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Ady Croasdell

Naughty Boy: Jackie Day

Guest GARV

I can`t believe people bother to express there dislike for a record when stories like this are history. Its not about the record, it could be any record played & discovered in this scene`s silly & beautiful complex history , Its the people involved . We are lucky to have their definitive account of what went down.

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It was a 21st party at The Top of the World in Derby according to Guy, played it three times in a row. Then later at Stafford.

That sounds about right - think it may have been the Meadows Club

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Kev Roberts told me that Johnnie Cochran (yes, the OJ Simpson Johnny Cochran) was Jackie Day's boyfriend and he owned the label.

The linked article said that Johnny Cochrane, SENIOR owned the label. But that can't be right, as he'd have been too old to like that kind of "new music", as Junior was born in 1937 (and would have been 29 in 1966). So, it must have been THE Johnny Cochrane, Jr. who owned it. It was interesting to find out also that Jackie Day's first husband was Blues/R&B band leader, Big Jay McNeely.

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The linked article said that Johnny Cochrane, SENIOR owned the label. But that can't be right, as he'd have been too old to like that kind of "new music", as Junior was born in 1937 (and would have been 29 in 1966). So, it must have been THE Johnny Cochrane, Jr. who owned it. It was interesting to find out also that Jackie Day's first husband was Blues/R&B band leader, Big Jay McNeely.

You're discounting a very detailed and specific webpage with personal photos because you think someone was too old to like soul music? You know older people (like Bobby Robinson) had rap record labels when rap came out, right? You don't think an old person can have a soul music label?

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Not forgetting the handful(?) of copies that surfaced on ebay from the same seller a couple of years now was it? I think they came from L.A dealer and from (memory) a closed store. Was this the same store / source as the 'West Coast' find JM & others were involved in?

Pat's closed down near the end of the '60s or 1970 or so. So I doubt that. But, the record must have been distributed to several record shops in South-Central and South Los Angeles (Black Ghetto). Dolphin's of Hollywood, Sam's and Flash probably carried it along with Pat's. I looked through the stock of Herman Griffith's Record Shop (DJ with KGFJ and producer on Joker Records), but didn't see it. Maybe they were rather from the Oakland Music City find? Most of those stores closed many, many years ago.

Edited by RobbK

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You're discounting a very detailed and specific webpage with personal photos because you think someone was too old to like soul music? You know older people (like Bobby Robinson) had rap record labels when rap came out, right? You don't think an old person can have a soul music label?

Ha! Ha! I, myself, was pretty old when I was a co-owner of Airwave Records. And, I guess an old guy who owned a record company (albeit only out of his house and not a big cash cow) could have a young girlfriend, too. Actually, in the article, the author has a question mark placed after the "Sr.". So he wasn't sure. I'm just guessing that Jr., at age 29, was Jackie's Boyfriend, rather than his father at age 55. Again, I ruin my own theory, as my current girlfriend is only 22. Still, I'm betting that the owner was the successful Lawyer, Johnny, Jr.

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agree Pete, always thought this was a mess of a record, never a fave of mine, tho i can see it's appeal to the masses, so to recap then , probably 50 or so copies have turned up in the last half dozen years or so, yeah...

I listened to it again, and it sounds tinny. The mixing quality is poor. But, as stated above, the sax solo is fantastic. Anyone know who played it?

Anyone know who Cyril D. Roberts was? I can't remember if I've seen his name on any other L.A. '60s Soul records. He produced and arranged it. I think he may have been a low-level local band leader.

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Must be. Just seen this quote on SoulfulDetroit site. Exaggeration? Tongue in Cheek? Who knows. As Mr Tag states.all copies seem to have gone now anyway.

'Richard Searling announced this on his radio show and mentioned that enough copies of Jackie Day's 'Naughty Boy' were found to wedge his studio door open'

I should have bought the one that Brownie offered me instead of trying to get the extra £50 discount which he keeps reminding me about (how many do you see for sale now?) oh! so true. Stupid of me Darren i should have listened!! and yes I remember Bobby James as well! Doh!

Edited by mrtag

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I can`t believe people bother to express there dislike for a record when stories like this are history. Its not about the record, it could be any record played & discovered in this scene`s silly & beautiful complex history , Its the people involved . We are lucky to have their definitive account of what went down.

I realise this was a defining record for the scene in the Stafford era - I just wondered if i was in a minority in not liking it thats all Garv. If other people love it great, even though I dont like it I appreciate the story surrounding it as well especially the fact that it was dug out in 1967 - amazing!

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I realise this was a defining record for the scene in the Stafford era - I just wondered if i was in a minority in not liking it thats all Garv. If other people love it great, even though I don't like it I appreciate the story surrounding it as well especially the fact that it was dug out in 1967 - amazing!

I wouldn't call my purchasing it "dug out". I was a "Ghetto Child" buying the music I liked, near the time it was out. I bought so many records that I couldn't afford to buy them all at the retail 89¢ to $1.00. So, I waited for the non-hits to hit the 2 for $1.00, 3 for $1.00, 4 for $1.00, 5 for $1.00, 10 for $1.00 or 3 for $25¢ bins, and thrift stores and junk stores and furniture and book stores. I was a university student, not working, and with little cash. There were many thousands of records I had to leave (looking from 1953-1972) because I couldn't afford to pay the extra 10¢ to $1.00 each! Maybe I should have become a dealer and earn my living off of it. But, I went a different route. I'd rather be a cartoonist, in any case.

Most record shops had a little 45 player we could use to play them. Ah, the Good Ol' Days!

While I was in L.A. attending university (UCLA), I used to drive all over South Central on Saturdays, looking for records. Invariably, I'd cross paths with Steve Propes when visiting thrift stores. He usually got the better finds because he delivered pies in a truck and gave pies to the workers in the thrift stores to keep the new records in the back of the store for him to get first look.

Edited by RobbK

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Without finding my notes ( and that aint gonna happen any time soon) my guess would be 1984-85. Here's my thinking. Guy says he started DJ'ing at TOTW summer 83 and it wasn't in his early sets. The record lasted as a popular dancefloor record for quite a decent amount of time at TOTW, so it probably wasnt anywhere near the end.

From memory pretty sure Guy told me he played it at somewhere like Derby at a soul nite or some club where there was a party where lots of soulies were, then later the same nite he played it for the first time at Stafford, so it's first Niter play was at TOTW (unless Rod or Dave played it anywhere? but I've never heard anybody say that)

btw it's the first record I use when somebody who doesn't know what Northern is, asks to hear the sound of N/S.

that derby night was possibly at the meadows pub, i can remember one night happening and there may have been others, long time ago, btw that record always reminds me of age creeping up, dancing to it=knackered, and that was years ago :(

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I wouldn't call my purchasing it "dug out". I was a "Ghetto Child" buying the music I liked, near the time it was out. I bought so many records that I couldn't afford to buy them all at the retail 89¢ to $1.00. So, I waited for the non-hits to hit the 2 for $1.00, 3 for $1.00, 4 for $1.00, 5 for $1.00, 10 for $1.00 or 3 for $25¢ bins, and thrift stores and junk stores and furniture and book stores. I was a university student, not working, and with little cash. There were many thousands of records I had to leave (looking from 1953-1972) because I couldn't afford to pay the extra 10¢ to $1.00 each! Maybe I should have become a dealer and earn my living off of it. But, I went a different route. I'd rather be a cartoonist, in any case.

Most record shops had a little 45 player we could use to play them. Ah, the Good Ol' Days!

While I was in L.A. attending university (UCLA), I used to drive all over South Central on Saturdays, looking for records. Invariably, I'd cross paths with Steve Propes when visiting thrift stores. He usually got the better finds because he delivered pies in a truck and gave pies to the workers in the thrift stores to keep the new records in the back of the store for him to get first look.

that is a great post mate,u must have many record hunting stories to tell,could you tell us more please ?not sure which section of site it should go in though,i love this kind of stuff

Edited by arnie j

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I wouldn't call my purchasing it "dug out". I was a "Ghetto Child" buying the music I liked, near the time it was out. I bought so many records that I couldn't afford to buy them all at the retail 89¢ to $1.00. So, I waited for the non-hits to hit the 2 for $1.00, 3 for $1.00, 4 for $1.00, 5 for $1.00, 10 for $1.00 or 3 for $25¢ bins, and thrift stores and junk stores and furniture and book stores. I was a university student, not working, and with little cash. There were many thousands of records I had to leave (looking from 1953-1972) because I couldn't afford to pay the extra 10¢ to $1.00 each! Maybe I should have become a dealer and earn my living off of it. But, I went a different route. I'd rather be a cartoonist, in any case.

Most record shops had a little 45 player we could use to play them. Ah, the Good Ol' Days!

While I was in L.A. attending university (UCLA), I used to drive all over South Central on Saturdays, looking for records. Invariably, I'd cross paths with Steve Propes when visiting thrift stores. He usually got the better finds because he delivered pies in a truck and gave pies to the workers in the thrift stores to keep the new records in the back of the store for him to get first look.

Thats even crazier! Sorry I dont know who you are or what your background is, maybe you could tell us more? I would be really interested. Did you know what records you were unearthing or was it pure luck?

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Thats even crazier! Sorry I dont know who you are or what your background is, maybe you could tell us more? I would be really interested. Did you know what records you were unearthing or was it pure luck?

Why is this crazy? I think it's more "crazy" that '60s and '70s American Soul music became a "scene" (phenomenon) in which the prices of individual 45 RPM records accelerated to outlandish heights (making it almost impossible for us North American soul fans to obtain reasonably rare Soul music 45s when tonnes of them were being carried off to The UK.

I am a Canadian/American (also Dutch), who grew up partly in Winnipeg, Manitoba, partly in Chicago and lived in Los Angeles for late high school and University. In Chicago, my uncle and father had two grocery stores on The South Side. I lived in South Chicago. I had always liked Black music. My father liked Jazz and City Blues. He had a lot of 78s. I already liked US Black music as a young child, as the radio music in Western Canada was hicky (seemingly uninspired) Country and Western music. We used to visit family in Chicago in summers and winter and spring vacations. My family always had stores in The Ghetto (South Side). I used to hang out there. I listened to Blues, R&B, Gospel (despite being Jewish) and Jazz. I started buying records at 7 years old. My parents took me to the thrift shops, where I bought '50s R&B and Blues records for 10¢ apiece. (naturally, I was getting more of the good stuff in Chicago than in Winnipeg). I also went to record shops and bought from their bargain bins. We moved, permanently, to Chicago in 1959. I started scarfing up loads of records then. I worked in my fathers store and most of my friends were Southsiders. When I started driving a car in 1963, I started driving to Detroit to look through record shops and thrift and junk stores one Saturday each month. I also had regular routes in Chicagoland, and traveled to Milwaukee, Indianapolis, St. Louis and Des Moines. In the late '60s, I took several trips across USA and Canada buying records.

Yes, I KNEW what I was buying -WHEN I could play the records at the record shops. At the thrift shops, I looked for R&B indie labels, producers, arrangers, songwriters and music publishing companies who had work I had liked in previous experience. I have a photographic memory for large amounts of data, and so, could remember thousands of names and sounds of songs (a talent that seems to be VERY prevalent in The Northern scene among the big collectors and dealers (not so?).

Naturally, I didn't know that "Naughty Boy" or other records that I bought in the 1960s would eventually become bid up in price to ridiculous heights by dance club disc jockeys and dancers in the 1970s and 1980s (I'm not Nostradamus). I bought Boogie Woogie/R&B/jump Blues/DooWop/Blues/Jazz/Gospel music in the 1950s and '60s because I liked it, and added Soul in the 1960s because I liked that. I didn't buy any records with music I didn't like on speculation. I bought precious few duplicates, mainly to upgrade condition, or a couple copies that came very cheaply, to trade for records I can't find on my own. I love Motown and Chicago Soul best 1959-1964 best (also 1965-67). I like R&B from the '40s-'50s. I like group records from '53-'54 best from that genre. I don't like funk. I stopped listening to the radio in 1966. I ALWAYS listened to the Black (Race music) radio stations. I have almost no idea of Caucasian "pop" music. I can count the number of Beatles and Rolling Stones songtitles I know on two hands and one hand, respectively. I couldn't tell you two songtitles of songs by Paul Anka or any of the pop stars. If someone were to point a gun to my head and kill me if I couldn't come up with a title, I'd have to recall a day of flipping through 45s in my head, bring up the image of the record, and, subsequently "read" what was on the label (which IS stored in my memory), but, to which, I had never before paid attention. For most of the records in my collection, I can think back and "see" myself picking up the record (e.g. remember where and roughly when I bought it). Again, I have noticed this "peculiar" talent in many record collectors. It's probably a requisite for searching through millions of records and generally not having enough time to look through all that one would like to see.

In 1972, I started living part-time in Holland (full time from 1987-1995-and part time again from then even until now). I used to come to England on short trips. In the late 1970s and '80s, I used to visit friends in Lancashire. I used to visit John Anderson (King's Lynn) and buy some records, and John Manship, as well. Rod Shard and Dave Withers and Tim Ashibende got records off me. I also know John Marriott. I traded NS valuable records for rare Detroit Soul 45s that I had never seen nor had an opportunity to buy at a price I could afford.

I did most of my record searching between 1953, and 1972 (when I started working for The UN in Africa, The Middle East and the Far East for much of the year, and headquartering myself for a few months also in Holland). I did still live in LA some, but only looked for records when Rod Shard or Dave Withers came to visit me. The thrift and junk stores and record shops' stock had "dried up" (Northern Soul buyers from UK had the ins to see the record shop and distributor stock first, and the cash to buy a lot more). So, it was pretty tough for North Americans to compete for it.

In the Early 1970s Motown moved out to L.A. As a big Motown collector and fan (in the early '60s) I had visited their offices in Detroit, asking the secretaries if they had any DJ copies I could have. After they came to L.A. I starting getting friendly with some of their staff. They liked my taste in music. I ended up doing consulting work on some of their projects for release of previously unissued cuts. The "From The Vaults" project was originally planned for 5 LPs as a test, with the option for 5 more. It ended up as only one single album on Natural Resources budget label. We worked on that for several years, listening to a great number of cuts from the vaults (tapes and acetates). MANY of those acetates we had in our possession have been sold (and a lot ended up in UK). I "discovered" many of the unissued cuts that were booted in UK and played on the Northern scene (way too many to list) ("Suspicion", etc.) We had "Do I Love You(Indeed I Do)" by Frank Wilson, The Andantes, etc. and virtually all the Motown releases in Tom DePierro's office. I think that Simon Soussan got the Frank Wilson (and a few others). I won't discuss how he got them, because I don't know. (I was not party to any of the thievery from Motown). A fair amount of the research we did was also used to put together the other stray LPs with previously unissued material, and also the unreleased cuts that ended up on The 25th Anniversary of Motown albums.

Most of the unreleased material we screened has now been issued on CDs by the various companies. But, there are still a few nice ones that are yet to come (Linda Griner, Edward Earling, Shorty Long, The Five Quails, and much great Gospel music by The Sons of Zion and The Pronouns). Something for which to look forward.

In 1980 I moved with Tom DePierro and a few others that had worked at Motown, to Airwave/Altair Records (as a part owner). I was with them until 1984. But, I was in Holland and The Third World much of that time.

Currently, I do consulting work with Ady Croasdell and, I hope, others at Ace/Kent Records, on "oldies" CD projects like "Dave Hamilton's Dancers" and "J & S Records(Zell Sanders)", providing label scans and records to record if needed, and information about record companies and personnel (if needed).

I write and draw Disney Comic book stories and magazine covers for Dutch, Danish and German Disney Publications (since 1984), so I have little time to deal with music these days.

So, Steve L. We WERE even. I didn't know who YOU are, and what YOUR background is.

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Guest Dante

'Nuff Said.

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Great story Robb :thumbsup:

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Thanx for that Robb!! ..really interesting read :thumbsup: I closed my eyes and you had me right there beside you :hatsoff2:

Edited by Steve Lane

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Why is this crazy? I think it's more "crazy" that '60s and '70s American Soul music became a "scene" (phenomenon) in which the prices of individual 45 RPM records accelerated to outlandish heights (making it almost impossible for us North American soul fans to obtain reasonably rare Soul music 45s when tonnes of them were being carried off to The UK.

So, Steve L. We WERE even. I didn't know who YOU are, and what YOUR background is.

I'm not sure what the capitals are all about, you seem to have taken offence to my questions - I'm not sure why?

Thanks for the reply though it all makes sense now. I was looking at the situation from the perspective of the UK soul scene ie where people started travelling to the US in the early 70s to find records. 1967 seemed unusually early but your post makes this clear now.

Fascinating story, any other input along similar lines would be appreciated by me :thumbsup:

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No offence intended. I see that you had thought I was a Brit in America searching for Soul records "too early".

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Why is this crazy? I think it's more "crazy" that '60s and '70s American Soul music became a "scene" (phenomenon) in which the prices of individual 45 RPM records accelerated to outlandish heights (making it almost impossible for us North American soul fans to obtain reasonably rare Soul music 45s when tonnes of them were being carried off to The UK.

I am a Canadian/American (also Dutch), who grew up partly in Winnipeg, Manitoba, partly in Chicago and lived in Los Angeles for late high school and University. In Chicago, my uncle and father had two grocery stores on The South Side. I lived in South Chicago. I had always liked Black music. My father liked Jazz and City Blues. He had a lot of 78s. I already liked US Black music as a young child, as the radio music in Western Canada was hicky (seemingly uninspired) Country and Western music. We used to visit family in Chicago in summers and winter and spring vacations. My family always had stores in The Ghetto (South Side). I used to hang out there. I listened to Blues, R&B, Gospel (despite being Jewish) and Jazz. I started buying records at 7 years old. My parents took me to the thrift shops, where I bought '50s R&B and Blues records for 10¢ apiece. (naturally, I was getting more of the good stuff in Chicago than in Winnipeg). I also went to record shops and bought from their bargain bins. We moved, permanently, to Chicago in 1959. I started scarfing up loads of records then. I worked in my fathers store and most of my friends were Southsiders. When I started driving a car in 1963, I started driving to Detroit to look through record shops and thrift and junk stores one Saturday each month. I also had regular routes in Chicagoland, and traveled to Milwaukee, Indianapolis, St. Louis and Des Moines. In the late '60s, I took several trips across USA and Canada buying records.

Yes, I KNEW what I was buying -WHEN I could play the records at the record shops. At the thrift shops, I looked for R&B indie labels, producers, arrangers, songwriters and music publishing companies who had work I had liked in previous experience. I have a photographic memory for large amounts of data, and so, could remember thousands of names and sounds of songs (a talent that seems to be VERY prevalent in The Northern scene among the big collectors and dealers (not so?).

Naturally, I didn't know that "Naughty Boy" or other records that I bought in the 1960s would eventually become bid up in price to ridiculous heights by dance club disc jockeys and dancers in the 1970s and 1980s (I'm not Nostradamus). I bought Boogie Woogie/R&B/jump Blues/DooWop/Blues/Jazz/Gospel music in the 1950s and '60s because I liked it, and added Soul in the 1960s because I liked that. I didn't buy any records with music I didn't like on speculation. I bought precious few duplicates, mainly to upgrade condition, or a couple copies that came very cheaply, to trade for records I can't find on my own. I love Motown and Chicago Soul best 1959-1964 best (also 1965-67). I like R&B from the '40s-'50s. I like group records from '53-'54 best from that genre. I don't like funk. I stopped listening to the radio in 1966. I ALWAYS listened to the Black (Race music) radio stations. I have almost no idea of Caucasian "pop" music. I can count the number of Beatles and Rolling Stones songtitles I know on two hands and one hand, respectively. I couldn't tell you two songtitles of songs by Paul Anka or any of the pop stars. If someone were to point a gun to my head and kill me if I couldn't come up with a title, I'd have to recall a day of flipping through 45s in my head, bring up the image of the record, and, subsequently "read" what was on the label (which IS stored in my memory), but, to which, I had never before paid attention. For most of the records in my collection, I can think back and "see" myself picking up the record (e.g. remember where and roughly when I bought it). Again, I have noticed this "peculiar" talent in many record collectors. It's probably a requisite for searching through millions of records and generally not having enough time to look through all that one would like to see.

In 1972, I started living part-time in Holland (full time from 1987-1995-and part time again from then even until now). I used to come to England on short trips. In the late 1970s and '80s, I used to visit friends in Lancashire. I used to visit John Anderson (King's Lynn) and buy some records, and John Manship, as well. Rod Shard and Dave Withers and Tim Ashibende got records off me. I also know John Marriott. I traded NS valuable records for rare Detroit Soul 45s that I had never seen nor had an opportunity to buy at a price I could afford.

I did most of my record searching between 1953, and 1972 (when I started working for The UN in Africa, The Middle East and the Far East for much of the year, and headquartering myself for a few months also in Holland). I did still live in LA some, but only looked for records when Rod Shard or Dave Withers came to visit me. The thrift and junk stores and record shops' stock had "dried up" (Northern Soul buyers from UK had the ins to see the record shop and distributor stock first, and the cash to buy a lot more). So, it was pretty tough for North Americans to compete for it.

In the Early 1970s Motown moved out to L.A. As a big Motown collector and fan (in the early '60s) I had visited their offices in Detroit, asking the secretaries if they had any DJ copies I could have. After they came to L.A. I starting getting friendly with some of their staff. They liked my taste in music. I ended up doing consulting work on some of their projects for release of previously unissued cuts. The "From The Vaults" project was originally planned for 5 LPs as a test, with the option for 5 more. It ended up as only one single album on Natural Resources budget label. We worked on that for several years, listening to a great number of cuts from the vaults (tapes and acetates). MANY of those acetates we had in our possession have been sold (and a lot ended up in UK). I "discovered" many of the unissued cuts that were booted in UK and played on the Northern scene (way too many to list) ("Suspicion", etc.) We had "Do I Love You(Indeed I Do)" by Frank Wilson, The Andantes, etc. and virtually all the Motown releases in Tom DePierro's office. I think that Simon Soussan got the Frank Wilson (and a few others). I won't discuss how he got them, because I don't know. (I was not party to any of the thievery from Motown). A fair amount of the research we did was also used to put together the other stray LPs with previously unissued material, and also the unreleased cuts that ended up on The 25th Anniversary of Motown albums.

Most of the unreleased material we screened has now been issued on CDs by the various companies. But, there are still a few nice ones that are yet to come (Linda Griner, Edward Earling, Shorty Long, The Five Quails, and much great Gospel music by The Sons of Zion and The Pronouns). Something for which to look forward.

In 1980 I moved with Tom DePierro and a few others that had worked at Motown, to Airwave/Altair Records (as a part owner). I was with them until 1984. But, I was in Holland and The Third World much of that time.

Currently, I do consulting work with Ady Croasdell and, I hope, others at Ace/Kent Records, on "oldies" CD projects like "Dave Hamilton's Dancers" and "J & S Records(Zell Sanders)", providing label scans and records to record if needed, and information about record companies and personnel (if needed).

I write and draw Disney Comic book stories and magazine covers for Dutch, Danish and German Disney Publications (since 1984), so I have little time to deal with music these days.

So, Steve L. We WERE even. I didn't know who YOU are, and what YOUR background is.

Thanks for being so open Robb, as most keep that stuff to themselves (guilty!).

To get some kind of US perspective is great as for most of us over here still have this idea of this music being released into a kind of vacuum, laving dormant until being found by us.

So please more stories..what was the promotion like in record stores like, were the records just put out, or was there a concerted strategy?

Regards,

Tony

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Great stuff Rob, i had heard about you in the 80,s but you,ve filled in a lot of history there , collecting music stateside in the 60,s must have been a great experience for you , I started buying soul 45,s in the mid 60,s in the early 70,s in the UK it was the heyday of finding what we term Northern Soul at bargain prices hell of a lot of great music was shipped over to the UK in the 70,s even in my small home town of Leigh we had around 5 shops where you could find black music from small indie labels , Manchester just down the road from me had a couple of great places to find rare 45,s in the 70,s ...80,s Global records where Richard Searling use to work and later Robinsons where i found some great bargains and not forgetting your buddy Rod Shard market stall which was always a hive of activity whenever he or Dave Withers got back from the states..

Regards Ian Cunliffe

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Great stuff Rob, i had heard about you in the 80,s but you,ve filled in a lot of history there , collecting music stateside in the 60,s must have been a great experience for you , I started buying soul 45,s in the mid 60,s in the early 70,s in the UK it was the heyday of finding what we term Northern Soul at bargain prices hell of a lot of great music was shipped over to the UK in the 70,s even in my small home town of Leigh we had around 5 shops where you could find black music from small indie labels , Manchester just down the road from me had a couple of great places to find rare 45,s in the 70,s ...80,s Global records where Richard Searling use to work and later Robinsons where i found some great bargains and not forgetting your buddy Rod Shard market stall which was always a hive of activity whenever he or Dave Withers got back from the states..

Regards Ian Cunliffe

I bought some nice records at Robinson's, myself. In 1955, if someone had told me I'd need to go to England in the 1980s to find '60s Black American music, I'd have told him he was insane.

Edited by RobbK

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Thanks for being so open Robb, as most keep that stuff to themselves (guilty!).

To get some kind of US perspective is great as for most of us over here still have this idea of this music being released into a kind of vacuum, laving dormant until being found by us.

So please more stories..what was the promotion like in record stores like, were the records just put out, or was there a concerted strategy?

Regards,

Tony

Yep, it would be nice to hear more from the place where most were played first after all. As I am sure the ''vacuum'' had record players at the local party, radio station, living room and so on!!!! The funny thing is if you buy ''northern records'' the ''slow side'' is often hammered to death !!!

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I bought some nice records at Robinson's, myself. In 1955, if someone had told me I'd need to go to England in the 1980s to find '60s Black American music, I'd have told him he was insane.

Hi rob, did you dance or listen to rare soul records just at home or did ya go to partys of some sort to enjoy the sounds????

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Who is or was Soul Spin records? :g:

You'd think the site would at least use a scan of the original issue :rolleyes:

Err that was me :shades:

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Steve i thought you had taste mate :ohmy:

Ted,

sure I heard Guy first play this at stafford in 84.Great dancer but not a classic,but still had all

the credentials to be a Wigan monster.

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Hi rob, did you dance or listen to rare soul records just at home or did ya go to partys of some sort to enjoy the sounds????

In High School and during university years I went to parties. Almost every Saturday night someone had a party. They'd usually have most of the Top 30 R&B (WVON) chart 45s (brought by 6-7 people). At first, in high school, I'd bring some of my records, but stopped, because sometimes they got scratched, or there would be arguments over whose records belonged to whom. I never DJed. I was a pretty poor dancer, but, I guess about average for a "White guy". Most of my friends were African Americans. They tried to teach me all the new dance steps. But I just didn't have the rhythm. They were all such great dancers, I was sort of intimidated by the comparison. So, basically I just sort of girated around in my own, unique style (good thing no doctors were around-they'd have hauled me into hospital, thinking I was having epileptical fits!)

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To get some kind of US perspective is great as for most of us over here still have this idea of this music being released into a kind of vacuum, laving dormant until being found by us.

So please more stories..what was the promotion like in record stores like, were the records just put out, or was there a concerted strategy?

Regards,

Tony

Well, many of you who've been in US and Canadian record shops, looking for Soul records, know how the shops were in the '70s. They were much the same in the '50s and '60s. They usually had tables all over the main floor of the shop, with deep boxes in them, to hold vertically stacked LPs. They usually had a long counter where 2-4 people could stand helping customers, and behind that was a wall of record shelving, with vertical compartments for 45s and 78s, in the 1950s, and just 45s, in the 1960s. Often, shops would reserve 30 compartments for their city's main R&B radio station's Top 30 hits, changing the order each week.

The single records were rarely out where customers could look them over. That only happened when the store would have special sales. They always had cheap bins for records that were slow-moving (5-4-3-2 for $1.00). Those you could look through. Once in a while they'd sell off a few thousand 45s, cheaply. Then, they'd place them in horizontal stacks of 50-100 atop a few selected flat (non-boxed) tables.

The stores had record players to listen to LPs, and you could play 45s on those as well. Sometimes they were just on wall counters, but the fancy ones would have one or two listening booths. Sometimes record companies had their own promotion posters or sales displays (Chess, Atlantic, VJ, King,Modern, Blue Note), where they promoted their companies current releases. Those would usually be near one end or the other of the sales counter. I remember quite a few different Chess and VJ displays.

Once in a while artists would make appearances at the bigger, more well-known record shops to promote their new record. They autographed copies of their record that people would buy at the store. I remember seeing adverts for many personal appearances for local artists. In the '50s, these appearances were usually connected with a local radio station, and a DJ would MC the appearance, with the artist singing. Sometimes this was on live radio, other times it was taped.

Edited by RobbK

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Bump up, as I answered someone's question, but I post in the middle of your night, and by your morning, many new posts bury mine.

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I listened to it again, and it sounds tinny. The mixing quality is poor. But, as stated above, the sax solo is fantastic. Anyone know who played it?

Anyone know who Cyril D. Roberts was? I can't remember if I've seen his name on any other L.A. '60s Soul records. He produced and arranged it. I think he may have been a low-level local band leader.

He was a songwriter and producer. Some on here will be familiar with another one he wrote, Ernie Washington - Lonesome Shack

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On 24/03/2020 at 13:25, daimon said:

I have clean copy.please let me know.

How much do you want? 

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On 10/08/2011 at 04:23, viphitman said:

 

 

Yep, it would be nice to hear more from the place where most were played first after all. As I am sure the ''vacuum'' had record players at the local party, radio station, living room and so on!!!! The funny thing is if you buy ''northern records'' the ''slow side'' is often hammered to death !!!

There is a reason for that.  The ballad side was the "A" side from the '40s through most of the '50s.  The harmony groups specialised in love song ballads(the serious stuff); and, at first, the faster (jump blues sides were considered "novelty" (frivolous-less important).  The battle of the bands always featured ballads until the very late '50s, because they were the top-notch performances which the groups practised much, much more.  Of course, the ballads are better for slow dancing, which was a lot better for couples who wanted to touch each other (which was what sex-starved teens wanted most to do).  In the 1960s it started being about half and half fast and slow as the groups started singing fast sweet songs, and novelty songs died out except for The Olympics and Contours, and fast dance songs written to do the new fast dances to.  In the late '60s the fast sides started taking over for many groups, but there were still ballad singers who may have had 2 slow sides, but even when they sang fast songs, the slow side was usually the "A" side.

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On 19/08/2011 at 14:21, Simon T said:

 

 

He was a songwriter and producer. Some on here will be familiar with another one he wrote, Ernie Washington - Lonesome Shack

I must have been having a "senior moment" when I asked that question.  I now remember seeing several small and tiny L.A. indie labels with Cyril Roberts' name as a songwriter or producer on records from the early and mid 1960s. Unfortunately, I can't remember the specific labels or groups or singers.

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Posted (edited)

Duplicate post.

Edited by Robbk

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I have always loved this record since I first heard Guy spin it at Stafford in April 1985 at the second anniversary which was the first time I had been to Stafford in quite a long time due to work commitments and buying my first house which took all of my time and money. I remember thinking at the time I must get along to this event more often.I loved the whole 60s newies thing that went on at Stafford and elsewhere at the time and made a point of going to Stafford at least once a month till it ended in early in 1986.

 

 

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