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Otis Redding


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Guest WPaulVanDyk

I like Otis Redding but would love to know what Northern tracks he made. Higher and Higher is one i think of

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None king.gif we decide whether they`re northernsoul :ohmy: "cant turn you loose"still does it for me.

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I like Otis Redding but would love to know what Northern tracks he made. Higher and Higher is one i think of

Surely some mistake... :ohmy:

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Guest TONY ROUNCE

I like Otis Redding but would love to know what Northern tracks he made. Higher and Higher is one i think of

"Got To Get Myself Together", from one of his posthumous LPs, is one of the most relenltless stompers of all time (a bit like Donald Lee Richardson's "You Got Me In The Palm Of Your Hand"). I'm sure that if it had been by any artist other than Otis it would have been played out and raved over years ago...

TONE :ohmy:

Edited by TONY ROUNCE
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Guest TONY ROUNCE

DOH!

...Not much of a Redding fan then, Pete?

TONE (whose hero Otis is....) :ohmy:laugh.gifyes.gif

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THANKS FOR THAT,SORRY NOT IMPRESSED

OTIS.GOTTA,GOTTA ,GOTTA.

That's an old criticism applied by soulies who didn't like that fact that he was popular and preferred their music filtered through the Detroit Strings and Motown's Quality control.

Amongst Otis's endearing faults were half learning other people's songs thereafter repeating the first verse and chorus throughout the song. As he released four live albums he appears to have spent half his time on stage testifying. Although he was a superb live artist who really connected with UK audiences. He enjoyed himself on stage, did not take himself too seriously but could break your heart with the next song.

On the other hand his use of brass as a choral background and the response to his call provided some wonderful moments on record. E.g. Fa fa fa fa Sad song and Call me Mr. Pitiful. He was fond of borrowing other people's songs but usually applied a twist and came at them with a different perspective. e.g. Lowell Fullson's Tramp which Otis turned into a memorable duet with Carla Thomas, Sam Cooke's Yeah man which he turned into Sweet Soul Music for Arthur Conley.

Most of Otis's recordings do not fit in the traditional northern templates but with Loving by the Pound being played out and the increasing influence of R&B Love Man has been picked up (I blame Dirty Dancing). I'm sure younger DJ's without the prejudices will pick up other stuff like his versions of Shake, Papa's got a brand new bag and 634 5789.

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'Loving By The Pound' is Otis' big Northern sound, previously unissued in the 60s....think it came out on a white demo but is on a cd which was released a few years back.

Got played last Sat in Skeggy. Absolute stormer!

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Guest Rowly

try these two mate, they are (at the mo') my fave Otis tracks

Otis_Redding___She_s_Alright.mp3

Otis_Redding_Look_At_That_Girl.mp3

Kev - Daft question to ask you of all people, I know, ..... but you flipped over 'She's Alright' ??

The other side "Tuff Enuff" is a belter too! whistling.gif

Edited by Rowly
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Kev - Daft question to ask you of all people, I know, ..... but you flipped over 'She's Alright' ??

I have indeed Rowly whistling.gif The flip is a lot earlier sounding than the a-side dont you think.

Great choon. Might give it a spin at Spondon at the Alldayer........never played it out before

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Guest TONY ROUNCE

That's an old criticism applied by soulies who didn't like that fact that he was popular and preferred their music filtered through the Detroit Strings and Motown's Quality control.

Amongst Otis's endearing faults were half learning other people's songs thereafter repeating the first verse and chorus throughout the song. As he released four live albums he appears to have spent half his time on stage testifying. Although he was a superb live artist who really connected with UK audiences. He enjoyed himself on stage, did not take himself too seriously but could break your heart with the next song.

On the other hand his use of brass as a choral background and the response to his call provided some wonderful moments on record. E.g. Fa fa fa fa Sad song and Call me Mr. Pitiful. He was fond of borrowing other people's songs but usually applied a twist and came at them with a different perspective. e.g. Lowell Fullson's Tramp which Otis turned into a memorable duet with Carla Thomas, Sam Cooke's Yeah man which he turned into Sweet Soul Music for Arthur Conley.

Most of Otis's recordings do not fit in the traditional northern templates but with Loving by the Pound being played out and the increasing influence of R&B Love Man has been picked up (I blame Dirty Dancing). I'm sure younger DJ's without the prejudices will pick up other stuff like his versions of Shake, Papa's got a brand new bag and 634 5789.

Well said, that man. 'd been looking for the right words to come to Otis' defence myself, but you seem to have found them all. Especially where his horn arrangements were concerned (and the one on his marvellous version of "Higher Than Higher" is of premium quality).

Having said that, I do realise that only a very few of his sides are likely to appeal to the Northern-only fan - but any deep soul fans who summarily turn their nose up at Otis (as many of them seem to do) are worthy of considerable scorn. The man made some of the genre's most stellar recordings. How could anyone not fail to be perpetually moved by the likes of "Good To Me", "I Love You More Than Words Can Say", "I've Got Dreams To Remember" or "I've Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)"?

As you say, Otis' accessibility and popularity damned him in the eyes of the same people who clasp James Carr, O.V. Wright and their ilk to their collective bosom and bang on about how much better they are than Otis. The simple fact is that these, and other equally brilliant artists in the deep soul genre are not better than Otis, although many are as good and that's a huge complement to their talents. And I have no doubt whatsoever that they would have been among the first to tell you that they were not better than Otis, had you asked them during their lifetimes.

People who dismiss Otis Redding's work out of hand today, just aren't listening...

TONE whistling.gif

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...Not much of a Redding fan then, Pete?

TONE (whose hero Otis is....) whistling.gif:ohmy::lol:

Yeah / no / don't know....I kind of like him but wouldn't consider myself a fan but I'm not really a lover of artists, more of records they made. If you'd have asked me that question when I was 15 I'd have said he was the greatest thing since the spacehopper...

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Yeah / no / don't know....I kind of like him but wouldn't consider myself a fan but I'm not really a lover of artists, more of records they made. If you'd have asked me that question when I was 15 I'd have said he was the greatest thing since the spacehopper...

-------------------------------------

At least Pete Smith is being honest about himself, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with JUST being a soul music RECORD collector, so credit to you Mr Smith ...

As for Otis Redding, his "Demonstration" 45 is pure classic style stomping NORTHERN SOUL !!!! A bit like Johnnie Taylor's "Changes" , which old timers tell me was massive at the Wheel !!!

whistling.gif

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not defending my taste, ,just higher & higher dosnt do it for me

i respect anyone who gets on stage to perform,cant be easy

takes a lot of guts,win or loose

Otis_Redding___Loving_By_The_Pound.mp3

Johnny_Taylor___Changes.mp3

Otis_Redding___Love_Man.mp3

Otis___Redding_____Shake____Live..mp3

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Kev - Daft question to ask you of all people, I know, ..... but you flipped over 'She's Alright' ??

The other side "Tuff Enuff" is a belter too! whistling.gif

My preference is Tuff Enuff, very nice good and loud :ohmy:

Love Loving By The Pound and Look At That Girl, but I'm generally an Otis fan anyway

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I think Otis is the greatest soul singer of all time. He epitomises soul music. He wasn't the most technically gifted but the sheer guts, power and emotion you can't beat him.

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'Loving By The Pound' is Otis' big Northern sound, previously unissued in the 60s....think it came out on a white demo but is on a cd which was released a few years back.

Got played last Sat in Skeggy. Absolute stormer!

It's Not just sentimental is the album that has Loving by The Pound and it came out on Cassette, CD and vinyl.

Given it was an album of outakes that had not been included on other posthumous releases it had some pretty good songs on it as well as alternate takes.

https://cd.ciao.co.uk/Productinformation/It...edding__5950812

It was also issued as "Remember Me" Otis Redding

https://tinyurl.com/jtmc4

Edited by FrankM
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QUOTE(FrankM @ May 27 2006, 03:19 PM) post_snapback.gif

That's an old criticism applied by soulies who didn't like that fact that he was popular and preferred their music filtered through the Detroit Strings and Motown's Quality control.

Amongst Otis's endearing faults were half learning other people's songs thereafter repeating the first verse and chorus throughout the song. As he released four live albums he appears to have spent half his time on stage testifying. Although he was a superb live artist who really connected with UK audiences. He enjoyed himself on stage, did not take himself too seriously but could break your heart with the next song.

On the other hand his use of brass as a choral background and the response to his call provided some wonderful moments on record. E.g. Fa fa fa fa Sad song and Call me Mr. Pitiful. He was fond of borrowing other people's songs but usually applied a twist and came at them with a different perspective. e.g. Lowell Fullson's Tramp which Otis turned into a memorable duet with Carla Thomas, Sam Cooke's Yeah man which he turned into Sweet Soul Music for Arthur Conley.

Most of Otis's recordings do not fit in the traditional northern templates but with Loving by the Pound being played out and the increasing influence of R&B Love Man has been picked up (I blame Dirty Dancing). I'm sure younger DJ's without the prejudices will pick up other stuff like his versions of Shake, Papa's got a brand new bag and 634 5789.

Well said, that man. 'd been looking for the right words to come to Otis' defence myself, but you seem to have found them all. Especially where his horn arrangements were concerned (and the one on his marvellous version of "Higher Than Higher" is of premium quality).

Having said that, I do realise that only a very few of his sides are likely to appeal to the Northern-only fan - but any deep soul fans who summarily turn their nose up at Otis (as many of them seem to do) are worthy of considerable scorn. The man made some of the genre's most stellar recordings. How could anyone not fail to be perpetually moved by the likes of "Good To Me", "I Love You More Than Words Can Say", "I've Got Dreams To Remember" or "I've Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)"?

As you say, Otis' accessibility and popularity damned him in the eyes of the same people who clasp James Carr, O.V. Wright and their ilk to their collective bosom and bang on about how much better they are than Otis. The simple fact is that these, and other equally brilliant artists in the deep soul genre are not better than Otis, although many are as good and that's a huge complement to their talents. And I have no doubt whatsoever that they would have been among the first to tell you that they were not better than Otis, had you asked them during their lifetimes.

People who dismiss Otis Redding's work out of hand today, just aren't listening...

TONE wink.gif

I absolutely agree with these comments. Otis was a great soul singer, surely one of the best of all time.

I often smile when I hear him getting the words slightly wrong, Lesley used to say it was one of his charms. An enthusiast for the songs (especially of Sam Cooke) but who got so carried away he got the lyrics wrong.

I can still remember the first time I heard I've Been Loving You Too Long, some time before it was issued in the UK. It just knocked me sideways, the lyrics were so true for me at that time. Also love his version of A Change Is Gonna Come, he gets the words wrong but the emotion is so strong. One of the great deep soul singers imo.

Also a good producer, Baby Cakes by Loretta Young.

I saw him at Finsbury Park when he toured (was it 66 or 67?). He was brilliant on stage, I can still see him in my mind striding up and down the stage, did a lot of his songs faster than the record, but most seemed to do that then. Years ago I saw a film of the Stax revue live in Paris. I've always wanted to get that as it brought back great memories. Anyone on here know anything about it?

Probably too raw and Southern generally for the Northern scene but worth delving into for those who don't know his material.

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Guest lifeandsoul

As for Otis Redding, his "Demonstration" 45 is pure classic style stomping NORTHERN SOUL !!!! A bit like Johnnie Taylor's "Changes" , which old timers tell me was massive at the Wheel !!!

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QUOTE(FrankM @ May 27 2006, 03:19 PM) post_snapback.gif

That's an old criticism applied by soulies who didn't like that fact that he was popular and preferred their music filtered through the Detroit Strings and Motown's Quality control.

Amongst Otis's endearing faults were half learning other people's songs thereafter repeating the first verse and chorus throughout the song. As he released four live albums he appears to have spent half his time on stage testifying. Although he was a superb live artist who really connected with UK audiences. He enjoyed himself on stage, did not take himself too seriously but could break your heart with the next song.

On the other hand his use of brass as a choral background and the response to his call provided some wonderful moments on record. E.g. Fa fa fa fa Sad song and Call me Mr. Pitiful. He was fond of borrowing other people's songs but usually applied a twist and came at them with a different perspective. e.g. Lowell Fullson's Tramp which Otis turned into a memorable duet with Carla Thomas, Sam Cooke's Yeah man which he turned into Sweet Soul Music for Arthur Conley.

Most of Otis's recordings do not fit in the traditional northern templates but with Loving by the Pound being played out and the increasing influence of R&B Love Man has been picked up (I blame Dirty Dancing). I'm sure younger DJ's without the prejudices will pick up other stuff like his versions of Shake, Papa's got a brand new bag and 634 5789.

Well said, that man. 'd been looking for the right words to come to Otis' defence myself, but you seem to have found them all. Especially where his horn arrangements were concerned (and the one on his marvellous version of "Higher Than Higher" is of premium quality).

Having said that, I do realise that only a very few of his sides are likely to appeal to the Northern-only fan - but any deep soul fans who summarily turn their nose up at Otis (as many of them seem to do) are worthy of considerable scorn. The man made some of the genre's most stellar recordings. How could anyone not fail to be perpetually moved by the likes of "Good To Me", "I Love You More Than Words Can Say", "I've Got Dreams To Remember" or "I've Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)"?

As you say, Otis' accessibility and popularity damned him in the eyes of the same people who clasp James Carr, O.V. Wright and their ilk to their collective bosom and bang on about how much better they are than Otis. The simple fact is that these, and other equally brilliant artists in the deep soul genre are not better than Otis, although many are as good and that's a huge complement to their talents. And I have no doubt whatsoever that they would have been among the first to tell you that they were not better than Otis, had you asked them during their lifetimes.

People who dismiss Otis Redding's work out of hand today, just aren't listening...

TONE wink.gif

I absolutely agree with these comments. Otis was a great soul singer, surely one of the best of all time.

I often smile when I hear him getting the words slightly wrong, Lesley used to say it was one of his charms. An enthusiast for the songs (especially of Sam Cooke) but who got so carried away he got the lyrics wrong.

I can still remember the first time I heard I've Been Loving You Too Long, some time before it was issued in the UK. It just knocked me sideways, the lyrics were so true for me at that time. Also love his version of A Change Is Gonna Come, he gets the words wrong but the emotion is so strong. One of the great deep soul singers imo.

Also a good producer, Baby Cakes by Loretta Young.

I saw him at Finsbury Park when he toured (was it 66 or 67?). He was brilliant on stage, I can still see him in my mind striding up and down the stage, did a lot of his songs faster than the record, but most seemed to do that then. Years ago I saw a film of the Stax revue live in Paris. I've always wanted to get that as it brought back great memories. Anyone on here know anything about it?

==========

a video of otis is available and ive got it in my loft

got booker t and sam and dave on it too but when otis comes on the crowd go mad,,

he was pretty sensational wasnt he?

left us with some great trax

these arms of mine

respect

mr pitiful

along with mr pickettand aretha awesome artists

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A film was made of Otis Redding and the Stax Volt tour of Europe in 1967. DA Pennebaker also filmed Otis and Booker T and The MG's at Monterey. They have been shown in bits and pieces on TV and there was a VCR issued in 1992.

According to all music at https://tinyurl.com/o7pmw

it is available on DVD as Remembering Otis.

on sale here for a fiver

https://tinyurl.com/qcem4"]https://tinyurl.com/qcem4

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Guest TONY ROUNCE

A film was made of Otis Redding and the Stax Volt tour of Europe in 1967. DA Pennebaker also filmed Otis and Booker T and The MG's at Monterey. They have been shown in bits and pieces on TV and there was a VCR issued in 1992.

According to all music at https://tinyurl.com/o7pmw

it is available on DVD as Remembering Otis.

on sale here for a fiver

https://tinyurl.com/qcem4

...If you hunt around you may also be able to find the "Ready Steady Go" Otis special, which was issued on VHS (and Betamax!) in 1984. It's a fantastic documentation of Otis in 1966, and it also features Chris Farlowe and Eric Burdon (or 'Burton' as Otis announces him - it wasn't only lyrics he had trouble remembering, obviously...)

If anyone's looking for a way to get into Otis, and doesn't know which album to try first, I would always point people in the direction of "Tell the Truth" - his last posthumous album, with the brilliant dancers "I Got the Will" and "The Match Game" as well as killers like "Wholesale Love", "Give Away None Of My Love" and the aforementioned "Demonstration" - and its predecessor "Love Man", for the relentless "Got To Get Myself Together", the sublime deepie "I'll Let Nothing Saparate Us", a very basic but powerful "Your Feeling And Mine" and , of course, the wicked "Look At the Girl" (which is actually called "I Got To Go Back" - it's a Bert Berns song that was originally cut on Bang by the McCoys) , "Higher And Higher" and the title track.

The guy actually made better records dead than most people manage to do while alive...

TONE :)

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but any deep soul fans who summarily turn their nose up at Otis (as many of them seem to do) are worthy of considerable scorn. The man made some of the genre's most stellar recordings. How could anyone not fail to be perpetually moved by the likes of "Good To Me", "I Love You More Than Words Can Say", "I've Got Dreams To Remember" or "I've Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)"?

People who dismiss Otis Redding's work out of hand today, just aren't listening...

TONE :)

Well, I certainly wouldn't dismiss Otis' work out of hand. But to compare in the same breath with James Carr and O.V. Wright at his peak suggests that you are still in thrall with 'Mr. Soul' .

I once had to entertain a middle-aged Canadian couple who knew nothing at all about soul music but knew of people like Della Reese and Nancy Wilson and they worshipped Frank Sinatra. In other words they simply knew a thing or two about good vocalists.

During the course of the evening I played them a few things that I thought they might enjoy ( not having any Francis Albert singing against those Nelson Riddle strings to hand) and these were an album of Otis ballads which I was and still am very fond of and one of James Carr's final stabs at making a few dollars. The name of that CD escapes me all I can remember is the year which was about 1990 and the fact that Carr's voice was still

great if not quite up to his early Goldwax recordings. Which singers did the unbiased folk who knew a great vocalist when they heard it prefer? Well, James Carr of course.

Since then I have often played Otis aginst Carr ,and for me the even greater O.V. Wright, to 'civilians' who have a fondness for a good vocalist. None have given Otis five and many have been genuinely angry that they have spent years of their lives without knowing what truly great soul singers sound like and how they can move us.

Edited by Billy Freemantle
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