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Timillustrator

US 60's Garage bands

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I've always been a big fan of US 60's Garage bands; I find it interesting that certain records of this genre crossed over to the Northern Soul scene. It's always seemed a bit random to me though i.e. Stop Girl sounds (to me) pretty much like stuff by, say, ? Mark and the Mysterians, the Music Machine, Liberty Belle or the Standells which never crossed over. Mitch Ryder, The Human Beinz and, more on the pop end of the spectrum, Spiral Starecase, Fathers Angels and The Present are also popular (maybe it's pushing it to say they're "garage" though), anyone got any others??

 

Edited by Timillustrator
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It is an interesting point. Never a fan of this sort of stuff, it has nothing to do with soul music. Its just a frenetic beat that was lapped up by the 95% of the all niter scene back then who were off their heads on amphetamines - they'd dance to anything. Orroible stuff - the records not the drug, and probably in good company with other rubbish which was played such as this

 

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12 minutes ago, Peter99 said:

It is an interesting point. Never a fan of this sort of stuff, it has nothing to do with soul music. Its just a frenetic beat that was lapped up by the 95% of the all niter scene back then who were off their heads on amphetamines - they'd dance to anything. Orroible stuff - the records not the drug, and probably in good company with other rubbish which was played such as this

 

It's certainly about the beat, I just wonder why it was only certain records? Nearly all of them sound really white. You could quite easily put together a playlist of 1,000's of obscure garage rarities all with the same stomping beat, organ and more or less fuzz guitar, a damn sight cheaper than rare soul too, no one much collected this stuff until recently. Perhaps DJ's thought they could only get away with slipping the odd one in here or there?

Edited by Timillustrator

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1 minute ago, Timillustrator said:

It's certainly about the beat, I just wonder why it was only certain records? Nearly all of them sound really white. You could quite easily put together a playlist of 1,000's of obscure garage rarities all with the same stomping beat, organ and more or less fuzz guitar, a damn sight cheaper than rare soul too, no one much collected this stuff until recently; Perhaps DJ's thought they could only get away with slipping the odd one in here or there. 

Keb darge did 

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3 minutes ago, Timillustrator said:

It's certainly about the beat, I just wonder why it was only certain records? Nearly all of them sound really white. You could quite easily put together a playlist of 1,000's of obscure garage rarities all with the same stomping beat, organ and more or less fuzz guitar, a damn sight cheaper than rare soul too, no one much collected this stuff until recently. Perhaps DJ's thought they could only get away with slipping the odd one in here or there?

I guess only some of them were known by the "northern" soul scene at the time. Perhaps random things that dj's became aware of. I'm not aware of anyone talking about the US garage scene back in the day.  

:hatsoff2:

Just now, Spain pete said:

Keb darge did 

Not many people would argue with Keb.

 

LOL

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Peter99 said:

I guess only some of them were known by the "northern" soul scene at the time. Perhaps random things that dj's became aware of. I'm not aware of anyone talking about the US garage scene back in the day.  

:hatsoff2:

Not many people would argue with Keb.

 

LOL

 

 

And live to tell the tale 

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That could be the link, there was a lot of this 60's Garage stuff being played in the psych scene in the mid to late 80's in a couple of small clubs around London (and Birmingham (to a lesser extent)). 

Edited by Timillustrator

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1 hour ago, Karl s said:

The patrick bradley , one more chance , instrumental version massive stomper 

(selling a copy in sales ) sorry😳😳

Interesting, I've heard that before but it hadn't occurred to me that it was particularly garage-y but listening to it there's certainly the farfisa sounding organ and fuzz guitar in there.  A bit of Googling turns up that it was written by Jeff Christie the Yorkshireman who had a massive hit with Yellow River in 1971. Although the Patrick Bradley were an east cost US band.

 

Edited by Timillustrator

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5 hours ago, malik said:

Just wondering  : were the Camel Drivers a garage band ? 

 

It's the right era (late 60's) and place (Michigan), this is maybe a little more polished than most with the brass section but the jangly guitar and snotty sounding vocal at the start certainly fit the bill. Great song.

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There must be hundreds that have been picked up by the scene.  Probably hundreds out of the Carolinas alone.  "Garage" as a genre is very diverse so I guess, in the context of this thread, everyone will have different boundarys so the list is endless.

A few I'd throw into the mix:

The Nomads - Somethin's Bad, The Lucky Charms - Tied To Your Heart, The "Q" - That's The Way, The Soul Four - Misery, The Avengers - No Wonder, Eruptions - Price Of Love & a couple of personal faves Soul For Sale - Dance Children Dance / Let Me Love You & The Accidentals - These Days

 

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In my opinion most of the tunes posted here can't be classified as Garage (with a touch of soul). I'd put them into the Carolina Beach/Soul bag. I'm saying they are not good! Just not Garage-ish enough for me.

Only proper Garage tunes posted that suitable for the Northern Soul scene (IMO) is Strangeloves and to a certain extent Dry Well (which I think is pretty psychedelic and of course a cover version)

 

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Twelve 76 , the way you make me feel , critique records , listen to this stafford killer covered up by guy as lionel richie its freakbeat but it kinda fits the gendre   

Edited by Karl s
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Sousson did an instrumental version of the electric prunes too much to dream last night called serenade by sounds of lane on soul galore , not gonna comment on it but the electric prunes original is brilliant 

 

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8 hours ago, Benji said:

In my opinion most of the tunes posted here can't be classified as Garage (with a touch of soul). I'd put them into the Carolina Beach/Soul bag. I'm saying they are not good! Just not Garage-ish enough for me.

Only proper Garage tunes posted that suitable for the Northern Soul scene (IMO) is Strangeloves and to a certain extent Dry Well (which I think is pretty psychedelic and of course a cover version)

 

It depends on your definition and could be as tricky as defining what Northern Soul is. For me, it's US bands active between '63 and '66 with a five man line up (usually) consisting of guitars (fuzzy and/or jangly), bass, drums, keyboard (commonly Farfisa or Vox), after '67 most started to go psychedelic or some got smoother and added to their line up. 

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11 minutes ago, Timillustrator said:

According to an interview with Keb Darge, these two were garage singles played at Wigan; the first is pretty raw stuff, not beach music certainly:

 

 

 

Was this really played at Wigan? This is one of the tunes that Keb plays nowadays....

2 minutes ago, DaveNPete said:

I would've thought club sounds like the Castaways' 'Liar Liar' and ? & The Mysterions 'Eighteen' would've been top of this posting list.
Dx

Didn't know both were played on the Northern Scene? They sure are Garage records.

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Liar Liar has been played on and off since the 60s. Richard Anthony's 'No Good' and The Outsiders 'Backwards Upside Down' are pretty garage too. Jimmy Hanna's version of 'Leavin Here' is one I used to love too.
Dx

Edited by DaveNPete

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There are 2 vinyl L.P's out now called 'It's Boss! Man!' featuring 'USA 1960's Soulin' Garage' that's what it states on the cover. I have volume one and I would say that at least half of these could be played on the 'Northern' scene....

 boss1.jpg.57e928c24b0ea61ec3571d322ac4fb0b.jpg

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15 hours ago, Karl s said:

Sousson did an instrumental version of the electric prunes too much to dream last night called serenade by sounds of lane on soul galore , not gonna comment on it but the electric prunes original is brilliant 

 

Blimey that's pretty dire! Agree the original is a garage/psych classic, much covered by many punk bands too (and others), the first I heard was Wayne County and the Electric Chairs from 1978.

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2 hours ago, DaveNPete said:

I would've thought things like the Castaways' 'Liar Liar' and ? & The Mysterions 'Eighteen' would've been top of this posting list.
Dx

The ? & The Mysterians one is a proper stomper alright! and I am a big fan of theirs, didn't know this was ever played out, was 96 Tears ever played anywhere? I find that really soulful in an odd kind of way, I think Wilson Picket did a version (along with a lot of other people). 

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