more comfort on a decent road bike. That's the bottom line.

As for gimmicks like suspended bits and bobs. All this slows you down, makes the bike heavier and doesn't  really provide any real extra comfort anyway if you're on the road. A good steel frame will act as a shock absorber up to a point.

Last time I made the point about buying a decent second hand bike. Something like an old racer or tourer with a Reynolds 531 frame (high quality steel frame). Many of these bikes were top end years ago and still fetch reasonably good prices. Personally I'd choose one of these if I could get a well maintained one (usually in the £150 to £200 range) over all the entry level new £400 to £500. stuff going.

An E bike is the way 2 go , and B4 anyone chirps in its cheating I have probably done more miles backwards than most have done 4wards and A godsend 4 arthritis 

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