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woolie mark

World In Action documentary from 1976 about racists in Blackburn

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There are many who are into soul music who are racist or at the very least use racist language, including plenty who go to all-nighters etc.  Many don't associate the music with the struggle blacks had in the 60s and continue to have to this day.  I'm surprised so many seem surprised about this.

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The types you talk about don't really have any interest or feeling for soul music , surely they can't can they ?

25 minutes ago, chalky said:

There are many who are into soul music who are racist or at the very least use racist language, including plenty who go to all-nighters etc.  Many don't associate the music with the struggle blacks had in the 60s and continue to have to this day.  I'm surprised so many seem surprised about this.

 

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12 minutes ago, Spain pete said:

The types you talk about don't really have any interest or feeling for soul music , surely they can't can they ?

 

Maybe the language used was common in their formative years, whilst they were growing up, not that that is an excuse for using the words they do.  Of course they wouldn't use those words when talking to a black person.  As for the music, they are into it as much as most seem to be.....they also have an interest to delve further.  Maybe racist isn't the right word to use for them?  They don't have a deep hatred that eats away at them, not for blacks anyway.

Edited by chalky

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Would. It be right to say they have an interest in a bandwagon kind of way , because for me if you can't feel what the music is about then you can't really understand it or like it for that matter . 🎶🎶✌

2 hours ago, chalky said:

Maybe the language used was common in their formative years, whilst they were growing up, not that that is an excuse for using the words they do.  Of course they wouldn't use those words when talking to a black person.  As for the music, they are into it as much as most seem to be.....they also have an interest to delve further.  Maybe racist isn't the right word to use for them?  They don't have a deep hatred that eats away at them, not for blacks anyway.

 

Edited by Spain pete
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1 hour ago, Spain pete said:

Would. It be right to say they have an interest in a bandwagon kind of way , because for me if you can't feel what the music is about the you can't really understand it or like it for that matter . 🎶🎶✌

 

Nope long time soulies

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My impressions of racism from the 70's, are not what the general consensus appears to be. In the 70's white and Afro-Caribbean kids mixed together quite easily. Most racism at the time was usually directed at people from the Asian subcontinent. Obviously there were racists just based on the colour of a persons skin, but IMHO it was more nuanced than that. I would venture to suggest that much of today's racism has more to do with religion. 

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As it always has been it's the voice of the scared and the ignorant , whether it was targeted at the " M.V. Empire Windrush" generation , the Ugandan Asian refugees in '72 or more recently the Polish/Eastern european immigrants .

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12 hours ago, woolie mark said:

Stumbled across this on the BFI website here:  https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-the-national-party-1976-online

What amazes me is the one of the two neo-nazi lads, John Smyth and Martin Smethhurst, is wearing a jumper with a black-fist symbol on it.  They say that Hitler went "a bit too far".

 

70s.jpg

He either bought that jumper specially or got dressed in the dark! I would like to have heard his answer if the interviewer had asked him about it.

3: 00. "We want our country back", so thats where the brexiters got their vote winning slogan from.

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I didn't start this topic to get into a debate about current day racism, it just fascinated me that in 1976 somebody with overtly racist views was wearing a symbol which in this form is clearly derived from the 1960s US black power movement.

Of course he might not know this and only associate it with northern soul.  Just because he is wearing a symbol associated with northern soul this doesn't mean he was really interested in the music.  In the mid 70s the northern soul scene was at the cutting edge of the development of youth street fashion (before the jazz funk and punk scenes took youth clothing fashion off in different directions), so it may be he was just wearing what was "fashionable" in his area at that time.  Also, at that time there was a crossover between northern soul and mainstream chart music.  If you had gone to your local youth club a year or two or three earlier you probably have been listening to records by Johnny Johnson and the Bandwagon, Chairman of the Board, Curtis Mayfield, Robert Knight, etc (can't think of any other examples at the moment).  So it may be that "Footsee" was as "upfront" as he ever got?

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