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Dj-ing & The Ns Scene


Barry

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Has there a new breed of dj come around these days?

The ones I grew up with were collectors, that played their collection, yet I have read so many posts about selling stuff cos it didn't floor-pack and wanting the latest in demander.....and this hot-box thing!?

I know there are bound to be lads that are old skool but how prevelant is this mentality of buying and selling to make DJ status.

Is it what it's all about?

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was speaking to a mate about Djs and all that, he reckoned the best are normally from outside the Uk, they have no fear, play anything thats good no matter how much its worth and all that and mix it up more..

I'd have to agree, allot of djs in the Uk can be very predictable..

Mal.C

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Guest James Trouble

Has there a new breed of dj come around these days?

The ones I grew up with were collectors, that played their collection, yet I have read so many posts about selling stuff cos it didn't floor-pack and wanting the latest in demander.....and this hot-box thing!?

I know there are bound to be lads that are old skool but how prevelant is this mentality of buying and selling to make DJ status.

Is it what it's all about?

I think it's probably always been about. But as prices have shot up the mentality has had to change. As a collector you either have to slow down your buying of new tunes, or buy less rare tunes.

As a DJ you either have to accept that you may have to trade away records to get new things in to keep your set interesting or be prepared for dancers not being happy because you never change your set and at that point you should accept you are not up to the job and step aside. The DJs job is to entertain, after all?!

This is a sympton of high prices which is even more of a probelm for a new generation who have not built a collection since the 70s and 80s.

I'm not sure I've read anywhere people saying they want to sell stuff to get in the latest indemander? Although I'm pretty sure this happens, people wanting indemanders, otherwise they wouldn't be indemanders, woudl they?

Shouldn't this be on the other thread?

Edited by James Trouble
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As a DJ

That's the statement I struggle with.

I don't see eye to eye with the idea that you could in truth sell a record that you like (as if you would) to fund something that will keep you in the public eye, hence my statement 'Is that what it's all about?'

Now I know that without the one-upmanship angle there are a thousand records I wouldn't know and love, so I can't complain as a listener, and I know to some extent that I'm playing devils advocate here. I alsounderstand that soulies aren't like your common or garden mobile jock.....but my computer, still, says "No!"

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Some of this is about both how and where you want to DJ. I love people coming up and giving positive feedback on a set, as I'm sure all DJ's do. I much prefer it when people I respect, be they other DJ's, collectors or dancers say 'WOW that's fantastic who is it by?'. I have and will continue to DJ at venues where they only want to hear what they know there are too few venues IMO where DJ's play unknown / obscure / rarely played items but even where these exist they can be poorly supported.

Mind you the week before last the 'DJ' following me at an oldies do did comment on my last record saying ' I Like this one what is it ' after I said 'F*** off stop taking the piss' it appeared he was serious. I also had a similar comment on a different record last time I DJ'd the same venue but from a punter not a 'DJ'.

The two records in question:

Bernie Williams - Ever Again and

Carrol and Gerri - How Can I Ever Find A Way.

:unsure:mellow.gif:thumbsup:mellow.gifmellow.gifmellow.gifmellow.gif

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Guest Simon

Mind you the week before last the 'DJ' following me at an oldies do did comment on my last record saying ' I Like this one what is it ' after I said 'F*** off stop taking the piss' it appeared he was serious. I also had a similar comment on a different record last time I DJ'd the same venue but from a punter not a 'DJ'.

This doesn't surprise me at all, some people start djing nowadays three weeks after they've been on the scene.

The punter remark is no surprise either, it was probably one of the KFC converts!

Simon :unsure:

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This doesn't surprise me at all, some people start djing nowadays three weeks after they've been on the scene.

The punter remark is no surprise either, it was probably one of the KFC converts!

Simon :unsure:

The punter has been on the scene for a lot of years and has heard me play the flip 'Heartache looks good' elsewhere. The 'DJ' I'd never seen before and I think every record in his box, by the look of the sleeves, came from Glen Brierly. Not sure how hot the box was though wicked.gif

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was speaking to a mate about Djs and all that, he reckoned the best are normally from outside the Uk, they have no fear, play anything thats good no matter how much its worth and all that and mix it up more..

I'd have to agree, allot of djs in the Uk can be very predictable..

Mal.C

:unsure: So true..But much more going on here..Some djs overseas only play a few time a year if that,here its 3 times every weekend for some ,easy to get stuck with the same play box...

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Guest Simon

The punter has been on the scene for a lot of years and has heard me play the flip 'Heartache looks good' elsewhere.

That's very interesting because didn't the other side used to get played more, thought it was only recently that OYHLG had started getting a bit more turntable action?

Simon

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Guest upsetterfc

This doesn't surprise me at all, some people start djing nowadays three weeks after they've been on the scene.

Simon :unsure:

Anyone can become a DJ in only 4 months...

I'm such a luddite when it comes to spinning that I still refer to CDs as "Tools of Satan". So I'm waiting for the day someone asks me if they can spin at my night with laptop/iPod in hand. No one is going to ruin my night with crappy MP3 files that sound like a truck rolled over them on the sound system!

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That's very interesting because didn't the other side used to get played more, thought it was only recently that OYHLG had started getting a bit more turntable action?

Simon

Well Simon when I say a lot of years I meant 7 or 8 to my certain knowledge. I always prefered 'Heartaches' though I did originally buy it for 'How'.

I only played it because I thought everyone in the room would know it just shows I guess even tunes some of us think of as weary or played out could be hot boxers to some others. :unsure:

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Anyone can become a DJ in only 4 months...

I'm such a luddite when it comes to spinning that I still refer to CDs as "Tools of Satan". So I'm waiting for the day someone asks me if they can spin at my night with laptop/iPod in hand. No one is going to ruin my night with crappy MP3 files that sound like a truck rolled over them on the sound system!

Playing off a laptop has been done on the scene at a well known but now defunct weekender. :unsure:

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That's the statement I struggle with.

I don't see eye to eye with the idea that you could in truth sell a record that you like (as if you would) to fund something that will keep you in the public eye, hence my statement 'Is that what it's all about?'

Now I know that without the one-upmanship angle there are a thousand records I wouldn't know and love, so I can't complain as a listener, and I know to some extent that I'm playing devils advocate here. I alsounderstand that soulies aren't like your common or garden mobile jock.....but my computer, still, says "No!"

I appreciate the 'hot box' DJs, who dont keep every record they ever like, but sell to buy top rare stuff, because that obsession with finding and playing the latest big thing often leads to more interesting sets that really reflect current tastes and discoveries rather than collectors just playing tunes they like. But I've heard collectors who manage to do that too, maybe they've just got more money.

My problem with the 'hot box' method is that you end up with a box of 30-50 records that are not your favourite records or even the best records, just 30-50 records that are impressive to the scene at some point, and that's all your collection will ever be.

Personally, I'd like to die with a collection of as many as possible of what i think are the best records ever made, whether they're worth £10 or £1000.

But each to their own in that respect, when i hear a half hour or hour set, I dont care that the DJs got the entire run of 5 soul labels or whatever, I just want to hear a half hour of great, fresh tunes, however they manage that, good on em. If they don't they're not a good DJ, however big their collection is.

Edited by mik parry
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Guest Simon

Well Simon when I say a lot of years I meant 7 or 8 to my certain knowledge. I always prefered 'Heartaches' though I did originally buy it for 'How'.

I only played it because I thought everyone in the room would know it just shows I guess even tunes some of us think of as weary or played out could be hot boxers to some others. :unsure:

Don't think i've heard 'How' played out too many times in the last 10 years, i only knew it because someone kindly gave me a tape with it on a few years back.

Simon

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That's the statement I struggle with.

I don't see eye to eye with the idea that you could in truth sell a record that you like (as if you would) to fund something that will keep you in the public eye, hence my statement 'Is that what it's all about?'

Now I know that without the one-upmanship angle there are a thousand records I wouldn't know and love, so I can't complain as a listener, and I know to some extent that I'm playing devils advocate here. I alsounderstand that soulies aren't like your common or garden mobile jock.....but my computer, still, says "No!"

On the NS scene, everyone is a DJ.. :unsure:

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:unsure: So true..But much more going on here..Some djs overseas only play a few time a year if that,here its 3 times every weekend for some ,easy to get stuck with the same play box...

Yeah there is that... what the hell I never go out much these days so what the F*** do I know... Think like Mik I'll die with as many great soul sounds as possible.. either that or my son sam will get them as frizbies!! laughs

what track are you all speaking about when you say heartaches, ittle charles?

Mal.C.

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I appreciate the 'hot box' DJs, who dont keep every record they ever like, but sell to buy top rare stuff, because that obsession with finding and playing the latest big thing often leads to more interesting sets that really reflect current tastes and discoveries rather than collectors just playing tunes they like. But I've heard collectors who manage to do that too, maybe they've just got more money.

My problem with the 'hot box' method is that you end up with a box of 30-50 records that are not your favourite records or even the best records, just 30-50 records that are impressive to the scene at some point, and that's all your collection will ever be.

Personally, I'd like to die with a collection of as many as possible of what i think are the best records ever made, whether they're worth £10 or £1000.

But each to their own in that respect, when i hear a half hour or hour set, I dont care that the DJs got the entire run of 5 soul labels or whatever, I just want to hear a half hour of great, fresh tunes, however they manage that, good on em. If they don't they're not a good DJ, however big their collection is.

Well said :unsure:

I've heard many a DJ with a so called hot box who couldn't put a set together to save their life. The northern scene isn't just about £1000 rarities. I'd sooner here a DJ who cares about the music enough to want to own and cherish the record not own so he can have bragging rights or feed an ego.

I've read some crap in my time but this and the hot box topic contains some of the best crap

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I appreciate the 'hot box' DJs, who dont keep every record they ever like, but sell to buy top rare stuff, because that obsession with finding and playing the latest big thing often leads to more interesting sets that really reflect current tastes and discoveries rather than collectors just playing tunes they like. But I've heard collectors who manage to do that too, maybe they've just got more money.

My problem with the 'hot box' method is that you end up with a box of 30-50 records that are not your favourite records or even the best records, just 30-50 records that are impressive to the scene at some point, and that's all your collection will ever be.

Personally, I'd like to die with a collection of as many as possible of what i think are the best records ever made, whether they're worth £10 or £1000.

But each to their own in that respect, when i hear a half hour or hour set, I dont care that the DJs got the entire run of 5 soul labels or whatever, I just want to hear a half hour of great, fresh tunes, however they manage that, good on em. If they don't they're not a good DJ, however big their collection is.

Well said :unsure:

I've heard many a DJ with a so called hot box who couldn't put a set together to save their life. The northern scene isn't just about £1000 rarities. I'd sooner here a DJ who cares about the music enough to want to own and cherish the record not own so he can have bragging rights or feed an ego.

I've read some crap in my time but this and the hot box topic contains some of the best crap

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Guest James Trouble

That's the statement I struggle with.

I don't see eye to eye with the idea that you could in truth sell a record that you like (as if you would) to fund something that will keep you in the public eye, hence my statement 'Is that what it's all about?'

Now I know that without the one-upmanship angle there are a thousand records I wouldn't know and love, so I can't complain as a listener, and I know to some extent that I'm playing devils advocate here. I alsounderstand that soulies aren't like your common or garden mobile jock.....but my computer, still, says "No!"

Barry, I wonder what you make of DJs who play records out of their sales box? I wonder what you think their motive is for doing that? The ones who slip out records from their sale box on the way to the decks, then slip them back in when they've finished?

Funny old game innit?! laugh.gif

We all love it though, which can't be bad :unsure:

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Records don't have to cost 100' and 100's, nor do you have to trade 'em in every few months or whatever just to keep the dancers happy and your set fresh.

JT says a dj isn't up to it if he doesn't adhere to this practise, well I say a Dj isn't up to it if he has to do it this way, and again this isn't aimed at you JT as I know you are up to it. If you have the money anyone can go out and buy indemander and rarity after rarity, no thought or imaginmation is needed to do this. I'd sooner hear a Dj who uses their knowledge and puts some thought and imagination in to his or her set and not their wallet.

I've heard any a Dj with so called hot boxes who have doen some awful sets.

Edited by chalky
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Well said :unsure:

I've heard many a DJ with a so called hot box who couldn't put a set together to save their life. The northern scene isn't just about £1000 rarities. I'd sooner here a DJ who cares about the music enough to want to own and cherish the record not own so he can have bragging rights or feed an ego.

I've read some crap in my time but this and the hot box topic contains some of the best crap

I'm with you on this one Chalky , where the f 'in hell did ''hot box '' come from. Also the point was raised earlier in the thread that the best DJ'S are not for the UK , there are two venues as I know of that encourage DJ'S to play anything THE ATTIC and THE BENTINCK (back room)

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Guest Bearsy

I really dont understand the reasoning of hotbox DJs, Is that DJ only trying to play what he thinks the punters want because if he is he surely cant be feeling the music he is playing,

For me i like to see a DJ that plays from the heart and feels what he plays when he puts a set together and takes each spin one at a time and not sorted out beforehand indoors earlier,

just my opinion

Bearsy

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i wasn't going to contribute as i'm not a dj anymore apart from very rarely, and even more rarely on the northern scene (like once every 10 years! ) so i'm (thankfully) not directly affected by this, but what the hell :unsure:

all this talk of people having to sell records to buy more expensive ones is rubbish. there are thousands of 60's and 70's records out there and if someone can't put a set together of great 60's and 70's soul at a generally low premium per record has a complete lack of imagination and ideas. the easy route is to 'upgrade' to monied records and compete with the people who already have them over time, but you're just being a wannabee and trying to get recognition by association. go out in the field and get your head in some record boxes, listen to music and make a decision yourself on what to play and it won't cost you a fortune. what makes a 'dj' think that all their audience want to hear are expensive oldies and expensive in-demanders rather than simply top quality soul music. wji've only ever met one person who actually left the dancefloor as he called a record 'cheap shit' and wouldn't dance to anything less than £100; but then again he really was a bit of an idiot and the other 200 people in the room carried on dancing.

the bottom line is half of this 'upgrading' stuff is all about an ego trip and has to do with wanting everybody to luuurve you by making them dance.

apart from that i'm not bothered tongue.gif

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Guest James Trouble

Well said :unsure:

I've heard many a DJ with a so called hot box who couldn't put a set together to save their life. The northern scene isn't just about £1000 rarities. I'd sooner here a DJ who cares about the music enough to want to own and cherish the record not own so he can have bragging rights or feed an ego.

I've read some crap in my time but this and the hot box topic contains some of the best crap

What part of it is crap Chalky?

At no point have I said "YOU HAVE TO", far from it. But I have said to maintain an interesting DJ set that is up there with the best it is going to be required to move records on if you don't have a bottemless pit of cash to get new things in. If you are not prepared to keep your set interesting you are not being an interesting DJ. This is common sense isn't it? Is that so shocking?

Edited by James Trouble
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Guest James Trouble

I really dont understand the reasoning of hotbox DJs, Is that DJ only trying to play what he thinks the punters want because if he is he surely cant be feeling the music he is playing,

For me i like to see a DJ that plays from the heart and feels what he plays when he puts a set together and takes each spin one at a time and not sorted out beforehand indoors earlier,

just my opinion

Bearsy

No, far from it. Where has this come from? It's about keeping DJ sets interesting, which alot of DJs don't do IMO. It's very hard to get in new tunes because of the very high prices, so unless you don't have a bottomless pit of cash a DJ may need to sell on tired or used records to bring in something fresh and exciting, keeping the play box hot.

Is this such a shocking concept?

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But how many records does it take to keep a northern box fresh? , Surely theres hardly any records that are fresh, and people have to pad out with intelligent underplayed oldies in Northern sets or diversify like Butch with other genres .( mix it up)

How many really fresh hot 60's records do you get say in 3 months or even a year :unsure:

ps. to play underplayed oldies I think you need some sort of collection

Edited by Simon M
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Guest Bearsy

No, far from it. Where has this come from? It's about keeping DJ sets interesting, which alot of DJs don't do IMO. It's very hard to get in new tunes because of the very high prices, so unless you don't have a bottomless pit of cash a DJ may need to sell on tired or used records to bring in something fresh and exciting, keeping the play box hot.

Is this such a shocking concept?

Sorry JT i think i didnt explain myself properly there,

A top DJ should have a fairly sizeable collection which in turn should be able to be big enough for a very varied set and not to play the same 25 or so everytime said DJ does play a set,

I agree with selling tunes you no longer are mad about anymore and to use the funds to buy new and long wanted tunes.

Its the hotbox thing i dont understand , im not taking the pee but is it something like this, have £100,000 of top indemand records (approx 100) and play a few sets at a few venues and then so it dont look like you are a few in demand tunes DJ you then swap with other hotbox DJs tunes of similar value and rotate your great but small collection ?, thats where i think that the DJ who might do this does not have the same feeling for the tunes as its just a tune he/she will swap for another in a little while, where another DJ who owns the tunes and loves it with all thier heart, at the end of the day it does always revolve around money does it not, some have shitloads of dosh some have to trade and wheel and deal,

How many DJs could take a 200 box with them and know that if all the other DJs failed to turn up then they could still keep the night flying with what they have with them.

ive read this back and i think i understand it :unsure:

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Guest James Trouble

Sorry JT i think i didnt explain myself properly there,

A top DJ should have a fairly sizeable collection which in turn should be able to be big enough for a very varied set and not to play the same 25 or so everytime said DJ does play a set,

I agree with selling tunes you no longer are mad about anymore and to use the funds to buy new and long wanted tunes.

Its the hotbox thing i dont understand , im not taking the pee but is it something like this, have £100,000 of top indemand records (approx 100) and play a few sets at a few venues and then so it dont look like you are a few in demand tunes DJ you then swap with other hotbox DJs tunes of similar value and rotate your great but small collection ?, thats where i think that the DJ who might do this does not have the same feeling for the tunes as its just a tune he/she will swap for another in a little while, where another DJ who owns the tunes and loves it with all thier heart, at the end of the day it does always revolve around money does it not, some have shitloads of dosh some have to trade and wheel and deal,

How many DJs could take a 200 box with them and know that if all the other DJs failed to turn up then they could still keep the night flying with what they have with them.

ive read this back and i think i understand it unsure.gif

NO! It's not about indemanders. It's not about anythign other than keeping a set interesting. Why would DJs want to be chasing the same tunes? f*** that! I've sold stuff like Elipsis, Hamilton Movement, Johney Praye, Jo Jama, Johney Howard, Joseph Webster (all the johney's and Jo's) blah blah blah as they were taking off becasue I'd already used them and used the money to get more interesting records in that other DJs were not hammering as well. But that's not to say other DJs should be doing that, it's just what I personally enjoy and IMO there's not much point anyone playing tunes like that once the Soul Sam's Mick H's, Butchs of the world are hammering them, personally I enjoy finding my own tunes and I don't mind letting things go once there are other DJs behind them.

It's simply about keeping a DJ set interesting and a way of getting around the fact that records as so bloody expensive to get hold of in terms of money AND time.

Edited by James Trouble
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Guest upsetterfc

But how many records does it take to keep a northern box fresh? , Surely theres hardly any records that are fresh, and people have to pad out with intelligent underplayed oldies in Northern sets or diversify like Butch with other genres .( mix it up)

How many really fresh hot 60's records do you get say in 3 months or even a year mellow.gif

ps. to play underplayed oldies I think you need some sort of collection

Keeping fresh while holding the crowd is an essential skill for anyone who spins and wants to make a name for themselves. Lack of money shouldn't be an excuse, it just means you either take more risks or work harder at finding tracks for your night.

If you're doing an hour guest slot figure about 18-23 records. If it's a six-hour night that's about 100 tracks. So you pull about 50 records for the hour or more if you want to play it safe. If you can't work under those constraints, then you don't belong behind the turntables.

For myself, I try to add at least 5-6 tracks I can play out a month. Not too hard with JA music for me. Can't really say the same for soul since it's always secondary when I dig.

Edited by upsetterfc
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Well said :unsure:

I've read some crap in my time but this and the hot box topic contains some of the best crap

Was toying with the idea of a long post on the "hot box" thread Chalky, but to concur with this statement will suffice :lol::thumbsup:

My pet hate when I'm in the queue at the record mongers, is the guy in front saying "Is there anything I can use on it?" ranting_1.gif I usually pipe up "maybe not, but there might be something you like on it?!!!."

To me it's about music I like.............if I can play a proportion of that music "out", then I'll DJ, if I can't I'd rather not do it! And I'm not good at letting tunes go.

Cheers,

Mark R

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Guest Bearsy

NO! It's not about indemanders. It's not about anythign other than keeping a set interesting. Why would DJs want to be chasing the same tunes? f*** that! I've sold stuff like Elipsis, Hamilton Movement, Johney Praye, Jo Jama, Johney Howard blah blah blah as they were taking off becasue I'd already used them and used the money to get more interesting records in that other DJs were not hammering as well. But that's not to say other DJs should be doing that, it's just what I personally enjoy.

It's simply about keeping a DJ set interesting and a way of getting around the fact that records as so bloody expensive to get hold of in terms of money AND time.

I must have misunderstood the whole hotbox thing then JT as i thought it was about some DJs (not all) just swapping with others to keep thier own sets different with the top tunes about, i know its not always about Indemanders but the DJs who bought the records off of you that you had brought to the forefront of the scene were you could say chasing and playing what you have broken already, I agree that the challenge should be to find stuff thats not been heard before or even forgotten if they are expensive or not shouldnt matter or should it, Im not kissing bottom but you have a great reputation for playing great sets and keeping it fresh but not every DJ is like yourself and thats where the problem (if it is a problem) of unfresh and predictable sets by DJs that is being highlighted time and again.

Sorry for having a different view on things but thats how i have seen it.

Bearsy

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Guest James Trouble

I must have misunderstood the whole hotbox thing then JT as i thought it was about some DJs (not all) just swapping with others to keep thier own sets different with the top tunes about, i know its not always about Indemanders but the DJs who bought the records off of you that you had brought to the forefront of the scene were you could say chasing and playing what you have broken already, I agree that the challenge should be to find stuff thats not been heard before or even forgotten if they are expensive or not shouldnt matter or should it, Im not kissing bottom but you have a great reputation for playing great sets and keeping it fresh but not every DJ is like yourself and thats where the problem (if it is a problem) of unfresh and predictable sets by DJs that is being highlighted time and again.

Sorry for having a different view on things but thats how i have seen it.

Bearsy

God no, I didn't break those tunes. I just sold then on the crest of demand and the only reason I mention them is to underline that I am not a chaser of indemand records shades.gif

You comment about me keeping, or at least trying to keep my set fresh highlights why I might seem to be getting anoyed, becasue at no point have I ever been one to chase indemanders, quite the reverse in fact! "Keeping you box hot", "hot boxing", is just a daft expresiion for not being afraid to let tunes go once you realise they are not needed anymore, IF you focus is on DJing an interesting, rare and exciting set if you do not have a bottemless pit of cash.

This is been going on for 48 hours now. Is everyone clear now? :unsure:

Edited by James Trouble
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Guest Bearsy

God no, I didn't break those tunes. I just sold then on the crest of demand :unsure:

You comment about me keeping, or at least trying to keep my set fresh highlights why I might seem to be getting anoyed, becasue at no point have I ever been one to chase indemanders, quite the reverse in fact! "Keeping you box hot", "hot boxing", is just a daft expresiion for not being afraid to let tunes go once you realise they are not needed anymore, IF you focus is on DJing an interesting, rare and exciting set if you do not have a bottemless pit of cash.

This is been going on for 48 hours now. Is everyone clear now? :thumbsup:

when you put it like that about hotboxing i think i understand where your coming from now, you get leaders and followers in everything JT, One thing i think we all would agree on is that a very rich person does not gaurantee a great DJ, knowledge and passion is the key for me thumbsup.gif

i hope it wasnt me that annoyed you :lol:

Edited by Bearsy
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was speaking to a mate about Djs and all that, he reckoned the best are normally from outside the Uk, they have no fear, play anything thats good no matter how much its worth and all that and mix it up more..

I'd have to agree, allot of djs in the Uk can be very predictable..

Mal.C

x I would def say that the majority of the best dj's are from Uk even though many good ones come from other countrys. its all depending which event they are dj'ing at. In outside uk events its often a tiny hardcore fanbase that know the records being played others just enjoying whatever record you play. its not really fair to compare as many non uk clubs are working more as normal town clubs with many goers either what being played .

To fil a full northern dancefloor in Uk with 400 people driving several M-roads and junctions you cant tot freestyle I guess. must though admit I have heard some uk dj's doing better sets in Scandinavia than in Uk do to they can play whatever they want. Now home to football !

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Guest dundeedavie

i think we can conclude that some people understand and embrace the hot box theory and some will never like it .......personally i love the idea and have been inadvertently doing it for a while

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Guest James Trouble

i hope it wasnt me that annoyed you :unsure:

:lol: Just frustration at being dragged into a 2 day long discussion and not being understood dispite going over the same point again and again frusty2.gif

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Has there a new breed of dj come around these days?

The ones I grew up with were collectors, that played their collection, yet I have read so many posts about selling stuff cos it didn't floor-pack and wanting the latest in demander.....and this hot-box thing!?

I know there are bound to be lads that are old skool but how prevelant is this mentality of buying and selling to make DJ status.

Is it what it's all about?

Some of the biggest names in the 70s were notorious hot boxers....and it's not just the young DJs either - had a chat with one of the scene's elder DJ's the other day and was surprised (amazed) at the records he has got rid of to finance new purchases.

I like the point about leaders and followers, essentially DJs are one or the other......I'd also question whether the same record should be played more than once, especially at an evening do - I won't play anything that someone else has already played.

The good DJ I think needs to

a) believe in themselves

b have some exclusives

c) carry some requests / big sounds.

d) not just chase "trophy records"

Edited by Steve G
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Guest Netspeaky

Talk about crap being talked, if DJ's weren't hot boxers then we would certainly not have the situation of DJ's playing the same sets, when guesting at soul nights up and down the country. How the hell do you think records become 'hot' it's hardly down to the fact a single DJ is playing it is it, it's because other pick up on it, it becomes a must have and before you know it every man and his dog is playing it. This has happened since day one on the scene, it's were the word Pop (Popular) comes from. This is why £10 records become £50 must wants over night. Most DJ's are expected to play some of these HOT records in their spots, punters demand it. This isn't just restricted to the played out oldies nights either, even the lets play something different clubs become what's that, that's just been played I need a copy for my next spot. Anybody who can't see this has their head up their arse. whistling.gif:unsure:

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The good DJ I think needs to

a) believe in themselves

b have some exclusives

c) carry some requests / big sounds.

d) not just chase "trophy records"

++++++++++++++++

I agree with those points Steve , not sure about doing requests though ( only joking :unsure: ) ..

also on the NS scene you need a Network of highly knowledged and trusted people , especially if you are youngish thumbsup.gif

Simon

Edited by Simon M
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I'm not sure I understand the concept of 'hotbox' either. If it's what I think it is, surely in principle a DJ's 'hotbox' will just (in essence) contain at least half the same records as any other DJ's 'hotbox' ?

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Guest uroffal

Not quite, run it by me one more time :unsure:

Try the new edition of the Oxford English Dictionary - I reckon it'll be be one of the additions. Especially as it's already become a marketing buzzword - seen it used on a sales thread on here today 'former Sam Hotbox item' - brilliant laugh.gif

Edited by uroffal
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Talk about crap being talked, if DJ's weren't hot boxers then we would certainly not have the situation of DJ's playing the same sets, when guesting at soul nights up and down the country. How the hell do you think records become 'hot' it's hardly down to the fact a single DJ is playing it is it, it's because other pick up on it, it becomes a must have and before you know it every man and his dog is playing it. This has happened since day one on the scene, it's were the word Pop (Popular) comes from. This is why £10 records become £50 must wants over night. Most DJ's are expected to play some of these HOT records in their spots, punters demand it. This isn't just restricted to the played out oldies nights either, even the lets play something different clubs become what's that, that's just been played I need a copy for my next spot. Anybody who can't see this has their head up their arse. whistling.gif:unsure:

Some of us would say that once everyone has got the sound it's no longer "hot". :lol:

I think I'll start a thread what shouldn't be in a hot box.....starting with the Hamilton Movement, followed by Tolbert. :thumbsup:

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