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Dave Rimmer

Buddy Bailey / Jay Jay Bailey

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44 minutes ago, Dave Rimmer said:

Simple question, are Buddy Bailey and Jay Jay Bailey, who both released singles on the Tina label, one and the same guy ?

And does anyone know what Tina 502 is ?

Tina Records

 

I wonder if J R Bailey and Jay Jay Bailey are more likely to be the same guy than Buddy Bailey and JJ?

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Yeah, that crossed my mind as well, but have nothing to confirm it either way. And I suspect it would be J J Bailey rather than J R Bailey ?

I just thought it unlikely that two guys with the surname Bailey would record for a label with only 7 releases, especially as one of the guy's names is Buddy, which is likely to be a nickname.

Questions, questions, questions :lol:

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OK, a little more digging leads me to believe that Jay Jay Bailey is not J R Bailey. Mostly because the Tina label is from Greenboro NC, and J R Bailey doesn't appear to have ever recorded outside New York. He was born in Baltimore, and died in New York, so I can't find any North Carolina connection there at all.

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Curt Moore owned Tina Records & ran his record shops ...   More info on Curt's ........

In the postwar United States, record stores like Curt’s (here) in Greensboro, North Carolina, were perhaps the place where consumers most commonly interacted with people who made their living from popular culture. Conservative estimates suggest that at least 400 to 500 black-owned record stores—and probably closer to one thousand—were in operation throughout the region during this period. Photograph courtesy of Curt Moore (here), owner of Curt’s.

Records is a market that can be used to brighten the future of lots of black people with jobs and higher prestige all over the country,” Jimmy Liggins announced in 1976 to the readers of the Carolina Times, Durham, North Carolina’s most prominent African American newspaper. Liggins, a minor rhythm and blues star of the 1950s, was publicizing his Duplex National Black Gold Record Pool, headquartered in Durham, which sought to “help and assist black people to own and sell the music and talent blacks produce.” With the aid of this “self helping program,” aspiring hit-makers could record and release music that Black Gold sold through mail order and at Liggins’s shop, Snoopy’s Records, in downtown Durham.1

Kenny Mann vividly recalls his frequent trips to Snoopy’s as a teenager in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Liggins “was like a god” to Mann and other young customers who patronized the store. “Everybody knew” Liggins and his two business partners, Henry Bates and Paul Truitt. “These guys, I was listening to them talk about bringing Tyrone Davis and Johnny Taylor and Al Green to town . . . It was fun to go [to their store] because it felt like the place to be; there were girls in there, and I was twelve, thirteen years old.” Not only that, but Mann “never felt the pressure to buy something” like he did in stores in his hometown of Chapel Hill, where white shopkeepers frequently followed young African American shoppers around their businesses, suspecting they might shoplift. “They had a double standard,” Mann remembers. Chapel Hill “really was set up as if they didn’t want to do business with us black people.” In sharp contrast, Liggins envisioned Snoopy’s as “our mall”—a “hang out” where black consumers could buy black music in a record store owned and operated by African Americans. Black-owned record stores like Snoopy’s represented a crucial nexus where African American enterprise, consumer culture, community, and of course, music all met. And by the early 1970s, Liggins was booking and promoting shows for Mann’s band, which eventually became Liquid Pleasure, the popular Chapel Hill-based funk and soul outfit still active today.

Edited by Roburt

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40 minutes ago, RobbK said:

Did Buddy Bailey have a connection to The Carolinas?  I thought he was from Washington, D.C.

He must have had because his sole release for Tina was a duet with Curt Moore, which I presume is the label owner from Greenboro.

 

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37 minutes ago, Gotsoul said:

Are we speaking of the Buddy Bailey who sang lead in The Clovers?

That's what I assume.  Buddy Bailey went solo in the early '60s.

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Well Buddy Bailey's real name was John .... if he had a middle name ... say Jerome (guessing here) .... that would make him J J Bailey OR Jay Jay Bailey ....

.... a guy trying for a new image (coz he was known for stuff that was 10 years old), could easily have gone for a slight name change .. OR ... as Buddy, he could still have been signed to a deal elsewhere. 

Do we know if Tina #900 came before or after Tina #503 ??

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I think Gotsoul has provided the answer. It was John 'Buddy' Bailey who sang lead with The Clovers. I just never made the connection, yet the information was there on my own website all the time. Doh !

It means I need to amend The Clovers discography, and delete the Buddy Bailey and the Jay Jay Bailey discographies. Nice to have a mystery solved though. Thanks to everyone who contributed.

Now, what was Tina 502 ?

 

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Hmmmm, a bit more digging has revealed that John 'Buddy' Bailey had the middle initial H !

John H 'Buddy' Bailey (b. 29th December 1931, Seneca, Virginia, U.S.A. d. 3rd February 1994,Henderson, Nevada, U.S.A. - lead)

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