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Dr Martin Luther King


Dean

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Yep good man for posting this up. A decent telly programme on last week. It's easy to jump on the bandwagon of such a man - but what a man he was. His achievements are inspirational - his words sampled many times in our music.

I bow my head.

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Guest 2648 W Grand Boulevard

I also echo the sentiments above, what an inspirational leader no matter what race, creed, colour, or religion you were.

Dave

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I also would like to add my tribute to the man, have both the Gordy and Black Forum Lp's of speeches. Some very moving moments, thankfully saved for all time.

Now please take this as an observation and not my view. But interesting that when you speak to many that were politically active in the U.S. in the 60's, they veiwed him to be to simplistic and naive. Many sight Malcom X as the more definative voice off freedom, of that time.

I am not informed enough to pass comment, but think from what I know that both played an important part, in a change that has sadly, not yet been fully realised.

Malayka and I experienced a couple of occasions in the south on our recent trip, that shows this still to be true.

Edited by Dave Thorley
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Now please take this as an observation and not my view. But interesting that when you speak to many that were politically active in the U.S. in the 60's, they veiwed him to be to simplistic and naive. Many sight Malcom X as the more definative voice off freedom, of that time.

Malcolm X was a pretty radical ethnic nationalist and separatist. Malcolm's agenda for his people did not fit the agenda of the backers of MLK and the civil rights movement. Malcolm X was against integration and instead wanted independence and self rule for his people, in other words the complete opposite of the ideology that has been pushed by the media and the system in the Western World since the 1960's.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_nationalism

"Malcolm X Explains Black Nationalism"

Edited by Guest
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Malcolm X was a pretty radical ethnic nationalist and separatist. Malcolm's agenda for his people did not fit the agenda of the backers of MLK and the civil rights movement. Malcolm X was against integration and instead wanted independence and self rule for his people, in other words the complete opposite of the ideology that has been pushed by the media and the system in the Western World since the 1960's.

That's pretty accurate, but it should be pointed out that following his Hajj (pilgrimage) to Mecca in spring 1964, Malcolm (by then called El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz) altered his views on separation and race and advocated working with sympathetic whites to overcome racism. Ironically, this approach may have been more threatening to his enemies (of whom there were many, and in many places) and (IMO) it hastened his assassination.

Edited by TheHoneyDripper
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Purposely put this in "Look At Your Box", but no problem with discussion, interesting contributions too. Here's a slight aside: Would it be acceptable "entertainment" to use a sample or run in from these speeches as a record intro. I'm not sure where I stand on this, some thoughts around reducing important history to entertainment, some thoughts around education via entertainment, some more basic thoughts about "showing off" a bit of Motown history and record ownership. Never used it but thought about it.

Dave, have you got a scan/pic of the Lps you could post? I can recall one Gordy LP.

Anyway, on purpose ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .just to remember.

Dean

Edited by Dean
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Recent remix of Marvin Gaye - Whats Going On has the MLK I have a dream intro to it. Top tune!

All of the above about Malcolm X is true, after the Mecca pilgramage he ceased to view white people as 'devils' - Ironic how his faith was shaken in the not quite so honourable Elijah Mohammed who fathered children with some of his followers, forcing Malcolm to go his own way to the shagrin of the Nation - Ultimately leading to his demise at their hand with some prompting from the agency. MLK also not shy of extra marital activity and branded a hypocrite by some, gunned down by lone nut assassin James Earl Ray - orchestrated (some say) directly by Hoover at the FBI who despised King.

MLK - Still a well loved and missed icon. Not forgetting Robert Francis Kennedy also assassinated June 1968.

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Recent remix of Marvin Gaye - Whats Going On has the MLK I have a dream intro to it. Top tune!

All of the above about Malcolm X is true, after the Mecca pilgramage he ceased to view white people as 'devils' - Ironic how his faith was shaken in the not quite so honourable Elijah Mohammed who fathered children with some of his followers, forcing Malcolm to go his own way to the shagrin of the Nation - Ultimately leading to his demise at their hand with some prompting from the agency. MLK also not shy of extra marital activity and branded a hypocrite by some, gunned down by lone nut assassin James Earl Ray - orchestrated (some say) directly by Hoover at the FBI who despised King.

MLK - Still a well loved and missed icon. Not forgetting Robert Francis Kennedy also assassinated June 1968.

I can still remember seeing the early reports of RFK's assassination. Although really to young to fully understand, I did have a feeling that the world was going mad.

I made my earlier observation, particularly because on my recent trip I got into a conversation about the subject with a old member of the 'Panthers' in Detroit and a very vocal Syl Johnson, in Chicago. Things seem to run deep with them and still touches a nerve all these years later.

Both conversation were directed by them. I do not feel knowledgable enough to even start on such a subject, but found both fasinating.

Dave

PS, As for playing excerts as intro's, DJ's on the House and Hip Hop scenes have been doing this from day one. Some times it works, others it doesn't.

Edited by Dave Thorley
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Purposely put this in "Look At Your Box", but no problem with discussion, interesting contributions too. Here's a slight aside: Would it be acceptable "entertainment" to use a sample or run in from these speeches as a record intro. I'm not sure where I stand on this, some thoughts around reducing important history to entertainment, some thoughts around education via entertainment, some more basic thoughts about "showing off" a bit of Motown history and record ownership. Never used it but thought about it.

Dave, have you got a scan/pic of the Lps you could post? I can recall one Gordy LP.

Anyway, on purpose ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .just to remember.

Dean

Leroy Hutson's "time brings on a change" from his first LP uses a MLK speech. It's the first instance of 'sampling' a speech on a song that I can think of. Keith Leblanc had an electro hit in the early 80s with "no sellout" with malcolm x samples.

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Guest mel brat

Leroy Hutson's "time brings on a change" from his first LP uses a MLK speech. It's the first instance of 'sampling' a speech on a song that I can think of. Keith Leblanc had an electro hit in the early 80s with "no sellout" with malcolm x samples.

What about DJ Tom Clay "What the World Needs Now Is Love/Abraham, Martin and John" on Mowest?? (Issued here originally on Tamla Motown in 1971) - which samples speeches from Dr. King and Bobby Kennedy.

Admittedly, some might find it rather mawkish nowadays, but the "samples" still make the hairs stand up on the back of my neck on the rare occasion I play it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Clay

Whatever happened to idealism....?

Edited by mel brat
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The King family have always done their utmost to keep hip-hop artists from using samples of Martin Luther King-speeches, since they believe that hip-hop as a whole is so full of negativity and is incompatible with Martin Luther King´s sentiments.

As I´m sure most people on here know, Stevie Wonder was instrumental in making Martin Luther King´s birthday a national holiday in the US, hence his song "Happy Birthday" from the Hotter Than July LP.

Edited by djmelismo
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What about DJ Tom Clay "What the World Needs Now Is Love/Abraham, Martin and John" on Mowest?? (Issued here originally on Tamla Motown in 1971) - which samples speeches from Dr. King and Bobby Kennedy.

Admittedly, some might find it rather mawkish nowadays, but the "samples" still make the hairs stand up on the back of my neck on the rare occasion I play it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Clay

Whatever happened to idealism....?

good point, that did come first. leroy hutson actually made a good soul song though and used it to set the tone at the beginning, I always sort of thought of the tom clay as a novelty record

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The King family have always done their utmost to keep hip-hop artists from using samples of Martin Luther King-speeches, since they believe that hip-hop as a whole is so full of negativity and is incompatible with Martin Luther King´s sentiments.

As I´m sure most people on here know, Stevie Wonder was instrumental in making Martin Luther King´s birthday a national holiday in the US, hence his song "Happy Birthday" from the Hotter Than July LP.

It always grates on me when this is taken entirely out of context.

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