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RICK SCOTT

If the term northern soul had not come about ?

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So, is there such a thing as Southern Soul? What were Londoners listening to in the early 70’s? Dave Godin really could have coined the term Northerners’ Soul as it was reputedly lads from north of London asking after U.S. black music in the Motown style. Probably just as well he called it ‘Northern’ as Northerners’ is right ‘ard t’get tongue ‘round ain’t it. The term Southern Soul is associated with the sounds of U.S. states in the south such as Louisiana, Tennessee etc - there is no name attached to what Londoners and southerners were listening to in 70’s or was there?

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44 minutes ago, FRANKIE CROCKER said:

So, is there such a thing as Southern Soul? What were Londoners listening to in the early 70’s? Dave Godin really could have coined the term Northerners’ Soul as it was reputedly lads from north of London asking after U.S. black music in the Motown style. Probably just as well he called it ‘Northern’ as Northerners’ is right ‘ard t’get tongue ‘round ain’t it. The term Southern Soul is associated with the sounds of U.S. states in the south such as Louisiana, Tennessee etc - there is no name attached to what Londoners and southerners were listening to in 70’s or was there?

That is an interesting question.  I knew somebody who was a Catacombs regular, I'm not sure when they went but I think it must have been late 60s to early 70s, who had a really nice small record collection.  He would tend to refer to the music from back then as "blues" rather than soul, my point being people have different names for the same thing or things that have a lot in common.

I remember going to youth clubs when I was a kid and people would bring records in to play and what was universally popular was Tamla and what we would now call "club soul".  I think we probably would have called this "disco" music?  I seem to remember back then that "disco" or "discotheque" just meant a place to play music with an uptempo dance beat (and the slow records at the end of the night for copping off purposes of course)?

There's a couple of recordings of a London soul pirate radio station from 1972 here:  

https://www.mixcloud.com/discover/radio-invicta/

Edited by woolie mark

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8 hours ago, FRANKIE CROCKER said:

So, is there such a thing as Southern Soul? What were Londoners listening to in the early 70’s? Dave Godin really could have coined the term Northerners’ Soul as it was reputedly lads from north of London asking after U.S. black music in the Motown style. Probably just as well he called it ‘Northern’ as Northerners’ is right ‘ard t’get tongue ‘round ain’t it. The term Southern Soul is associated with the sounds of U.S. states in the south such as Louisiana, Tennessee etc - there is no name attached to what Londoners and southerners were listening to in 70’s or was there?

Yes, but I don't think it's given a capital "S" which denotes a strict genre or  name (noun). As opposed to   "southern soul" (where southern is  an adjective). Likewise you'll hear the term "northen soul" used Stateside to describe Detroit/Chicago 60s soul as opposed to Memphis, Muscle Shoals etc. Genrally it's far a more relaxed adjective rather than a noun.

Anyway that's all I remeber form English "O" level. I've probably got it all wrong anyway.

As to the orignis of the tem NS  I really don't know but I would imagine the record companies marketing depts, in the early 70s would have played a major  part.

Edited by maslar

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19 minutes ago, maslar said:

The UK "Northern Soul" scene became one that place Gary Lewis and the Playboys over James Brown. A simple fact which says so much.

That's most certainly one way of looking at it. And putting it like that, pretty hard to argue against. However, remember, many of us on "the scene' back then would argue that Northern Soul (or whatever you want to call it), had actually been killed off by the time Gary Lewis was being played, and replaced with something else entirely. 

Prior to all that, we just knew it as "the scene' and listened to soul music. If my memory isn't fading too much, I can only remember a year or two before Wigan when we knew it as "Northern Soul".  And even then, when speaking with other people, we would almost always describe it as sixties soul, not northern.

And this was well before Pye and the rest of the music industry machine even noticed what was happening in certain clubs north of Watford.

Edited by Joey

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36 minutes ago, Joey said:

That's most certainly one way of looking at it. And putting it like that, pretty hard to argue against. However, remember, many of us on "the scene' back then would argue that Northern Soul (or whatever you want to call it), had actually been killed off by the time Gary Lewis was being played, and replaced with something else entirely. 

Prior to all that, we just knew it as "the scene' and listened to soul music. If my memory isn't fading too much, I can only remember a year or two before Wigan when we knew it as "Northern Soul".  And even then, when speaking with other people, we would almost always describe it as sixties soul, not northern.

And this was well before Pye and the rest of the music industry machine even noticed what was happening in certain clubs north of Watford.

And to throw this into the mix, bad as Gary Lewis etc was, were they as much out of place at a supposedly Soul club as the horrendous Dean Barlow in particular and Gene Stridel etc are today?

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5 minutes ago, soulatthedale said:

And to throw this into the mix, bad as Gary Lewis etc was, were they as much out of place at a supposedly Soul club as the horrendous Dean Barlow in particular and Gene Stridel etc are today?

The example I  gave is perhaps an extreme one (though true). But how about Franki Valli over Otis Redding? 

 

Edited by maslar

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23 minutes ago, maslar said:

The example I  gave is perhaps an extreme one (though true). But how about Franki Valli over Otis Redding? 

 

You have a point! There must be at least 8 F.Valli / 4 Seasons tunes that have had plays on the NS scene. Can you name 8 from Otis? It must be the pop/Motown sound is (was?) more at home on the scene than the 'grits n' chiltlins' southern sound.

EDIT: I suppose it's all about the danceability of a tune rather than where it's actual origins lie? 

Edited by Soul-Slider

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1 hour ago, maslar said:

The UK "Northern Soul" scene became one that place Gary Lewis and the Playboys over James Brown. A simple fact which says so much.

Easy to pick on that, but in reality the scene has ALWAYS played white mod/pop records. Big sounds at the Wheel (then Torch and Mecca) featured many "non soul" records. Julian Covey, Guy Darrell, Gary Puckett and the Union Gap, Spencer Davis, Barbara Mills, Wayne Gibson, etc etc etc etc. way before the Casino was open.

My understanding is Dave Godin was referring to records that sold to customers in the north as the demand for sixties dance tunes was high. In the early days, few if any new releases from the USA got played, and most UK spins were long since deleted.

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1 minute ago, jim g said:

Easy to pick on that, but in reality the scene has ALWAYS played white mod/pop records. Big sounds at the Wheel (then Torch and Mecca) featured many "non soul" records. Julian Covey, Guy Darrell, Gary Puckett and the Union Gap, Spencer Davis, Barbara Mills, Wayne Gibson, etc etc etc etc. way before the Casino was open.

My understanding is Dave Godin was referring to records that sold to customers in the north as the demand for sixties dance tunes was high. In the early days, few if any new releases from the USA got played, and most UK spins were long since deleted.

But didn't the Wheel era scene (and before) also play Black artists that were later largely ignored in the Wigan era? James brown , Otis R, Aretha Franklin (considering her output) plus many. many more?

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12 minutes ago, maslar said:

But didn't the Wheel era scene (and before) also play Black artists that were later largely ignored in the Wigan era? James brown , Otis R, Aretha Franklin (considering her output) plus many. many more?

Yep it did, but my point was to illustrate it is churlish to pick on one record or venue and lambast it for playing non "soul" records. Indeed, at least 20% all records I have tracked over the last 46 years are by non soul artists. Sone were awful IMHO, but that is just opinion.

Back to the topic, if NS had not become an icon name,  maybe it wouldn't be so popular in the mainstream, as they do like their labels for music.. and to try and described the "scene" or "movement" without a label might have tricky!

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Just now, jim g said:

Yep it did, but my point was to illustrate it is churlish to pick on one record or venue and lambast it for playing non "soul" records. Indeed, at least 20% all records I have tracked over the last 46 years are by non soul artists. Sone were awful IMHO, but that is just opinion.

Back to the topic, if NS had not become an icon name,  maybe it wouldn't be so popular in the mainstream, as they do like their labels for music.. and to try and described the "scene" or "movement" without a label might have tricky!

I'm actually ON TOPIC - that's what I'm talking about. How the adoption of a tag lead the scene in a  particular direction. I'm not talking about paticular records or venues.

"Churlish - adjective, rude, unfriendly, unpleasant".  

Snowflake - a lovely light little white flake of snow that falls from the sky and quickly melts in your little warm handy pandy.

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On 16/04/2018 at 14:39, RICK SCOTT said:

Well there is a Question to ponder With, seeing as how people like to "Pigeon Hole" Music and everything else under the sun, but it is worth asking, as it could have changed the whole Soul Scene as we know it Today If the term Northern Soul Had NOT been Coined. So, Seconds Away, Round One :wicked:

OK, lots of opinions, and answers to the original question. All of them interesting, as well as being valid. But, there's only one simple answer to the question. And that answer is "nothing". 

The "scene" was already well established, well known, and thriving before the term Northern Soul was coined. We just knew it as "the scene", and we were into "soul" music. it merely followed on from everything we were listening and dancing to in the youth clubs. In the early 70's, in northern England at least, even mainstream ballrooms played a healthy dose of classic soul and Motown tunes every night, instead of Alvin Stardust, Mudd, T.Rex, Bowie etc.  In the underground clubs we were attending instead, they just took the music another few steps further. Maybe I haven't put these thoughts across in the best possible or most lucid manner, but I'm sure you get my drift.

If the term northern soul had never been uttered, I'm sure that another one would maybe have been invented, to distinguish the soul scene in the North from the one in the South. But change the actual scene itself? No. No way. Not until certain people did in 75 anyway. And as they say, that's a whole 'nuther story!

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On 4/18/2018 at 10:09, Dayo said:

Years ago I had a trawl through my old copies of Blues & Soul to try and find when the term started to be used.  In all honesty I can't recall the result, but it's probably much later than most people think.  In 72 there were tons of references to the North, usually in John Abbey's snidey record reviews; "Here's yet another forgettable record that's sure to find favour in Northern discos" etc.  There was the Northern Soul Club, of course - but I think that was a little later (forget who was behind that now).

This was from early 70's. I went to The Raven at Whitchurch to see Soul Sam and this was run by Tony Petherbridge. Don't think he is with us anymore.

Never really liked the Northern soul tag.

scan0035.jpg

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9 minutes ago, stateside said:

This was from early 70's. I went to The Raven at Whitchurch to see Soul Sam and this was run by Tony Petherbridge. Don't think he is with us anymore.

Never really liked the Northern soul tag.

scan0035.jpg

Hi Kevin, my lass and I used to go to the Raven regular, albeit later on. My lass knew Tony Peth very well. Sadly you are correct and Tony is no longer with us.

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On 4/17/2018 at 23:17, WoodButcher said:

Sorry to rain on your parade but that poster is advertising a gig in Aylesbury , Bucks ... i.e. down South ,  by a band from Oldham ... i.e Oop North , a band who predominantly perfomed cover versions of soul tunes , only natural for them to be billed as a "Northern Soul and Action Group".

Had the typesetter not given the word 'northern' a capital letter it would be be easier read as intended , in other words "a top Soul and Action Group from the north"  ... :thumbsup:

That's how I read it

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On 16/04/2018 at 22:21, grantdyche said:

Soul music that people from the North bought more often,Than the funky stuff they bought down south,Northern Soul,Who gives a sh*te really,You either like it or you don't,It was Northern Soul and it is Northern Soul !

 

Absolutely bang on !

Regards Fred 

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A few comments in this thread about some artists not being soul artists. One example would be the record :- Charlie Rich:- Love is after me, a country singer yet it was a big sound at the Wheel and is definitely Northern Soul. It just shows that Northern soul  covers a very large spectrum of artists and music.

All the best Fred. 

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8 hours ago, Mr Fred said:

A few comments in this thread about some artists not being soul artists. One example would be the record :- Charlie Rich:- Love is after me, a country singer yet it was a big sound at the Wheel and is definitely Northern Soul. It just shows that Northern soul  covers a very large spectrum of artists and music.

All the best Fred. 

Barbara Mills - Queen of Fools, another example of a country song by a country singer, probably bigger on the Northern Soul scene than Charlie Rich.

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29 minutes ago, Steve S 60 said:

Barbara Mills - Queen of Fools, another example of a country song by a country singer, probably bigger on the Northern Soul scene than Charlie Rich.

Billy Joe Royal - Hearts Desire. Another pop/country artist with what was an absolute Monster on the scene back in the very early seventies. I once heard an American business associate of mine describe Country music as the Soul music of white folks. Thoughts?

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22 hours ago, maslar said:

The example I  gave is perhaps an extreme one (though true). But how about Franki Valli over Otis Redding? 

 

Well another example is they used to play Eddie Parker “I’m Gone” in Wigan Casino or Don Varner “Tearstained Face”  or “I Really Love You” The Tomangoes or “If This Is Love” The Precisions etc and they are better than anything Otis Redding ever did or James Brown!

Northern Soul is based on Dance Floor reaction, it’s NOT a deep soul scene!!!

Edited by solidsoul

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3 minutes ago, Joey said:

Billy Joe Royal - Hearts Desire. Another pop/country artist with what was an absolute Monster on the scene back in the very early seventies. I once heard an American business associate of mine describe Country music as the Soul music of white folks. Thoughts?

I've heard/read it described as "white man's blues" (maybe Kris Kristofferson).

Singer songwriter Donnie Fritts describes what he does as soul music. He's written for Charlie Rich and worked with Tony Joe White, another singer-songwriter who would be difficult to classify as "just" c&w. Bobby Womack did an album of country, and occasional country tracks appear on his other LPs: "I honestly love you" on "Roads of Life", and "Just my imagination" on "The Poet".

image.jpeg.6fc42af42a93b89f61db9a313718ad13.jpeg

This collection was a UK release in 1994. It covers all his Hi Records material, including previously unreleased tracks. Might be worth a reissue - came out through Demon Records.

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23 minutes ago, solidsoul said:

Well another example is they used to play Eddie Parker “I’m Gone” in Wigan Casino or Don Varner “Tearstained Face” and they are better than anything Otis Redding ever did or James Brown!

Northern Soul is based on Dance Floor reaction, it’s not a deep soul scene!!!

Quite. Its ALWAYS been a dance scene rather than a purely soul scene. A distinction lost on many.

Plus, (and I admit I stand a chance of being accused of sacrilege here), am I alone in thinking that both Otis and JB are not nearly as good as public and professional opinion would have us believe? Both good artists, but I can think of so many who were light years ahead of them.

Edited by Joey

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7 minutes ago, Joey said:

Quite. Its ALWAYS been a dance scene rather than a purely soul scene. A distinction lost on many.

And neither of these artists never made a record you could dance to? :g:

One thing about the Northern scene that stuck me back in the day was the strange selectivity that went on. A jazz-funk record like On Broadway by George Benson would be played - but not other similar jazz funk records. Likewise with Curtis Mayfield's Move On Up.  Artist such as james Brown, Redding, Franklin, et al were largely ignored  yet all produced dance music.

And I'm not even going to comment on the  assertion by Solidsoul that Otis Redding never made a record as good as Tear Stained Face. It's a Friday, the sun's shining and I'm trying hard not to be rude. :) I mean. what the actual f***? :D

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28 minutes ago, Mickey Finn said:

I've heard/read it described as "white man's blues" (maybe Kris Kristofferson).

Singer songwriter Donnie Fritts describes what he does as soul music. He's written for Charlie Rich and worked with Tony Joe White, another singer-songwriter who would be difficult to classify as "just" c&w. Bobby Womack did an album of country, and occasional country tracks appear on his other LPs: "I honestly love you" on "Roads of Life", and "Just my imagination" on "The Poet".

image.jpeg.6fc42af42a93b89f61db9a313718ad13.jpeg

This collection was a UK release in 1994. It covers all his Hi Records material, including previously unreleased tracks. Might be worth a reissue - came out through Demon Records.

I first saw the phase "country is the white man's blues" in The Story of Pop magazine I used to buy in the early 70s. I'm pretty sure it was attributed to a blues artist but I can't remember which one. But the country music they were referring to is what I'd call real country music, not just any  old country and western or county pop.

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3 minutes ago, maslar said:

And neither of these artists never made a record you could dance to? :g:

One thing about the Northern scene that stuck me back in the day was the strange selectivity that went on. A jazz-funk record like On Broadway by George Benson would be played - but not other similar jazz funk records. Likewise with Curtis Mayfield's Move On Up.  Artist such as james Brown, Redding, Franklin, et al were largely ignored  yet all produced dance music.

And I'm not even going to comment on the  assertion by Solidsoul that Otis Redding never made a record as good as Tear Stained Face. It's a Friday, the sun's shining and I'm trying hard not to be rude. :) I mean. what the actual f***? :D

Of course they made records that could be danced to. My post alluded to the fact that, (for me), they were seen as far better than they actually were. JB had a prodigious output, but can it be compared to Curtis Mayfields? Not for me I'm afraid. Same with Otis. A great singer, but again, for me, not even the best male artist at Stax, never mind the entire soul universe. Oh, and both those artists DID get plays at clubs in the early days. 

As for Tear Stained Face, I have to agree wholeheartedly. Again, and as many who know me and have seen my posts on this forum previously will know, that record was broken at a time when I personally believed the Northern scene was replaced by something else entirely. It, and so many others, just don't stand up to what was played before. Sorry, personal opinion and all that!

(George Benson, "On Broadway"? At a Northern event? Really? Same goes for Move on Up. Played exclusively at "normal" ballrooms/Discos back when it was a chart tune in or around 74. For me, most definitely NOT Northern, and I've argued that case before on this forum). 

Sun's not shining here in the bloody frozen North. Its still Friday though, (albeit a Friday in the 17th century in some parts of Bonnie Scotland), and I'm NEVER rude! (OK, occasionally perhaps :-).

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12 minutes ago, maslar said:

I first saw the phase "country is the white man's blues" in The Story of Pop magazine I used to buy in the early 70s. I'm pretty sure it was attributed to a blues artist but I can't remember which one. But the country music they were referring to is what I'd call real country music, not just any  old country and western or county pop.

"Real" country music is as far removed from C&W as Aretha is from Sinitta. Dolly Parton and Glen Campbell just cannot be compared to other, lesser known Country artists. My "business' associate once sent me, many years ago, a cassette tape full of true country music, all by artists I'd never even heard of and who's names I cannot begin to recall. Some of it was truly gut wrenching stuff, on a par with any soul record I've heard.

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1 hour ago, Joey said:

Of course they made records that could be danced to. My post alluded to the fact that, (for me), they were seen as far better than they actually were. JB had a prodigious output, but can it be compared to Curtis Mayfields? Not for me I'm afraid. Same with Otis. A great singer, but again, for me, not even the best male artist at Stax, never mind the entire soul universe. Oh, and both those artists DID get plays at clubs in the early days. 

As for Tear Stained Face, I have to agree wholeheartedly. Again, and as many who know me and have seen my posts on this forum previously will know, that record was broken at a time when I personally believed the Northern scene was replaced by something else entirely. It, and so many others, just don't stand up to what was played before. Sorry, personal opinion and all that!

(George Benson, "On Broadway"? At a Northern event? Really? Same goes for Move on Up. Played exclusively at "normal" ballrooms/Discos back when it was a chart tune in or around 74. For me, most definitely NOT Northern, and I've argued that case before on this forum). 

Sun's not shining here in the bloody frozen North. Its still Friday though, (albeit a Friday in the 17th century in some parts of Bonnie Scotland), and I'm NEVER rude! (OK, occasionally perhaps :-).

'Otis not the best artist on stax', blows your credibility for me, he is the king of soul IMHO, who on stax compares with that voice? that level of expression? 

Edited by geeselad

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46 minutes ago, geeselad said:

'Otis not the best artist on stax', blows your credibility for me, he is the king of soul IMHO, who on stax compares with that voice? that level of expression? 

As I said , all down to personal preference. Myself, I much preferred Eddie Floyd, Arthur Conley, and William Bell. I rather think that a preference for those three, although arguable by some such as yourself, does not "blow my credibility". 

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36 minutes ago, soash said:

,The main issue I have with the "Northern Soul" tag is simply that it is too wide, too all encompassing.

If I go to a "70's Disco Night" or a "Prog Rock Night" at my local DJ/pub night (not that I would) - I would know what I was gonna get.

"Northern Soul Night" would offer me no such guarantee.

A few years ago, I was happily spinning discs at just such a "Northern" night.

I remember, the last two records I had played were "There's Nothing Else To Say"/Incredibles" and "That's What I Want To Know"/James Carr - and a sweet girl came up to the desk and said "I thought you were playing Northern Soul tonight?"

As the Incredibles had just reminded me, there was nothing else to say......

She was in her 20's - I'm in my 60's - reliving my days at the Wheel.

Whatever she had heard, I don't know - but the stuff I was playing meant nothing to her. But I'm sure all my faves, and all hers, have all been tagged "Northern".

Sadly, we are stuck with it now.

In fact, IMHO, it is getting worse.

Many DJs, nowadays,  seem just to want to impress other DJs, rather than get the crowd dancing.

So what we hear are the rarest of the rare -  "look guys, see what I've got!". And it's a demo!" - and tagged on the poster as "Northern Soul".

Very sad, and very confusing. :huh:

Couldn't have put it better myself. No-one could.

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3 hours ago, soash said:

,The main issue I have with the "Northern Soul" tag is simply that it is too wide, too all encompassing.

If I go to a "70's Disco Night" or a "Prog Rock Night" at my local DJ/pub night (not that I would) - I would know what I was gonna get.

"Northern Soul Night" would offer me no such guarantee.

A few years ago, I was happily spinning discs at just such a "Northern" night.

I remember, the last two records I had played were "There's Nothing Else To Say"/Incredibles" and "That's What I Want To Know"/James Carr - and a sweet girl came up to the desk and said "I thought you were playing Northern Soul tonight?"

As the Incredibles had just reminded me, there was nothing else to say......

She was in her 20's - I'm in my 60's - reliving my days at the Wheel.

Whatever she had heard, I don't know - but the stuff I was playing meant nothing to her. But I'm sure all my faves, and all hers, have all been tagged "Northern".

Sadly, we are stuck with it now.

In fact, IMHO, it is getting worse.

Many DJs, nowadays,  seem just to want to impress other DJs, rather than get the crowd dancing.

So what we hear are the rarest of the rare -  "look guys, see what I've got!". And it's a demo!" - and tagged on the poster as "Northern Soul".

Very sad, and very confusing. :huh:

If the young lady didn’t know those Northern Soul records you were playing that’s her problem!  It’s up to experienced people to point them in the right direction!

She has got the pleasure of learning all those great records to come!

The term Northern Soul is split into segments by discribing the nights as Classics/oldies, 60’s Newies ), 70’s/modern, crossover, R&B so people can gauge what they are going to get. Also if a well know Dj,s are billed to play,that’s another way you will know what to expect.

Edited by solidsoul

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Quality Records Will or Should get a dance floor reaction based on my own experience, All these Big ticket Shit Rare records are just that, RARE, but can't compete with good quality soulful records with a Dance Beat  at more sensible prices, It Should always be about quality Not Rarity, After all, we all know You Can't Polish a Turd :D

Edited by RICK SCOTT

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4 minutes ago, RICK SCOTT said:

Quality Records Will or Should get a dance floor reaction based on my own experience, All these Big ticket Shit Rare records are just that, RARE, but can't compete with good quality soulful records with a Dance Beat  at more sensible prices, It Should always be about quality Not Rarity, After all, we all know You Can't Polish a Turd :D

And that everybody, is the definitive answer to a conundrum forced on us all since the early 70's !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :-)

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4 minutes ago, RICK SCOTT said:

Quality Records Will or Should get a dance floor reaction based on my own experience, All these Big ticket Shit Rare records are just that, RARE, but can't compete with good quality soulful records with a Dance Beat  at more sensible prices, It Should always be about quality Not Rarity, After all, we all know You Can't Polish a Turd :D

It's quality that counts for the older, more discerning soul fan, whether rare as rocking horse sh*t or more better known.  Actually you can polish a turd, but that's another story.

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Just now, Steve S 60 said:

It's quality that counts for the older, more discerning soul fan, whether rare as rocking horse sh*t or more better known.  Actually you can polish a turd, but that's another story.

Or, you can play "Freckles" with it.

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5 minutes ago, Steve S 60 said:

Come on Joey, it's a family website.

Almost half a century on, and whenever I think of that "game" I still don't know whether to laugh like a hyena or vomit uncontrollably 😂😂😂😂🤢🤢🤢🤢

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I have never heard of this "GAME" so Googled it, WOW, Certainly not for the "FAINT HEARTED" and so many Variations. Shows how inventive the Human race really are, Puts APES at the back of the Que when it comes to Entertainment :wicked: :g::rofl:

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5 minutes ago, RICK SCOTT said:

I have never heard of this "GAME" so Googled it, WOW, Certainly not for the "FAINT HEARTED" and so many Variations. Shows how inventive the Human race really are, Puts APES at the back of the Que when it comes to Entertainment :wicked: :g::rofl:

😂😂😂😂 probably puts a few humans further back on the evolutionary chain than some apes!

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I have the Harlem Johns lp.....the cover versions are uptempo and are not the usual stax Motown covers . They played  at the pre allnighter soul nights at Wigan Casino regularly and are pictured onstage there next to the piano so I know where my money is going.I am sure the north got checked out on a Tamla lp the one with the tracks that  segue into each other.Here is a letter from Randy Cozens looking back at the london pre northern scene.I do have an article about Gary Wilding somewhere about a venue in Blackpool which is not The Mecca and the fact that people there are paying above the odds for old soul records,It is from 68. 

randy cozens 1.jpg

randy cozens 2.jpg

randy cozens 3.jpg

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10 hours ago, wiggyflat said:

I have the Harlem Johns lp.....the cover versions are uptempo and are not the usual stax Motown covers . They played  at the pre allnighter soul nights at Wigan Casino regularly and are pictured onstage there next to the piano so I know where my money is going.I am sure the north got checked out on a Tamla lp the one with the tracks that  segue into each other.Here is a letter from Randy Cozens looking back at the london pre northern scene.I do have an article about Gary Wilding somewhere about a venue in Blackpool which is not The Mecca and the fact that people there are paying above the odds for old soul records,It is from 68. 

randy cozens 1.jpg

randy cozens 2.jpg

randy cozens 3.jpg

That LP would've been "16 non stop Tamla hits" issued over here in 72. Good album, very popular at the time. 

That club in Blackpool may well have been the Blackpool Wheel.

Edited by Joey

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On ‎20‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 12:43, solidsoul said:

 

The term Northern Soul is split into segments by discribing the nights as Classics/oldies, 60’s Newies ), 70’s/modern, crossover, R&B so people can gauge what they are going to get. Also if a well know Dj,s are billed to play,that’s another way you will know what to expect.

That is the very point I was making.

"Northern Soul" can mean any of those sub-genres you mention.

So, if you know the scene, and therefore know what to look for and what to ask, you are cool.

And if you really know your stuff, you just look at the DJ name, and you'll know what stuff he's gonna play.

But what if you are a newcomer to the scene? What if all those names mean nothing to you?

What if you've never heard of the DJ's name on the poster? You would be completely lost.

THAT is my point. 

Going to a new "northern" night, or going to an established night as a newcomer, it is a gamble.

Is it gonna be classic, is it gonna be modern, is it gonna by any of the categories you mention?

Lap of the gods, mate, - and confusion reigns.:(

 

Edited by soash

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10 hours ago, Joey said:

That LP would've been "16 non stop Tamla hits" issued over here in 72. Good album, very popular at the time. 

5adc544e2faf0_tracklist16nsth.jpg.8bf45e5cf675fba97150935939c2ead6.jpg

 

11 hours ago, wiggyflat said:

I am sure the north got checked out on a Tamla lp the one with the tracks that  segue into each other.

 

16 non-stop tamla hits.jpg

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