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Timillustrator

US 60's Garage bands

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I did go to a hell of a lot of ns nighters and clubs between 1980 and 1988 i stopped ns nighters in  88 after a mad night at shoom (changed everything for me in  late 87 ,) so count 5 was played around clubs a lot before then also a lot of medicine was consumed ,count five may have been at a ns / scooterist periferal night but saying that it was played a fcuking lot at a lot of places its a stonker of a garage tune

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The Underdogs Love's Gone Bad. Also various Sunliners stuff.  I think Detroit gives a good microcosm.

Out of interest: Imagine you'd never head Stewart Ames' "Angelina" before. How would you describe it on first hearing? 

Edited by maslar

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2 hours ago, Karl s said:

I did go to a hell of a lot of ns nighters and clubs between 1980 and 1988 i stopped ns nighters in  88 after a mad night at shoom (changed everything for me in  late 87 ,) so count 5 was played around clubs a lot before then also a lot of medicine was consumed ,count five may have been at a ns / scooterist periferal night but saying that it was played a fcuking lot at a lot of places its a stonker of a garage tune

Wow, thanks. I used to hear the Count Five and the Seeds played in the 80's and 90's at psych/alternative/indie nights all the time; never would have associated either of them with the NS scene.

Fantastic slab of garage!

Edited by Timillustrator

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On 01/12/2018 at 19:49, Soul-Slider said:

Could get plays?

 

 

Wow love the baseline on that one! Pretty smooth vocals too, as with a lot of the others posted it's got the right beat and a slightly hybrid feel but the rinky dink organ and twangy guitar at the end really gives it away as a garage track.

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3 hours ago, Spain pete said:

Philly dog around the world 🎶🎶😱

Yes, but on the wrong speed! I thought for a minute you meant that the title translated to that in English as well😁. Google translate tells me it's "The Sun Is A Drug", I wonder what the rest of the words are?

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1 hour ago, BabyBoyAndMyLass said:

To me this one totally has that 'Garage band' feel about it. The musicianship is probably second-year level, the naïve sound and in particular the arrangement suggests to my ears a band that was only just starting out.

A lot of records on the scene make me think like this, one of the reasons I like it, reminds me of Punk a lot, 'we're gonna keep on playing like this until we can play something better!'

Having said that I really dig this one! 

 

Fantastic, I have that on a CD somewhere. Concur with your analysis it does sound like the musicians are all just starting out and can keep a riff going until a break but not much more. The backing vocals sound a bit more sophisticated though. Do you think this was the same band? The bass playing is certainly a lot more accomplished and there's an organ on it too. 

 

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2 minutes ago, the yank said:

"Descent" is out and out Garage, the flip side sounds

like it could have come from the Carolinas- 

 

Brill, I just love their publicity photograph too - they look uncannily like the Beach Boys with a Brian Wilson lookalike (bottom left) and Al Jardine (bottom right)!

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1 minute ago, Timillustrator said:

Fantastic, I have that on a CD somewhere. Concur with your analysis it does sound like the musicians are all just starting out and can keep a riff going until a break but not much more. The backing vocals sound a bit more sophisticated though. Do you think this was the same band? The bass playing is certainly a lot more accomplished and there's an organ on it too.

I can see similarities, if it is the same band they have either got a better bass player or he's been brushing up on his jazz lines...

The vocals on the other one, don't forget that a good voice is something you're born with, musicianship may take a little while...

Bloody singers, bring virtually nothing to the table, end up stuffed full of a five-course meal... Hope you're well Tim! :hatsoff2:

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10 minutes ago, BabyBoyAndMyLass said:

I can see similarities, if it is the same band they have either got a better bass player or he's been brushing up on his jazz lines...

The vocals on the other one, don't forget that a good voice is something you're born with, musicianship may take a little while...

Bloody singers, bring virtually nothing to the table, end up stuffed full of a five-course meal... Hope you're well Tim! :hatsoff2:

Very good thanks mate; hope you are? I used to sing, my mate, the guitarist, was a WAY better musician than me and actually everyone else in the band but never got any credit at all.

Going back to Thank You Baby, I can see what you mean about punk the bass playing could be Dee Dee Ramone - one note at 100mph!

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2 hours ago, Timillustrator said:

Yes, but on the wrong speed! I thought for a minute you meant that the title translated to that in English as well😁. Google translate tells me it's "The Sun Is A Drug", I wonder what the rest of the words are?

Some of the locals go mad for Jimmie's 

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Going a tad off piste here but as pointed out by Dis57 (Can I get A Witness) and Spain Pete (Philly Dog Around The World), most garage groups simply re-wrote (stole?) stuff and took the credit, not that they probably made a penny off it at the time though. The first time I heard this 30 odd years ago I instantly thought it was Barefootin' -  it's certainly got a lot of similarities, but I bet Robert Parker never got anything. That first Grateful Dead album sounded pretty garag-ey to me too mostly R&B rewrites with a bit of wordplay thrown in (forgive me for posting the GD here, I'm not  a fan of their other stuff much😓). 

 

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Bit of an oddity this one, obviously a cover of the Spencer Davis song but North American band, somehow sounds both more garagey (probably the start without the well known drum and bass bit, which SDG stole off Homer Banks anyway!) and slightly more soulful? 

 

 

Edited by Timillustrator

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Heard this played the other day, apparently played at the Twisted Wheel. It's another of the "mainstream" garage songs like the Castaways, Seeds, ? Mark and The Mysterions which although never chart hits were well known in many other scenes as well, I wonder if there were any more? I was amazed that Pushin' Too Hard was played because it sounds so un-soul like. Always loved this.

 

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On 23/11/2018 at 22:34, tiberius said:

I think Rare Bread has had plays.

 

Hi Tiberius

I used to play Steam,s version of this, its the b side of Na Na Na hey hey goodbye circa late 69 / 70 it’s a little bit more soulful, if you’ve not heard it give it a try

Mick L

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6 hours ago, Timillustrator said:

Heard this played the other day, apparently played at the Twisted Wheel. It's another of the "mainstream" garage songs like the Castaways, Seeds, ? Mark and The Mysterions which although never chart hits were well known in many other scenes as well, I wonder if there were any more? I was amazed that Pushin' Too Hard was played because it sounds so un-soul like. Always loved this.

 

RE Sir Douglas Quintet. I remember having a tape cassette (still got it, in the loft) full of Northern Soul from Wigan era days and 'She's About A Mover' was on it. 

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Another one believe it or not 

Benzine village of tears 

obviously not a soul band persay or heavy garage a message non the less

but who would really sing about dropping napalm on a village 

benzine and detergent = napalm 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Karl s said:

but who would really sing about dropping napalm on a village 

benzine and detergent = napalm 

 

Not them a] Listen to the lyrics and b] napalm does not contain benzine, it's petroleum jelly. Personally I always loved the song but certainly wouldn't call it 'garage'.
Dx

Edited by DaveNPete

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96 tears the Mysterions was a massive fairground record in 1967 it was played on Silcocks waltzer which I worked on all through that year along with Sir Douglas Quintet ( She’s about a mover the year before)  Gloria by the wheels and Them, got a load of plays.

MickL

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Amsterdam Russ said:

And another - unidentified girl group performing a garage/beat number called Ring around the Rosie on a Tower Sound Studios acetate (Broadway, New York). If you play the tune on this page, you won't be able to read my notes about the disc, which say...

 

 

The clip comes from my YouTube channel.

I really like that! 'The Shaggs' did a similar version on Palmer....

 

 

Edited by Soul-Slider

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Hi davenpete original napalm A contained benzine and polystyrene and orher good stuff as it burned and was sticky early vietnam war 

made your eyes water i think

 

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Used to have quite a few punk/garage US 45s but let most of them go for Northern swaps. I kept this 45 though

Remember Alex Jones and myself finding 20+ copies of Surrealistic Pillar 45 in a Cajun store somewhere in Louisiana.

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Whilst not exclusively about garage bands, my book “Its Better to Cry” attempted to discuss the phenomenon of Carolina / Va white bands specifically in the context of those ‘adopted’ by the northern soul scene, some mentioned here like the Chashers etc. The definition of the  garage band term  is fraught with the same potential for ambiguity as northern, beach music etc. and is probably most traditionally associated with late 60s psyche, though that wasnt the whole story. But then folk get too hung up on pigeon holing.  If I can dig out a word file on to give a flavour of the history in the southeast states through the 60s and how these guys embraced the soul phenomenon I’ll post up.

Edited by Windlesoul

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From the book: 
By the 1950s kids (black and white) were listening and dancing to national bands who played blues orientated race music and doo-wop. Artists  like The Clovers and Clyde McPhatter were popular. Arthur ‘Guitar Boogie’ Smith was a household name in the Carolinas. He was a talented country composer, guitar player, fiddler and radio presenter (and the original writer of the “Duelling Banjos” instrumental which was re-recorded and used on the 1972 film Deliverance). Arthur became successful after the Second World War with his Calling Carolina radio show and the Arthur Smith Show on the Charlotte NC WBTV channel. In the mid to late 1950s through his talent hunt search, he discovered doo-wop acts such as The Embers, Harry Deal & the Galaxies and Maurice Williams who would later go on to become big beach names of the sixties and beyond. Other TV shows also followed suit, particularly around NC, as a showcase for teenage music and dance talent. 
 
Motown, soul and R&B had arrived by the 1960s and could be heard all over the south east from radio stations with geographically wide broadcasting capabilities, both inland and along the coastal areas. These fresh sounds were an immediate hit with local high school and college students as well as vacationing teenagers and many local bands picked up on this.
 
Students played a major political role in the civil rights movement as discussed earlier, but also had a role in developing and supporting the 1960s beach music scene. Southern college and university fraternities by the 1960s had become social living communities notorious for drinking, sex and partying hard. The emerging sound of soul appealed to black and white students alike. Local bands, usually made up of high school or college students, were frequently hired to play at frat parties and high school proms and made their bread and butter in this way. It is not surprising then that many groups, including those discussed here, were a ‘live act’ or revue first and foremost, and vinyl recordings were sparse.
“We were all what you might call middle-class white - our neighbourhoods looked like Beaver Cleaver’s of the 1960s” says Nat Speir, founder member of Bob Meyer and the Rivieras. “But we were always very aware of the race issue and the sensitivity of our black acquaintances. We talked a good bit to Curtis and The Impressions about this when worked with them - but things were usually so rushed there was little time for that in most situations. Some of my friends’ parents became heroes to me by inviting four young black men from the Bedford-Stuyvesant project in New York to come and spend a summer with us in our homes, sponsored by an ecumenical group. They were singers too - fancying themselves as younger Little Anthony and the Imperials or The Manhattans. We gigged together for about four months and we all learned a great deal. Yes there were many tricky situations with these guys and with some of the national acts. But booking agents protected the groups somewhat. They wanted to make money. Also Charlotte was never like Mississippi. It was usually cool in Charlotte, or Greensboro, or Columbia - not everywhere was though in the early to mid 60s. The larger cities and towns were segregated in many ways of course. But the "the deal" with the south east was that there were many ways we did interact. Middle class whites wanted black music. Some find this hard to understand. Why would the Charlotte Country Club Deb Ball want Hank Ballard instead of The Beach Boys for their entertainment? But I was right there every chance I got. I heard and got to know many soul and R&B acts in those places. On my turf of course. I doubt I would have been welcome on their’s. And that's fair.”
 
 When further refining the term 'beach music' in the context of the 1960s, a reasonable approach may be to reserve beach music for local and national acts (black and white) that particularly had a whole or partial R&B / soul repertoire along the coastal areas of the Carolinas at the time, or were big hits on the beach then. But even this is an over-simplistic view. As Greg Haynes’ work demonstrates, a myriad of teenage garage bands existed well outside of the Carolinas, who were aware of the emerging appeal and accessibility of the ‘new’ black sound of R&B and soul to a white audience, particularly on the beach resorts. Some tapped into this, even though their own individual musical approach may previously have been more mainstream pop orientated. A few bands briefly explored soul, some stuck with it, and others started with the specific intention of providing this music. 
 
Many bands and vocal groups were actually based inland. With the exception of the Wilmington NC-based group The Generation, or Ron Moody’s outfit from Richmond VA, all the acts described in this book were from areas which lie anywhere between 150 to 500 miles from the coast. Key R&B radio stations broadcast throughout the whole of the south east, ensuring access for teenagers even in remote locations. Inland pools and lake pavilions with jukeboxes were dotted throughout the Carolinas, which offered a ‘substitute beach’ environment where teenagers could swim and listen to music. Take as an example the Williams Lake rural resort near Fayetteville NC, which was originally built during the Second World War and continued to be a popular venue throughout the 1960s. Bob Collins and the Fabulous Five played there in Easter ’65. Other bands included The Monzas, The Aqua Lads, Gene Barbour and the Cavaliers, Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs, and national acts like Jackie Wilson, Barbara Lewis, Eddie Floyd and Mary Wells. That said, many inland bands also regularly travelled hundreds of miles (despite the dangers outlined by Nat Speir earlier) to play gigs at the coastal resorts. Long running groups like The Embers, Harry Deal and the Galaxies and Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs travelled extensively to both coastal and inland venues. 

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12 hours ago, Windlesoul said:

Whilst not exclusively about garage bands, my book “Its Better to Cry” attempted to discuss the phenomenon of Carolina / Va white bands specifically in the context of those ‘adopted’ by the northern soul scene, some mentioned here like the Chashers etc. The definition of the  garage band term  is fraught with the same potential for ambiguity as northern, beach music etc. and is probably most traditionally associated with late 60s psyche, though that wasnt the whole story. But then folk get too hung up on pigeon holing.  If I can dig out a word file on to give a flavour of the history in the southeast states through the 60s and how these guys embraced the soul phenomenon I’ll post up.

Great book and on my shelf!

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3 hours ago, Windlesoul said:

When further refining the term 'beach music' in the context of the 1960s, a reasonable approach may be to reserve beach music for local and national acts (black and white) that particularly had a whole or partial R&B / soul repertoire along the coastal areas of the Carolinas at the time, or were big hits on the beach then.

Before his sad passing toward the end of last year I had a great chat online (one of many) with Nelson Lemond, drummer of The Tempests, I asked him what genre of music the band were aiming for when they recorded 'Someday'. Nelson said that the band always considered themselves as 'Carolina Beach' a genre of it's own around the south east coast at that time, fascinating stuff. A lovely gentleman was Nelson!

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