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Sceneman

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  • Public Real Name
    brain
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    london
  • Top Soul Sound
    got you on my mind

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  1. a blocked mod wandering around soho at night could get rolled for a packet of gum as they were in short supply in the am
  2. One of England's top rock & roll outfits before the Beatles led the early-'60s Beat Boom, Johnny Kidd & the Pirates are best remembered today for one international rock classic ("Shakin' All Over") and as a seminal influence on several more famous groups, most notably the Who. Johnny Kidd (born Frederick Heath) had formed his first band, a skiffle group called the Five Nutters, in 1957. They quickly outgrew their skiffle roots and, after a short period fronting the Fred Heath Combo, he joined Alan Caddy (guitar), Tony Docherty (rhythm guitar), and Ken McKay (drums), in early 1958 in an
  3. yea i used to live in fulham all my life so passed the zeta house most days ,its had a few clubs over the years
  4. https://www.facebook.com/MyForthcomingBookModsTheNewReligion/ smilers fb page for the book
  5. fred heath and the nutters,, didnt know the freight train had a basement and i worked locally just across the road incidently the cue club had a bad rep so we didnt go there due to the stabbings and murders there the el partido was ok though with thumping ska on the top floor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xXhU7-4W2Q
  6. The Freight Train was opened on the corner of Berwick Street and Noel Street by skiffle player Chas McDevitt early in 1958, following the success of his record of the same name. Initially it hosted impromptu sessions, where musicians such as Diz Disley and Les Bennetts would jam into the night. It was also the venue for an early performance by Cliff Richard and the Drifters in June 1958. Unlike many other local establishments, however, the coffee bar’s basement was not transformed into a music club. Instead the Freight Train served as, “a rendezvous for many of the London-based groups, a p
  7. all these ads for blue beat and island and king labels 45s but it wasnt easy to buy them as u had to order them for next week ,,nowhere stocked them all..i used to hang around a shop in shepherds bush market where they sold jamaican imports and blue beat but you didnt know what was good or bad even though they played a lot of records and it was loud on speakers outside the small shop..i was the only white man there at the shop .the titles were on a chalked blackboard outside the shop in top ten format but a few were calypso on the early island issues..i dont recall where they got any air play
  8. club cards for the attic hounslow and pontiac club putney the attic didnt have much ambiance and was small .the pontiac was better but the owner didnt pay me for my DJ ing there so didnt carry on
  9. i forgot to mention when levi denims suddnely became available .out of the blue ,there was a hardware shop in the kings road chelsea at the fulham end that sold boiler suits overalls and boots and mods discoverd the levi denims in there for quite a cheap fee. the shop had the front missing due to a german bomb and as you went by on the bus all the insides were on display ..just some tarpaulins hung down over the front from the missing roof to keep the rain out..levis were a bit more loose than dickys ideal for riding a scooter and then we found the ex USAAF fish tail parkas to complete the en
  10. there was a few fashionable shop selling bit and pieces but it was still the era of montegue burtons and the full monty ,when guys couldnt afford to buy a whole suit in one go ,so bought the jacket trousers and waist coat sepeartely till they had ''the full monty''.. suits were paid for on weekly terms .. a mod lusted after a mohair suit and then came the mullet haircut but i dont know where from !! some wore leather coats and jackets at the scene club this was only less than 20years after WW2 so most folks were hard up and had no TV or housephone just a valve radio and the lond
  11. i would say in the london R and B clubs but i cant be sure as it was changing fast about then ,it kinda evolved from who knows where ,others may have more info than me .. the flamingo sound system was pretty poor compared with the scene clubs sound system and the choice of records was better at the scene club as DJ guy stevens had a large collection of just about everything you could think of, all fresh from the US..on the visits to the flamingo on record nights i was surprised at the lousy selection of tunes they had and the lack of volume and bass on their piddling sound system .so on
  12. on saturday we used to get news of who we missed at the scene club during the week ,all big names like bo diddley or little richard used to appear there with no warning ,even the who alegedly played there ..before going into the scene we used to have a swift half in one of the local boozers or the macabre coffee bar in an alley way off wardor street .now it seems to be a basement flat occupied by humans.. the macabre coffee bar had a juke box on which a kathy kirby single ''dance on'' was heard
  13. to get in to see jay hawkins at the flamingo was if my memory seves me was 1 pound 17 shillings and sixpence ,,same as most other top name acts from the US and a teenage mods salary was around 2-3pounds as an apprentice so it was a chunk of the wages ,whereas a record night was 10 shillings at most R and B clubs in soho .although the althabet club was 10 shillings on saturday all nighter and weekday record sessions at most clubs ..we had long debates about can we afford it but came to the conclusion we couldnt afford to see jay hawkins or major lance or the soul sisters..ggrrrr rumour had
  14. a trip to the door of the scene club i managed to get a video before the hotel was built dont forget to read the comments on youtube by ex mods and members

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