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Headsy

Damaged records....who claims ?

So I sell a record on Discogs and post first class 17th june.

I then get a message this morning saying no damage to packaging but snapped clean through from centre to edge on one side.

This is first chance buyer has had due to shifts to play it.

The record was mint minus....

Do I claim off PO?

Does buyer claim?

I have never had a claim for a broken record over many years of selling.

 

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Under distance selling rules goods that are sent are still owned by the seller until the buyer accepts the merchandise. If there is an issue in transport, the seller has to reimburse the buyer and make a claim against the shipping company.

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So I claim off post office?

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How do you declare value as it's based on what you paid for it. Do you show PayPal receipt?

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Headsy said:

How do you declare value as it's based on what you paid for it. Do you show PayPal receipt?

Hi Headsy I have claimed a few times off the P.O,(I sell loads of records on ebay and facebook,not discogs though,There is a online claim form The po  will reimburse you up to a certain amount depending how you sent it, 1st class,2nd,signed for etc.,you must provide copies (uploads) of all relevant documents,I.E paypal,discogs proof of posting and take pictures of the packaging and the record,hope this helps,Jimmy

Edited by amitwiirly
spelling mistake

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Value is what you sold it for

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The post office will do everything they can to avoid paying compensation.  Their own rules regarding packaging state must be shipped in padded packaging, i.e. a Jiffy bag.  Standard card mailer and card inserts they won't pay out for.

It is the responsibility of the seller to ensure the buyer receives his purchase in the condition described.  The seller is the one who makes the claim.

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I've never had to show a picture of packaging and have claimed a number of times over the years...never had one not paid out on to date and sold thousands..also a claim form from post office if you don't want to do it online.

Up to £20 standard post £50 if signed for

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Headsy said:

So I sell a record on Discogs and post first class 17th june.

I then get a message this morning saying no damage to packaging but snapped clean through from centre to edge on one side.

This is first chance buyer has had due to shifts to play it.

The record was mint minus....

Do I claim off PO?

Does buyer claim?

I have never had a claim for a broken record over many years of selling.

 

This is simple, you absolutely need to get the buyer (if they are outside the UK they cannot claim) to send you PDF images of the damaged packaging and record damage (I put in my Terms and Conditions on Discogs). Then complete a claim on line and on this occasion I have to disagree with Karl as they paid me out last month on a £50 order to Russia (standard mailer with cardboard packing) (The Post Office would have to ban the use of such mailers if they did not want to pay out). They won't pay the Postage Costs though which I still think is scandalous as we have paid those costs for a service.

Edited by Blackpoolsoul
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Again I always send a form from post office which has column for value and one for cost of postage and have recieved full amount for both.....rarely had a problem and on the 2 occasions I have been paid fully when I rang up to complain afterwards

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, Blackpoolsoul said:

This is simple, you absolutely need to get the buyer (if they are outside the UK they cannot claim) to send you PDF images of the damaged packaging and record damage (I put in my Terms and Conditions on Discogs). Then complete a claim on line and on this occasion I have to disagree with Karl as they paid me out last month on a £50 order to Russia (standard mailer with cardboard packing) (The Post Office would have to ban the use of such mailers if they did not want to pay out). They won't pay the Postage Costs though which I still think is scandalous as we have paid those costs for a service.

I'm glad they paid you out but I am just stating their own requirements and I know plenty who haven't been paid out, one last year got £5 for an £750 sale that went wrong.

All mine go in a jiffy rather than card mailer, often with both.

Edited by Chalky

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25 minutes ago, Jkpnefc said:

Again I always send a form from post office which has column for value and one for cost of postage and have recieved full amount for both.....rarely had a problem and on the 2 occasions I have been paid fully when I rang up to complain afterwards

That is good but there are plenty of accounts where sellers have had nothing but disappointment from the post office.  I've never had one go wrong fortunately and fingers crossed it'll stay that way.

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Seller’s responsibility, in the original scenario described. If the item doesn’t get to the first point of contact with the buyer, in the condition described, at the time the deal was struck, then it’s for the seller to make good.

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10 hours ago, Chalky said:

I'm glad they paid you out but I am just stating their own requirements and I know plenty who haven't been paid out, one last year got £5 for an £750 sale that went wrong.

All mine go in a jiffy rather than card mailer, often with both.

Crickey Karl, I would have fought that one assume you covered it for £750 ?

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11 hours ago, Blackpoolsoul said:

Crickey Karl, I would have fought that one assume you covered it for £750 ?

I always send mine in proper card record mailers and have always been paid out,got a book of stamps last time for postage as well

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Bottom line is we should be encouraging indestructible packaging at all times. The very mention of Jiffy bags makes me cringe. High end items should go in a box then in another box - that way, you avoid the Manship Don Gardner scenario... USA sellers generally use special 7 inch mailers of varying thicknesses, which when combined with multiple cardboard stiffeners, offer ideal protection, especially when taped together so the disc(s) can not move in transit. UK sellers prefer thin cardboard envelopes with thin card stiffeners which do the job satisfactorily more often than not, but this method seems to be popular because the lighter weight keeps postal costs lower.

Ultimately, the seller has a moral (and financial) obligation to ensure that goods posted come to no harm, so if a record breaks in the post, the seller should assume responsibility. USA dealers sometimes hide behind the ‘not responsible for postal mishandling clause’ then use inferior packaging - the trick is to spot this  in advance, then request adequate packaging.

The thinner the packet, the more likely it is to snap. If selling, we should always use thick packaging as this is what we would expect if we were buying.

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12 hours ago, Frankie Crocker said:

Bottom line is we should be encouraging indestructible packaging at all times. The very mention of Jiffy bags makes me cringe. High end items should go in a box then in another box - that way, you avoid the Manship Don Gardner scenario... USA sellers generally use special 7 inch mailers of varying thicknesses, which when combined with multiple cardboard stiffeners, offer ideal protection, especially when taped together so the disc(s) can not move in transit. UK sellers prefer thin cardboard envelopes with thin card stiffeners which do the job satisfactorily more often than not, but this method seems to be popular because the lighter weight keeps postal costs lower.

Ultimately, the seller has a moral (and financial) obligation to ensure that goods posted come to no harm, so if a record breaks in the post, the seller should assume responsibility. USA dealers sometimes hide behind the ‘not responsible for postal mishandling clause’ then use inferior packaging - the trick is to spot this  in advance, then request adequate packaging.

The thinner the packet, the more likely it is to snap. If selling, we should always use thick packaging as this is what we would expect if we were buying.

Mine go in a normal mailer with card inserts and then inside jiffy bag, as per postal requirements.  Not taking any chances for the sake of 15/20p. Jiffy also offers better protection especially with styrene. 

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Mine was packed in 7 inch mailer with 2 inners.

It was styrene so I reckon it was snapped being removed....... when I get a record delivered, I have always cut a mailer down the back after opening with scissors and then removed inner card then record as just pulling the inners out can stress the record, as it is a tight fit.

I guess some people dont think about it and just yank it out....

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6 hours ago, Headsy said:

Mine was packed in 7 inch mailer with 2 inners.

It was styrene so I reckon it was snapped being removed....... when I get a record delivered, I have always cut a mailer down the back after opening with scissors and then removed inner card then record as just pulling the inners out can stress the record, as it is a tight fit.

I guess some people dont think about it and just yank it out....

Sounds very likely. Easing records from tight envelopes can be fiendish. Taping the stiffeners together helps avoid extricating problems. Putting the record in a paper sleeve then in a card sleeve adds extra protection. Recycling USA mailers is better than using new cardboard envelopes as they can be cut open easily. A razor blade is better than a scissors for cutting through tape - it’s usually best to avoid hacking into cardboard with any sharp metal blade eg box-cutter, scissors. 

Styrene records can be so much trouble as they are brittle and can have a weaknesses from the pressing process long before they are put into mailers for posting.

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Posted (edited)

Oh  I do it properly trust me !

Knife to open mailer then scissors to cut the back   I also pack paper sleeve and a card sleeve with 4 x tape around when I mail out.

Been packing and opening records a long time  !!

Edited by Headsy

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topic closed by starter

as always request that if you do close your topic can you please post saying so and if possible add the reasons

that helps avoids any misunderstandings etc

thanks

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This topic is now closed to further replies.

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