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Billy Freemantle

Favourite Major Lance

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I've probably left off some essential Major Lance, here. This is one way of finding out.

I'll cast my vote for "You don't want me no more".

link

That would get my vote too.

But I also really like "I just can't help it" - the flip of Everybody Loves a Good Time.

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I've gotta agree with Dayo. "Too Hot to Hold" is my favorite at the moment. It was tough for me to choose between "Investigate" and "You Don't Want Me No More", too. I'm also a big fan of "The Matador". I could go on...

Damn decisions...

KTF

Jas

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:yes: How about this one

Got to hold my hands up on this dont know what lable this is on or if its played out or not got it on a cd swap so any info would be apprechated

cheers

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:yes: How about this one

Got to hold my hands up on this dont know what lable this is on or if its played out or not got it on a cd swap so any info would be apprechated

cheers

link

I know he did some 70's stuff on Columbia, Volt and Osiris.... could be on one of those....

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:yes: How about this one

Got to hold my hands up on this dont know what lable this is on or if its played out or not got it on a cd swap so any info would be apprechated

cheers

link

Without listening it could be........

Soul 35123 I Never Thought I'd Be Losing You

Late 70's I think.

Edited by chalky

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Can I just choose all 40 tunes on the best of double CD that came out on Epic back in '95? :yes:

I've voted for "Come See" above for the simple reason that I was undecided between them all and chose a tune at random.

Gordy

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I've probably left off some essential Major Lance, here. This is one way of finding out.

I'll cast my vote for "You don't want me no more".

link

Gone for "dont want me no more" Ultimate Northern IMO! Mind missin from list is in my view is his most soulful.... an thats "I" flip ov "Aint No Soul" Love it!

steve

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My faves not there either." Youre everything i need" :P

link

Just buy Al Green's Greatest Hits :yes:

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:thumbsup: How about this one

Got to hold my hands up on this dont know what lable this is on or if its played out or not got it on a cd swap so any info would be apprechated

cheers

link

'I never thought' What a nice sound. Year?

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'I never thought' What a nice sound. Year?

link

I have it on an 1978 Soul album, maybe a California label by then but the credits have a big Chicago influence on this album, absolutely great track, forgot about this, sure there are a couple on this album, have just dug it out to play. Good Choice.

Also just dug out the Contempo Deep Soul lps, amazing LP;s, and he does a great ballad on one called Dark and Lonely very different for him but I love it. If interested can try and put a sound file up later (not done it before but will try).

Cheers

Jock

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Can't see Please Don't Say No More  :thumbsup:

link

Glad I did this thread. I might never have heard this great tune if I hadn't. Lovethe trumpet. Percussion is really rich, too. Any chance if hearing the whole song, Chalky?

Edited by Billy Freemantle

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I'm the one.

Was this UK only?

link

Yes, Yes , Yes , Derek, that's got to be the one for me too, I'm playing it right now, The Major never sounded better, Sweeter as the day's go by on Dakar, is also very good and shouldn't be over looked.

Excellent choice Derek....... :thumbsup:

JM

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:thumbsup: How about this one

Got to hold my hands up on this dont know what lable this is on or if its played out or not got it on a cd swap so any info would be apprechated

cheers

link

1978......... I'd Never thought i'd be losing you.....Motown

Edited by johnmay

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Yes, Yes , Yes , Derek, that's got to be the one for me too, I'm playing it right now,  The Major never sounded better,  Sweeter as the day's go by on Dakar, is also very good and shouldn't be over looked.

Excellent choice Derek....... :P

JM

link

Thanks John.

I'll reply to you on this thread but the answer "cross'sover" onto to others you have posted on.

Yes it's a great track. to me it's more significant than that.

When I first heard it (around '93) It was totally new to me and one of those records that made me think I have got to hear more "new" sounds and get away from the played out oldie local scene. I remember my copy of a copy etc. of "Chalky's choice". What a tape. Mark Bicknall's tapes also.

I didn't realise it then but Mark is really good at DJ'ing, all the records he plays if you don't know them, sound £1000 things, which I thought they were. Only after chasing down the details did I find that mixed in among the Cashmeres, Dusty Wilson . were things I could afford. Sammy Taylor, Anna King. etc.

Sorry to sound like Mark's stalker.

So! I'm sticking up for "I'm the one" '60s soul. Me, trying to support local venues in the early '90s that tried to move the scene on a bit. Chalky's right, very few people wanted to know.

One last bit.

No matter what part of the scene you prefer, dosen't everybody like to hear new things.??

Sorry for posting this on this thread, if anyone feels it shouldn't be here

Tough.

:thumbsup::shades::P

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Glad I did this thread. I might never have heard this great tune if I hadn't. Lovethe trumpet. Percussion is really rich, too. Any chance if hearing the whole song, Chalky?

link

Thought the whole song was there Billy so just downloaded it and I get the whole track. Let me know if your still having trouble and I'll send of list.

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1978......... I'd Never thought i'd be losing you.....Motown

link

Anybody got one to sell UK or USA , Demo or issue, Idont mind

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Thought the whole song was there Billy so just downloaded it and I get the whole track.  Let me know if your still having trouble and I'll send of list.

link

Managed to get if from KFT download. I wonder who the writers were on this one? Curtis Mayfield?

Research tells me its yet another Carl Davis (& Curtis Mayfield ) production and that it was the B side to Rhythm.

post-1904-1105236826_thumb.jpg

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Managed to get if from KFT download. I wonder who the writers were on this one? Curtis Mayfield?

Research tells me its yet another Carl Davis (& Curtis Mayfield ) production and that it was the B side to Rhythm.

link

Yes it's the flip to Rhythm :lol:

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I've also voted for "you don't want me no more", but I'd like to add that the flip side "wait till I get you in my arms" is pretty good, too.

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Yes, Yes , Yes , Derek, that's got to be the one for me too, I'm playing it right now,  The Major never sounded better,  Sweeter as the day's go by on Dakar, is also very good and shouldn't be over looked.

Excellent choice Derek....... whistling.gif

JM

link

John my fav Major track by a mile........ "Sweeter as the days go by"

though i still love "The Beat"

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Anybody got one to sell UK or USA , Demo or issue, Idont mind

link

whistling.gif You can get it on the Album "now arriving - major lance"on Soul S7-751R1 1978 I was told this was the last album to come out on SOUL, I maybe wrong only what I was told -- costs about 10- 15 quid..has another excellent track on "think about the love we had" I've played both these out and they went down really well.. :lol:

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" I NEVER THOUGHT I'D BE LOSING YOU"

Just got it out when I was doing this and played it... Better give it a spin at Plinston Friday..Forgot how good it was...Thanks Miff for mentioning it.. whistling.gif

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I've got to say that beside the obvious that have been mentioned above and I agree with all mentioned BTW but also I rate "Since I lost my baby's love" as far as I can recall it was a B side on two Volt issues, quite a catchy little tune!!

To me personally I put Major Lance at the Top of the Tree his reedy vocals are one of the most distinctive sounds in the soul world, I saw him twice and both times I came away feeling that I'd seen someone very special. If you listen to his early work and then follow it through to the 80s stuff he adapted to just about about every era, Quite a Unique and Brilliant Vocalist!!

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If you listen to his early work and then follow it through to the 80s stuff he adapted to just about about every era, Quite a Unique and Brilliant Vocalist!!

link

Very true. If you listen to the late seventies "I never thought" that someone posted we can see just how well he did handle the transition. It's such a loss that people like this leave us so soon.

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#1 - You don't want me no more

I play the b side just as much - Wait till I get you in my arms

Not many better double siders than that - wish I had my original back! Sold it for £10 years ago and bought the boot - 85p I think.

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One of the amazing things about Major Lance or that I find amazing anyway is the natural raw talent that came from around the Cabrini Green area where he grew up, his best friend Otis Leavil, childhood friends Curtis Mayfield and the Butler Brothers, jeeez theres a some line up right there. I think a lot of people forget that Major Lance was the biggest selling Okeh artist (along with Curtis Mayfields Impressions) and was the largest selling Chicago artist from 1963-66, now that in it's self is some feat!!

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Gee Shucks Dek of York, thanks for your kind comments, try to do the best i can when kindly asked to DJ out and about, hey guys and girls check out The Visitors - Never The Less on Tangerine OHHHHHHHHHH !

Me thinks 2005 is gonna be a very good year indeed on the soul scene....

Regards - Mark Bicknell.

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hey guys and girls check out The Visitors - Never The Less on Tangerine OHHHHHHHHHH !

Me thinks 2005 is gonna be a very good year indeed on the soul scene....

Regards - Mark Bicknell.

link

Good call Mark.... had this one a while.... seem to remember putting the other side on the Mid Tempo CD swap thingy....

An RA sound file of NTL.... LISTEN HERE....

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amazing anyway is the natural raw talent that came from around the Cabrini Green area where he grew up, his best friend Otis Leavil, childhood friends Curtis Mayfield and the Butler Brothers, jeeez theres a some line up right there.

Jimmy Burns said in an interview that he went to school with The Major. :D

Heikki 1

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Came across this biography of Major Lance.

Biography: Major Lance

Blessed with a warm, sweet voice, Major Lance was one of the leading figures of Chicago soul during the '60s and the top-selling artist for OKeh Records during the decade. Lance not only had a lovely voice, but his material was excellent. During the height of his success, the majority of his songs were written by Curtis Mayfield and produced by Carl Davis, and the pair developed a smooth, Latin-flavored sound that was punctuated by brass and layered with vocal harmonies, usually from the Impressions. It was urban, uptown soul and while it was considerably less gritty than its Southern counterpart, its breezy rhythms and joyous melodies made songs like "The Monkey Time" and "Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um" some of the most popular good-time R&B of its era. Major Lance's career declined significantly after he parted ways with Mayfield and Davis in the late '60s, but his classic OKeh recordings remain some of the best-loved soul music of the decade.

Born in Winterville, Mississippi, Major Lance moved to Chicago as a child, where he was initially raised on the west side of the city, before he moved near the north. While studying at Wells High School -- where Curtis Mayfield and Jerry Butler also attended -- Lance began boxing, but his attention soon turned to music and he formed the Floats with Otis Leavill. Although the Floats never released any records, his dancing earned him a spot on a local American Bandstand styled program hosted by disc jockey Jim Lounsbury. The DJ helped Lance secure a one-shot single for Mercury Records in 1959, and the singer recorded "I Got a Girl," which was written and produced by Mayfield. The single disappeared and Lance spent the next three years working odd jobs.

In 1962, Lance was signed to the revived OKeh Records, based on his connections with Otis Leavill and, especially, Curtis Mayfield, who signed with the Impressions to ABC Records and having hits with his own group. Later that year, Lance recorded his first single, "Delilah," for the label. Like most of the Major's material, the song was written by Mayfield who, along with OKeh president Carl Davis and arranger Johnny Pate, developed a distinctive, Latin-tinged sound for the record, filled with sliding trombones and a light-stepping rhythms in order to distinguish Chicago soul from its counterparts in the South, New York, Detroit and California. Though "Delilah" wasn't a hit, Lance's second single, "The Monkey Time," was a monster. Released in the summer of 1963, "The Monkey Time" reached number two on the R&B charts and number eight pop, establishing not only Lance as a singer but the revitalized OKeh Records as a pop music force. "Hey Little Girl" was a Top 15 pop and R&B hit later that year, followed by the Top 10 "Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um" early in 1964.

"The Monkey Time" and "Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um" proved to be the height of Lance's popularity. Over the next year and a half, he continued to turn out a series of Mayfield-written and Davis-produced singles, nearly all of which reached the R&B Top 40, but only a handful -- "The Matador" (which Mayfield didn't write), "Rhythm," "Come See"-- were pop hits. Following the summer 1965 release of the Top 20 R&B hit "Ain't It A Shame," Pate departed for ABC Records and Mayfield began concentrating on his group, but Lance and Davis continued to mine the same Chicago sound, using guitarist Gerald Sim as a songwriter and co-producer. After releasing a few singles, including the R&B hit "Too Hot to Hold" and the Van McCoy-written "Everybody Loves a Good Time," Davis left OKeh Records due to arguments with his superiors at Epic Records and Lance was sent to work with Billy Sherrill in Nashville. Out of these sessions, "It's the Beat" became Lance's only Top 40 hit. Since the teaming with Sherrill wasn't working out, Lance worked with a number of producers during 1966 and 1967, with only "Without a Doubt" scraping the R&B charts in 1968. He left OKeh shortly after that single, moving to Daka Records the following year, where he had the Top 40 R&B hit "Follow the Leader." Within a year, he moved to Mayfield's Curtom label, which resulted in his last two Top 40 R&B hits -- the number 13 "Stay Away From Me (I Love You too Much)" and "Must Be Love Coming Down."

Lance left Curtom later in 1971 and he moved through a variety of labels, including Volt and Columbia, over the next several years without much success. In 1972, he relocated to England, where Northern Soul -- a phenomenon of dance clubs playing rare, underappreciated and just plain obscure American soul and R&B records -- was in full force. For the next two years, Lance was a staple on the Northern Soul circuit, eventually returning to Atlanta in 1974. He signed with Playboy and released a disco version of "Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um" that became a minor hit, which was followed by a pair of minor hits in 1975. Shortly afterward, his career entered a downward spiral, and in 1978 he hit rock bottom when he was convicted of selling cocaine. Lance spent the next four years in prison. Upon his release, he began playing the Beach Music circuit on the Carolina coast, but a 1987 heart attack prevented him from launching a full-scale comeback. In 1994, Lance gave a final, triumphant performance at the Chicago Blues Festival, which turned out to be his last. He died of heart failure on September 3, 1994 at the age of 55, leaving behind a recorded legacy that stands among the best midwestern soul of the '60s.

~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

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