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Rick Cooper

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Rick Cooper last won the day on June 2 2016

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About Rick Cooper

  • Birthday 23/03/1953

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Stockport
  • Top Soul Sound
    One More Hurt by Marjorie Black

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  1. A lucky squirrel found one of last year's apple crop and sat on the fence just outside the shed window.
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  2. Last Saturday Radio 2 had a program about London clubs around Soho in the 1960s by Carl Leighton-Pope with some music played in the clubs. It doesn't go into great detail but might be worth a listen. https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0004rtz
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  3. I don't get this ad for Hilton Hotels. Is the woman a celebrity, if not why have they made her like an over excited annoying teenager. Anyway I don't think anything would make me want to go to a Hilton
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  4. Purist Some good points here, but a few things in the last paragraph I'm not in complete agreement with. Taking your example of Bobby Bell , RCA made a decision to sign him, pick some songs, rehearse him, pay session musicians, arranger, producer and studio time. Then have a record made with all the production costs, maybe have some photos done, perhaps buy a stage outfit, arrange a few live shows and mail out loads of promos. All this could be charged against Bobby's sales royalties but still had to be paid for even if some were in-house. This must amount to a large investment by RCA but then you state that to spend a couple of hundred dollars on stock copies would affect cash flow. I can't quite see how this makes sense for any company as they only get cash flow by selling records. If they then only press stock when they get orders how many orders do they want before pressing the record, 500 ,700 ,1000? Then if these sell what would the next press be 300, 500? What would happen to the orders from shops and distributors if they never pressed any stock? I can't see shop owners being too pleased to order a record without any idea when and if they would get it or not and the artist and his manager would be livid. Having imported, exported, sold wholesale and retail records for a few companies in the UK from 1972 to 1990 the main lesson I learnt was to get the stock in as many shops as possible as quickly as possible. The average customer would have a few pounds to spend and maybe three or four singles they wanted. If the shop didn't have their first choice they might settle for second or third choice but if the shop didn't have those they would go somewhere else. Almost no one would be prepared to wait whilst the shop ordered a record that might take weeks to arrive ,if at all. By next week there would be some other records they want. So every record shop would make an effort to get records in stock before the customers asked for them. Also record companies would go to great lengths to get their product in store. Although the Virgin shop I worked for was not on the chart returns list we still got reps calling in with new stock or phone outs from the company sales department. I can't see US teenagers being any different to here and record companies would be just as keen to get their releases in stores, even offering sale or return facilities. One other point is, if the companies held back on pressing stock until a record took off there would be a lot more titles, probably hundreds, on promo only and it would happen across every label. The handful of titles known on promo only are down to exceptional circumstances, such as legal problems , artist army call up, fraud , Dave's "shenanigans" or something else unusual. Rick
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  5. Ed The unsold copies of Purple Haze on Cream weren't destroyed and I think after a few years were sold off. It seems to be fairly common, selling for around £15. If you've got a US Brunswick demo that is probably a lot rarer and worth more. Brunswick seems to be one label where promos are scarcer than stock copies and a lot more collectable. Rick
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  6. A rack... luxury.....what's wrong with the floor. Yes, records were usually mistreated by teenagers and end up in the bin however some radio stations weren't much better. The only US radio station I got to visit had the records for that show lying around on the desk and the rest skewered on short poles on the wall, all unsleeved. They didn't have a library but were only a tiny station in the middle of nowhere. Rick
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  7. Ed There's a story behind Purple Haze that ties in with this thread. The deal to issue the record on Cream was done with William Bell who produced the song via his Wilbe Productions. We issued the record but two weeks later it came out on UK Brunswick through Decca. After a few strongly worded letters and solicitors intervention we had to pull the record as we couldn't get the required documents from William Bell to prove the US Brunswick deal had expired. It's probably just as well as Decca had more money for lawyers and you wouldn't want to mess with Nat Tarnopol in the US, if you know what's good for you and don't want to have an "accident". The promos would have been sent out about 7 to 10 days before the release date so had Decca issued their record earlier we might have never been able to sell stock copies, but the promos would have been out there, a bit like the Darrell Banks on London v Stateside story. I think the Cream version probably sold about 5 to 6 hundred. Like almost everyone else I thought there was a line in Purple Haze that goes "Scuze me whilst I kiss this guy" but apparently it's "Scuze me whilst I kiss the sky", which may have made sense to Jimi Hendrix under certain circumstances. Rick
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  8. Chalky I've read something similar but I think it was when the royalties were calculated 10% was deducted from the sales figure to allow for freebies, faulty or lost copies. Rick
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  9. Ed I've never been that keen on the theory that record companies would only press stock copies if the record took off. It doesn't make sense to spend all that money on a recording session, mastering, labels etc to not spend a bit more having something ready to sell. Pressing promos and stock copies could be done at the same time for hardly much extra, having a second press of stock copies later would cost more per disc. Possibly mono/stereo promos might be done separately as the machine would have to be set up again. I've never read any evidence for this and suspect the idea started as musings amongst collectors in the 1970/80s to explain why some records hadn't been seen on stock copies. Since then some of these records have turned up on stock copies, such as Sam Williams on Tower. A few records are only known as promos but this is explained by special circumstances such as King pulling Junior McCants when he died just before the record came out. All the copies would have been destroyed , just a few promos escaping the crusher. Similarly Darrell Banks on UK London stock copy was supposed to have never been made until the one copy turned up, the rest being destroyed. It would be good to have some irrefutable evidence about how many records companies usually pressed but prior to the oil crisis in the 70s the cost of records was so cheap that they probably made a lot more than we might think. The only figures I've seen are for the Imaginations -Strange Neighborhood on Fraternity. @ady croasdell's sleeve notes on the Kent CD Classiest Rarities quote "Interestingly 3500 regular labels and 5000 demo labels were ordered for the first pressing, indicating why issues are sometimes rarer than DJ copies". Still some confusion here as the figures are for labels not records and each record needs two labels. Maybe Ady has some more figures he could share with us. When I issued records on Cream in the 70s I'd order loads of extra labels as they were very cheap, the pressing company held these for us to avoid delay if a quick re press was needed. Rick
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  10. Tomo If you're talking about US records on bigger labels from the 60s and 70s the rarity of some stock copies is down to what happened to them after they had finished selling. The record companies would send promos and stock copies to their distributors who would then try to get them on local radio or TV.Some promo copies would be given away to DJs and stock copies could be ordered by local shops. If the record didn't take off stock copies still at the distributors could be sent back for credit but the promos were a write off for the label so might be thrown away or after a while end up in a warehouse or bargain bins. When the stock copies got back to the record label they could sell them off , after drilling the deletion hole, or scrap them. For some labels I suppose they didn't want shops full of their flops so they destroyed a lot of stock copies, hence the rarity of some records. Rick
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  11. There are a couple of lines in Skiing In The Snow I'm not sure if I've got right- "Snows a falling up on the hill Gotta get my gear(?) I'm ready for winter chill" Then later on "A week in bed (?) with my love There's nothing better I know" If these aren't right then they should be.
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  12. My dad was a bit of an audiophile and would build amps and speakers from kits. One of his early tape machines was a British Ferrograph. A beast of a machine, heavy, solid and built to last, which it did ,but I sold it about ten years ago, fetched a decent price. He then got an Akai like the one in the photo. At the time I think this must have been considered one of the best. I've got it now but it's boxed up in the loft , I'm not sure if I'll ever use it but worth keeping for now. Gave away loads of his tapes. My grandad had a Grundig which I used for a while but I don't remember it being great. When I was about 12 I had a tiny reel to reel machine which I used to tape programs from the radio and records . Still got the tapes but they didn't sound much good when I last played them. I recorded Mike Raven's R n B and Soul show on Sunday nights but always stopped recording when Mike came on. If only I had just taped the whole show they would have been a lot more interesting.
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  13. and meths in the afternoon
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  14. The view from the back door this morning, my workshop just visible through the bushes Managed to do the daily commute up the steps.
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  15. Zan, there's a name from the past. I think he was from Manchester or Stockport area. As a youngest I was told about some of the things that could happen to a stranger at the Wheel. One involved being relieved of money , records or a nice jacket by characters like Zan. Probably totally untrue.
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