Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'BBC'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Soul Music
    • All About the SOUL
    • Look At Your Box
    • Site Support
    • Freebasing
    • Soul Media
  • Soul Music Sales
    • Record Sales
    • Record Wants
    • Soul Website Sales
    • Ebay Newsletters
    • General Sales & Wants

Guides

  • Online Events
  • Local Soul
  • Allnighters
  • Weekenders
  • Soul Nights
  • Alldayers
  • International
  • Live /Misc Events
  • archive
  • Soul Radio Guide

Categories

  • Soul Music News
  • Soul Music Articles
  • Northern Soul Hall Of Fame
  • Soul Event News
  • Freebasing

Categories

  • Soul Music Websites
  • Artists Websites
  • Record Shops
  • Soul Event Websites
  • Vinyl Reference Sites

Categories

  • Membership Help
  • Content Help
  • Forum help
  • Source Sales Features
  • Source Events Help
  • Source News & Articles Feature

Categories

  • Artists Singles
  • TV/Films
  • Artists Concerts/Interviews
  • Events Live
  • Video Bites
  • MIA

Product Groups

  • Subscriptions
  • Banners
  • Magazines

Marker Groups

  • Members Locations
  • Venues - Current
  • Venues - Historical
  • Labels, Studios etc
  • Record Shops

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Twitter


Email (public)


Phone Number (public)


Public Real Name


Interests


Location


Top Soul Sound


Local Events Range (miles)

 
or  

Ebay seller name


Discogs User Name

Found 49 results

  1. 2007 - Soul Britannia 1 of 3 - BBC 4 FIRST BROADCAST: Thu 8 Feb 2007 Soul Britannia is a music series that examines the dynamic impact of black American and Caribbean sounds on British music -- and on the very fabric of our society. From the 1950s to the present day, Soul Britannia investigates vinyl obsessions, Soul dancing, imitation, innovation -- and much more. With soul as its guiding light, the first film tracks the extraordinary musical changes that post-war Britain experienced. After the staid, uptight 1950s, the UK blossomed into an all-night, neon-lit soul-athon. From groovy Soho basements to "Ready Steady Go" TV specials, the music rocked the nation through the 1960s... The first film in the series examines how these sounds seeped into our culture via imported US vinyl, the music West Indian immigrants brought with them and the electric performances of touring American soul bands. Our traditional reserve was soon broken down. In fact, the impact on the British -- from London night spots to Welsh valleys, Newcastle music halls to the Belfast docks -- was quite devastating. And it made bright young things like Georgie Fame, Eric Burdon and Van Morrison feel extremely good, permeating their own musical output. The growing mass of Sixties Mods also embraced black music and helped popularize transatlantic sounds in the UK. They championed former American GI, Geno Washington, and Jamaican expatriate, Jimmy James, who became our very own soul stars. Dusty Springfield, too, dominated the charts and disseminated her love of Motown across the UK via TV specials. As the Sixties progressed, soul moved from the British underground into mainstream society, becoming a meeting point for black and white, a catalyst for cultural and sexual exchanges. This passion for Afro-American and Caribbean music -- and our interpretation of them -- created a fertile bed out of which an original British soul sound would grow in the 1970s and beyond. I Feel Good Soul Britannia Episode 1 of 3 Series that examines the dynamic impact of black American and Caribbean sounds on British music and society. A generation of young white music fans fell in love with black music in the 60s and sold it back to America while a generation of immigrants from the Caribbean helped introduce soul and ska to Britain and helped launch a new youth culture. Featuring rare archive performances and interviews with Van Morrison, Tom Jones, Solomon Burke, Elton John, Sam Moore, Georgie Fame and many others.
  2. Soul Source music video feature announcement - Music video just added to our in house soul video feature .... Name: BBC 4 - Soul Britannia 1 of 3 2007 Category: TV/Films Date Added: 29/07/20 Submitter: Source Video Description: 2007 - Soul Britannia 1 of 3 - BBC 4 FIRST BROADCAST: Thu 8 Feb 2007 Soul Britannia is a music series that examines the dynamic impact of black American and Caribbean sounds on British music -- and on the very fabric of our society. From the 1950s to the present day, Soul Britannia investigates vinyl obsessions, Soul dancing, imitation, innovation -- and much more. With soul as its guiding light, the first film tracks the extraordinary musical changes that post-war Britain experienced. After the staid, uptight 1950s, the UK blossomed into an all-night, neon-lit soul-athon. From groovy Soho basements to "Ready Steady Go" TV specials, the music rocked the nation through the 1960s... The first film in the series examines how these sounds seeped into our culture via imported US vinyl, the music West Indian immigrants brought with them and the electric performances of touring American soul bands. Our traditional reserve was soon broken down. In fact, the impact on the British -- from London night spots to Welsh valleys, Newcastle music halls to the Belfast docks -- was quite devastating. And it made bright young things like Georgie Fame, Eric Burdon and Van Morrison feel extremely good, permeating their own musical output. The growing mass of Sixties Mods also embraced black music and helped popularize transatlantic sounds in the UK. They championed former American GI, Geno Washington, and Jamaican expatriate, Jimmy James, who became our very own soul stars. Dusty Springfield, too, dominated the charts and disseminated her love of Motown across the UK via TV specials. As the Sixties progressed, soul moved from the British underground into mainstream society, becoming a meeting point for black and white, a catalyst for cultural and sexual exchanges. This passion for Afro-American and Caribbean music -- and our interpretation of them -- created a fertile bed out of which an original British soul sound would grow in the 1970s and beyond. I Feel Good Soul Britannia Episode 1 of 3 Series that examines the dynamic impact of black American and Caribbean sounds on British music and society. A generation of young white music fans fell in love with black music in the 60s and sold it back to America while a generation of immigrants from the Caribbean helped introduce soul and ska to Britain and helped launch a new youth culture. Featuring rare archive performances and interviews with Van Morrison, Tom Jones, Solomon Burke, Elton John, Sam Moore, Georgie Fame and many others. watch now... PLAY VIDEO: BBC 4 - Soul Britannia 1 of 3 2007 Soul Source Soul Music Video Feature
  3. note use the full screen option for best viewing Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music The Sound Of Young America - Ep 3/6 BBC Two May 21, 9.00-10.00pm Motown changed the landscape of pop, rewrote the rulebook and created the sound of young America, which appealed to whites as much as to blacks. Crossover soul was the vision of Motown's founder - Svengali figure Berry Gordy. "Motown was a little hit factory, and I got the idea from the assembly line that I worked in at an automobile plant," he explains. Reflecting the optimism of the early Sixties and the promise of integration, Gordy's artists were coached, groomed and targeted at the lucrative white audience. Gordy's crack song-writing team Holland/Dozier/Holland in Detroit pumped out 40 hits for artists such as The Supremes, Martha Reeves,The Temptations and The Four Tops. "If we didn't get the goose bumps or the hair standing on the arms, then something was missing," comments Lamont Dozier. His master strokes for cracking the uptown, white establishment was hiring both Maxine Powell, who ran the Artists Development finishing school, and white marketeer Barney Ales, who ensured that the company always got paid. Supreme Mary Wilson recalls: "It was Maxine Powell's job to refine us. She very early on told us that we were all diamonds, in the raw, and we needed refining." Over in Chicago, white-owned, family business Chess Records enviously eyed up Motown's success. Although the label already had a reputation for blues and black rock 'n' roll, they wanted a fresh sound that echoed the mood of the growing aspirational black population. By "sweetening" with strings and pop arrangements, the gritty Chicago sound was transformed into sophisticated soul. Etta James' Only Time Will Tell brought Chess a taste of crossover magic and Fontella Bass's hit Rescue Me emulated the Motown formula. As the mood of the nation changed, with the rise of the civil rights movement and protests over the Vietnam War, it was in Chicago - not Detroit - that music with a social conscience was first heard. In People Get Ready and Choice Of Colours Curtis Mayfield captured the zeitgeist and sang openly about community struggle and racial harmony.The Detroit riots were a huge wake-up call for Motown, who now seemed embarrassingly out of kilter. Cracks appeared in the company when, after a dispute about money, Holland/Dozier/Holland left, producer Mickey Stevenson departed and Supreme Flo Ballard was fired. But Gordy was a survivor and, determined to prove the company could move with the times, he released Love Child by Diana Ross and the Supremes.The song, which had a social message, became one of the biggest selling records in Motown's history. Gordy moved the business out to LA and it entered a second golden age. But the age of innocence for Motown was over BBC Soul Deep Episodes Online BBC Soul Deep Episode 1 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music -- The Gospel Highway BBC Soul Deep Episode 2 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - The Sound Of Young America BBC Soul Deep Episode 3 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - Southern Soul BBC Soul Deep Episode 4 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - Ain't It Funky BBC Soul Deep Episode 5 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - From Ghetto to Fabulous BBC Soul Deep Episode 6 - Story Of Black Popular Music
  4. Soul Source music video feature announcement - Music video just added to our in house soul video feature .... Name: Soul Deep Episode 3 - The Sound Of Young America BBC Category: TV/Films Date Added: 28/07/20 Submitter: Mike Video Description: note use the full screen option for best viewing Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music The Sound Of Young America - Ep 3/6 BBC Two May 21, 9.00-10.00pm Motown changed the landscape of pop, rewrote the rulebook and created the sound of young America, which appealed to whites as much as to blacks. Crossover soul was the vision of Motown's founder - Svengali figure Berry Gordy. "Motown was a little hit factory, and I got the idea from the assembly line that I worked in at an automobile plant," he explains. Reflecting the optimism of the early Sixties and the promise of integration, Gordy's artists were coached, groomed and targeted at the lucrative white audience. Gordy's crack song-writing team Holland/Dozier/Holland in Detroit pumped out 40 hits for artists such as The Supremes, Martha Reeves,The Temptations and The Four Tops. "If we didn't get the goose bumps or the hair standing on the arms, then something was missing," comments Lamont Dozier. His master strokes for cracking the uptown, white establishment was hiring both Maxine Powell, who ran the Artists Development finishing school, and white marketeer Barney Ales, who ensured that the company always got paid. Supreme Mary Wilson recalls: "It was Maxine Powell's job to refine us. She very early on told us that we were all diamonds, in the raw, and we needed refining." Over in Chicago, white-owned, family business Chess Records enviously eyed up Motown's success. Although the label already had a reputation for blues and black rock 'n' roll, they wanted a fresh sound that echoed the mood of the growing aspirational black population. By "sweetening" with strings and pop arrangements, the gritty Chicago sound was transformed into sophisticated soul. Etta James' Only Time Will Tell brought Chess a taste of crossover magic and Fontella Bass's hit Rescue Me emulated the Motown formula. As the mood of the nation changed, with the rise of the civil rights movement and protests over the Vietnam War, it was in Chicago - not Detroit - that music with a social conscience was first heard. In People Get Ready and Choice Of Colours Curtis Mayfield captured the zeitgeist and sang openly about community struggle and racial harmony.The Detroit riots were a huge wake-up call for Motown, who now seemed embarrassingly out of kilter. Cracks appeared in the company when, after a dispute about money, Holland/Dozier/Holland left, producer Mickey Stevenson departed and Supreme Flo Ballard was fired. But Gordy was a survivor and, determined to prove the company could move with the times, he released Love Child by Diana Ross and the Supremes.The song, which had a social message, became one of the biggest selling records in Motown's history. Gordy moved the business out to LA and it entered a second golden age. But the age of innocence for Motown was over BBC Soul Deep Episodes Online BBC Soul Deep Episode 1 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music -- The Gospel Highway BBC Soul Deep Episode 2 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - The Sound Of Young America BBC Soul Deep Episode 3 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - Southern Soul BBC Soul Deep Episode 4 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - Ain't It Funky BBC Soul Deep Episode 5 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - From Ghetto to Fabulous BBC Soul Deep Episode 6 - Story Of Black Popular Music watch now... PLAY VIDEO: Soul Deep Episode 3 - The Sound Of Young America BBC Soul Source Soul Music Video Feature
  5. Soul Weekender. Behind the scenes at the Caister Soul Weekender. Soul Weekender BBC Two England, 29 August 1998 23.00 A behind-the-scenes look at the annual soul festival staged at Caister-on-Sea, Norfolk. This year's festival, staged in May 1998, attracted 2,000 fans. Director Dario Poloni Shown on BBC2 on Saturday 29th August 1998, as part of Soul Night, a whole night of soul music programmes.
  6. 4 minute Northern related clip from BBC The People's History of Pop Episode 2 of 4 1966-1976: The Love Affair Fri 22 Jul 2016 more info via the below soul source news article. ...this Friday the second episode touches 'Northern Soul' and features an account by Cheryl Summers of her experiences of Wigan Casino Allnighters https://www.soul-source.co.uk/articles/news-soul/bbc-history-pop-northern-soul-wigan-casino/
  7. This programme features a report on the making of the short film 'Function at the Junction'. Also included is footage from the Hinckley Northern Soul nights with Derek Allen behind the decks. BBC Midlands Report - Northern Soul - 2001 includes venue clips, Derek Allen, Colin Curtis, Edwin Starr, Chris King and more Plus section on the making of 'Function at the Junction' film.
  8. Motor Citys Burning - Detroit from Motown to the Stooges BBC 4 2008 Documentary looking at how Detroit became home to a musical revolution that captured the sound of a nation in upheaval. In the early 60s, Motown transcended Detroit's inner city to take black music to a white audience, whilst in the late 60s suburban kids like the MC5 and the Stooges descended into the black inner city to create revolutionary rock expressing the rage of young white America. With contributions from Iggy Pop, Alice Cooper, George Clinton, Martha Reeves, John Sinclair and the MC5. Fri 7 Mar 2008 22:00hrs ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Featured on Soul Source back in 2008 via a review by Rob Moss aka @Rob Moss A clip of the original review can still be found here I love Detroit — ‘Motor City’s Burning’ Review By Rob Moss -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  9. BBC Northern Soul Living For The Weekend BBC4 2014 The northern soul phenomenon was the most exciting underground British club movement of the 1970s. At its highpoint, thousands of disenchanted white working class youths across the north of England danced to obscure, mid-60s Motown-inspired sounds until the sun rose. A dynamic culture of fashions, dance moves, vinyl obsession and much more grew up around this - all fuelled by the love of rare black American soul music with an express-train beat. Through vivid first-hand accounts and rare archive footage, this film charts northern soul's dramatic rise, fall and re-birth. It reveals the scene's roots in the mod culture of the 1960s and how key clubs like Manchester's Twisted Wheel and Sheffield's Mojo helped create the prototype that would blossom in the next decade. By the early 1970s a new generation of youngsters in the north were transforming the old ballrooms and dancehalls of their parents' generation into citadels of the northern soul experience, creating a genuine alternative to mainstream British pop culture. This was decades before the internet, when people had to travel great distances to enjoy the music they felt so passionate about. Set against a rich cultural and social backdrop, the film shows how the euphoria and release that northern soul gave these clubbers provided an escape from the bleak reality of their daily lives during the turbulent 1970s. After thriving in almost total isolation from the rest of the UK, northern soul was commercialized and broke nationwide in the second half of the 70s. But just as this happened, the once-healthy rivalry between the clubs in the north fell apart amidst bitter in-fighting over the direction the scene should go. Today, northern soul is more popular than ever, but it was back in the 1970s that one of the most fascinating and unique British club cultures rose to glory. Contributors include key northern soul DJs like Richard Searling, Ian Levine, Colin Curtis, Kev Roberts, alongside Lisa Stansfield, Norman Jay, Pete Waterman, Marc Almond, Peter Stringfellow and others. The northern soul phenomenon was the most exciting underground British club movement of the 1970s. At its highpoint, thousands of disenchanted white working class youths across the north of England danced to obscure, mid-60s Motown-inspired sounds until the sun rose. A dynamic culture of fashions, dance moves, vinyl obsession and much more grew up around this - all fuelled by the love of rare black American soul music with an express-train beat. Through vivid first-hand accounts and rare archive footage, this film charts northern soul's dramatic rise, fall and re-birth. It reveals the scene's roots in the mod culture of the 1960s and how key clubs like Manchester's Twisted Wheel and Sheffield's Mojo helped create the prototype that would blossom in the next decade. By the early 1970s a new generation of youngsters in the north were transforming the old ballrooms and dancehalls of their parents' generation into citadels of the northern soul experience, creating a genuine alternative to mainstream British pop culture. This was decades before the internet, when people had to travel great distances to enjoy the music they felt so passionate about. Set against a rich cultural and social backdrop, the film shows how the euphoria and release that northern soul gave these clubbers provided an escape from the bleak reality of their daily lives during the turbulent 1970s. After thriving in almost total isolation from the rest of the UK, northern soul was commercialized and broke nationwide in the second half of the 70s. But just as this happened, the once-healthy rivalry between the clubs in the north fell apart amidst bitter in-fighting over the direction the scene should go. Today, northern soul is more popular than ever, but it was back in the 1970s that one of the most fascinating and unique British club cultures rose to glory. Contributors include key northern soul DJs like Richard Searling, Ian Levine, Colin Curtis, Kev Roberts, alongside Lisa Stansfield, Norman Jay, Pete Waterman, Marc Almond, Peter Stringfellow and others.
  10. Roll over Beethoven - The Chess Records Saga Legends Chicago's Chess Records was one of the greatest labels of the post-war era, ranking alongside other mighty independents like Atlantic, Stax and Sun. From 1950 till its demise at the end of the 60s, Chess released a myriad of electric blues, rock 'n' roll and soul classics that helped change the landscape of black and white popular music. Chess was the label that gave the world such sonic adventurers as Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, Howlin' Wolf and Etta James. In this documentary to mark the label's 60th anniversary, the likes of Jimmy Page, Mick Hucknall, Public Enemy's Chuck D, Paul Jones and Little Steven, as well as those attached to the label such as founder's son Marshall Chess, pay tribute to its extraordinary music and influence. The film reveals how two Polish immigrants, Leonard and Phil Chess, forged friendships with black musicians in late 1940s Chicago, shrewdly building a speciality blues label into a huge independent worth millions by the end of the 1960s. Full of vivid period detail, it places the Chess story within a wider social and historical context - as well as being about some of the greatest music ever recorded, it is, inevitably, about race in America during these tumultuous times.
  11. BBC Northern Soul Soul Survivors Close Up North from 2000 A BBC North 30 minute northern soul documentary that takes a fairly detailed and entertaining look at all things Northern. Ritz Brighouse, Scene History, Mod Culture, and a lengthy Cleethorpes Weekender segment (The 9th Willie Tee One). Many familiar faces. Edwin Starr, Dave Godin, Richard Searling, Ady Croasdell, Dave Leedham and daughter and many more Only shown in BBC North's Close Up North catchment area but of a high production quality Note clip has been edited to remove a bbc dj.
  12. BBC Local Tv Clip from 2006 BBC Midlands Today Northern Soul 'And The Beat Goes on' 2006
  13. BBC Documentary | Once Upon A Time In New York: The Birth Of Hip Hop, Disco & Punk. Mon 5 Mar 2007 21:00 BBC Four DURATION: 1 HOUR How the squalid streets of '70s New York gave birth to music that would go on to conquer the world - punk, disco and hip hop. In the 1970s the Big Apple was rotten to the core, yet out of the grime, grit and low rent space emerged new music unlike anything that had gone before. Inspired by the Velvet Underground, a new wave of 'punk' rock emerged in lower Manhattan including The New York Dolls, The Ramones and the Patti Smith Group. Meanwhile, downtown loft parties held by gay New Yorkers heralded the birth of disco, which would eventually spawn the ultimate club for the privileged few: Studio 54. The swanky mid-town discos were out of bounds to black New York so in the Bronx DJs such as Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa created their own parties, heralding the birth of hip hop. With David Johansen, Patti Smith, John Cale, Richard Hell, Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, Kool Herc, Nile Rodgers, Chuck D, Tommy Ramone, Chris Stein, Fab 5. Freddy, Lenny Kaye, Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz, Syl Sylvain, Nicky Siano, David Mancuso, DJ AJ, David Depino, Jayne County, Leee Childers, Nelson George, Victor Bokris and Vince Aletti
  14. BBC Breakfast 20th December 2011. Pete Waterman and Elaine Constantine discuss Northern Soul. 2011 Northern Soul on BBC Breakfast
  15. BBCs Inside Out programme will feature a special on Northern Soul on Monday 1st September 7.30pm BBC1 Yet another slightly embarrassing TV feature about Northern Soul. Presented by the now infamous Ashley Blake. Broadcast in the midlands by the BBC in 2004. Filmed in various locations, including Stoke, Alsager & Stourport. (My home town) two parter - use the second link for full show
  16. BBC Everyman - E is for Ecstasy - Rave Documentary 1992 BBC 2 documentary televised in 1992. Programme follows the lives of a small group of Ecstasy users and their experiences of the rave scene in the early 1990's. Programme seeks to determine individual motivation for Ecstasy use and provides discussion from medical experts and users regarding some of the possible harmful long term effects. Please note: the first 5 minutes are missing
  17. Broadcast around 1990, this programme covers Ska, Reggae, Northern Soul, Punk, New Romantics, Hip Hop & Rave and more. This section features Reggae, Northern Soul, Old Skool Hip Hop, Breakdancing and...er....Bros. added by site includes clips from previous BBC programmes - Something Else - Skelmersdale and Omnibus (1978) https://www.soul-source.co.uk/topic/211634-can-you-id-the-source-of-film/
  18. From the early 90s a fairly decent 5 minute catch up of the Northern Soul Scene back then
  19. BBC 1 Inside Out Northern Soul Wigan Casino Final Allnighter Segment
  20. A recent clip from the BBC show, The One Show Blackpool Tower Northern soul dancing competition segment -14 Nov 2019 more info via https://www.soul-source.co.uk/forums/topic/402589-bbc-msm-northern-soul-alert-the-one-show-tonite/
  21. BBC Wales news report concerning northern soul vinyl bootleggers. Broadcast November 2018
  22. EPISODE GUIDES Soul Deep - The Story Of Black Popular Music The Birth Of Soul - Ep1/6 BBC Two 7 May, 9.00-10.00pm Soul music has conquered the world in the last 50 years - growing from the raw, electric rhythms of the black underclass, it is now a billion dollar industry with R&B and hip-hop dominating the world's charts. It's been the soundtrack to some of the most extraordinary social, political and cultural shifts. And, together with the civil rights movement, it has challenged the white hegemony, helped breakdown segregation and encouraged the fight for racial equality. This new six part series, made by the BBC team who produced the critically-acclaimed Lost Highway,Walk On By and Dancing In The Street series, charts the evolution of soul music -with a fascinating combination of rare archive and contemporary interviews. From rhythm and blues to today's R&B, via gospel, southern soul, Motown, funk and hip-hop soul, Soul Deep tells the story of the rise of black popular music - in the words of its greatest performers, producers, musicians and commentators. Starting with a previously unseen BBC interview with Ray Charles, he reveals how his innovations first brought soul to a wider audience. "Ray was the genius. He turned the world onto soul music," comments Bobby Womack. The term rhythm and blues was coined by Billboard Magazine journalist Jerry Wexler after he was asked by his editor to find an alternative for the label 'race music'. After many years touring on what was known as the 'chitlin' circuit' (a network of black clubs and bars) with artists like Ruth Brown, Ray finally created his own style - by unifying the sexually-charged music of the dance floor with the spiritually-charged sounds of the church hall. Life was hard and sometimes dangerous for black musicians in a segregated society. Ruth Brown explains: "When the dance was over sometimes it was so scary we wanted to get out of town as soon as we could.There were still crosses burning in the middle of the night.There was a price paid for this music." The creation of the Atlantic record label took the music to a wider, more mainstream audience. Ahmet Ertegun who, with his brother Nesuhi, started the label, says: "We had a good feel for where the music was going. Our target audience in the beginning was the black audience - which understands the music they like.Their tastes change and, once they change, don't go back." As the black sounds crossed the racial divide, rhythm and blues gave birth to rock 'n' roll - a far more sanitised version of the black sound which was seen to be "too uninhibited, too loose, and too sweaty." Ray Charles says: "Rock 'n' roll is the white version of rhythm and blues.There was a big difference, if you really listened to the music, between the two styles. One is more pure, one is more dirty. R&B has got more toe jam in it." Black artists were squeezed out of the mainstream charts by white covers of their songs and Charles looked back to his roots for his inspiration and the creation of his own distinctive sound. He quotes his mother's influence in his music and his fusion of gospel and sheer dance hall sex. "I started taking my music and saying it the way that I felt it - the gospel sound that was part of my growing up. I knew all I was doing was being myself." With backing singers the Raylettes, Charles further honed his own sound, much to the chagrin of the church community. Charles' biographer Michael Lydon describes: "He went for a completely uninhibited gospel sound but made it sexual.The Raylettes became the choir behind the preacher." Another young gospel singer was hot on the heels of Ray Charles - James Brown's hit Please, Please, Please in 1956 was the embodiment of the black American experience. It spoke of the hurt as well as the hopes and aspirations of an underclass. "If you really enjoy it, the spirit comes out," Brown tells Soul Deep BBC Soul Deep Episodes Online BBC Soul Deep Episode 1 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music -- The Gospel Highway BBC Soul Deep Episode 2 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - The Sound Of Young America BBC Soul Deep Episode 3 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - Southern Soul BBC Soul Deep Episode 4 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - Ain't It Funky BBC Soul Deep Episode 5 - Story Of Black Popular Music BBC Soul Deep - The Story of Black Popular Music - From Ghetto to Fabulous BBC Soul Deep Episode 6 - Story Of Black Popular Music
  23. Soul Source music video feature announcement - Music video just added to our in house soul video feature .... Name: Soul Weekender Caister BBC 2 1998 Category: TV/Films Date Added: 07/07/20 Submitter: Source Video Description: Soul Weekender. Behind the scenes at the Caister Soul Weekender. Soul Weekender BBC Two England, 29 August 1998 23.00 A behind-the-scenes look at the annual soul festival staged at Caister-on-Sea, Norfolk. This year's festival, staged in May 1998, attracted 2,000 fans. Director Dario Poloni Shown on BBC2 on Saturday 29th August 1998, as part of Soul Night, a whole night of soul music programmes. watch now... PLAY VIDEO: Soul Weekender Caister BBC 2 1998 Soul Source Soul Music Video Feature
  24. Soul Source music video feature announcement - Music video just added to our in house soul video feature .... Name: BBC Everyman - E is for Ecstasy - Rave Documentary 1992 Category: Video Bites Date Added: 02/05/20 Submitter: Mike Video Description: BBC Everyman - E is for Ecstasy - Rave Documentary 1992 BBC 2 documentary televised in 1992. Programme follows the lives of a small group of Ecstasy users and their experiences of the rave scene in the early 1990's. Programme seeks to determine individual motivation for Ecstasy use and provides discussion from medical experts and users regarding some of the possible harmful long term effects. Please note: the first 5 minutes are missing watch now... PLAY VIDEO: BBC Everyman - E is for Ecstasy - Rave Documentary 1992 Soul Source Soul Music Video Feature
  25. Soul Source music video feature announcement - Music video just added to our in house soul video feature .... Name: BBC Once Upon A Time in New York BBC4 2004 Category: TV/Films Date Added: 02/05/20 Submitter: Mike Video Description: BBC Documentary | Once Upon A Time In New York: The Birth Of Hip Hop, Disco & Punk. Mon 5 Mar 2007 21:00 BBC Four DURATION: 1 HOUR How the squalid streets of '70s New York gave birth to music that would go on to conquer the world - punk, disco and hip hop. In the 1970s the Big Apple was rotten to the core, yet out of the grime, grit and low rent space emerged new music unlike anything that had gone before. Inspired by the Velvet Underground, a new wave of 'punk' rock emerged in lower Manhattan including The New York Dolls, The Ramones and the Patti Smith Group. Meanwhile, downtown loft parties held by gay New Yorkers heralded the birth of disco, which would eventually spawn the ultimate club for the privileged few: Studio 54. The swanky mid-town discos were out of bounds to black New York so in the Bronx DJs such as Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa created their own parties, heralding the birth of hip hop. With David Johansen, Patti Smith, John Cale, Richard Hell, Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, Kool Herc, Nile Rodgers, Chuck D, Tommy Ramone, Chris Stein, Fab 5. Freddy, Lenny Kaye, Tina Weymouth, Chris Frantz, Syl Sylvain, Nicky Siano, David Mancuso, DJ AJ, David Depino, Jayne County, Leee Childers, Nelson George, Victor Bokris and Vince Aletti watch now... PLAY VIDEO: BBC Once Upon A Time in New York BBC4 2004 Soul Source Soul Music Video Feature


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.