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johndelve

Spinning Around: A History of Soul LP Volume 2 L-Z

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My new book is now available for purchase and thank you to those who have already bought a copy.  The words on the back cover are

self-explanatory to explain project. Price of this hardback book is merely £20 with £2.90 postage. I can sell anywhere in world but postage will obviously be

higher. Please contact me directly to arrange sales. Thanks.

1944513329_finalcoverCMYKweb.thumb.jpg.50854fb5c8f46782f41437a14a317ec1.jpg

Insideweb.jpg

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, johndelve said:

My new book is now available for purchase and thank you to those who have already bought a copy.  The words on the back cover are

self-explanatory to explain project. Price of this hardback book is merely £20 with £2.90 postage. I can sell anywhere in world but postage will obviously be

higher. Please contact me directly to arrange sales. Thanks.

1944513329_finalcoverCMYKweb.thumb.jpg.50854fb5c8f46782f41437a14a317ec1.jpg

Insideweb.jpg

John , in the Sharon Sole entry it says that the Susan Phillips LP was never actually released but we had a thread a  few years back in which it was confirmed that  the Susan Phillips LP was in fact released and a member posted photos of the LP.  

 

Edited by sunnysoul

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7 hours ago, sunnysoul said:

John , in the Sharon Sole entry it says that the Susan Phillips LP was never actually released but we had a thread a  few years back in which it was confirmed that  the Susan Phillips LP was in fact released and a member posted photos of the LP.  

 

Very very interesting...I'd certainly never seen evidence of it, not seen the thread to which you refer and not one ever listed on popsike either. However, a photo seems compelling evidence and that sticker in bottom right corner is intriguing. Not seen one of those on any other All Platinum release.. could it be a foreign issue? Anyway, thanks very much for letting me know.  Best, John

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, johndelve said:

Very very interesting...I'd certainly never seen evidence of it, not seen the thread to which you refer and not one ever listed on popsike either. However, a photo seems compelling evidence and that sticker in bottom right corner is intriguing. Not seen one of those on any other All Platinum release.. could it be a foreign issue? Anyway, thanks very much for letting me know.  Best, John

Not a sticker John. The LP released immediately after the Susan Phillips LP  (AP 3006) was Donnie Elbert's Where Did Our Love Go (AP 3007) and that LP has a similar design identifying the label at  the bottom right of the front cover ....   it's part of the sleeve itself, not stuck on.

R-2947606-1347446731-2474.jpeg.jpg

Edited by sunnysoul

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Just checked my own Donnie Elbert copy and you're right...my mind must have gone blank on that...so, yes, no doubt to me then that Susan exists...what a great bit of info...puts it in the all-time rare category....that's one thing my book is for, to stimulate discussion!  thanks again...John

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4 minutes ago, johndelve said:

Just checked my own Donnie Elbert copy and you're right...my mind must have gone blank on that...so, yes, no doubt to me then that Susan exists...what a great bit of info...puts it in the all-time rare category....that's one thing my book is for, to stimulate discussion!  thanks again...John

Also on that snapshot of your book at the top of this thread regarding the SOS Band , you may be interested to know that SOS Band vocalist Mary Davis is very possibly the same artist as the Mary Davis who released an excellent 7" on Conclave in the late 60's ... 

 

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I've spent a couple of hours this morning skim reading (because it needs much longer to digest properly) Vol 2.

Together with Vol 1, it's my "one book" which i would take to Desert Island ( disks).

well done John, and many thanks.

ATB

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I've had this monumental volume for several days now and wanted to convey to Soul Source how worthwhile and impressive 'The History of The Soul Lp' actually is. 

Lias has reviewed and apparently listened to 6,000 soul albums to produce the definitive history of the Soul Music LP. Familiar names such as: Otis Redding, Mary Wells, Temptations, The Whispers, Johnnie Taylor and Sly Stone are comprehensively covered alongside terminally obscure artists that include: Ricky Lance,Tody Tucker, Richard Paradise, New York Port Authority. The ambition and the knowledge displayed throughout is to be applauded. Lias acknowledges the support of some fine doyens of soul writing especially David Cole and John Ridley but this is his own outstanding contribution. John is opinionated but his passion for the music is self evident. I found myself absorbed in his opinions some with which I didn't agree but many of which corresponded with mine. Throughout Lias' love of the genre is evident and he transmitted that passion to me. I felt engaged throughout. 

Whereas the golden age of the 60s and 70s predominates with coverage of a broad spectrum of Lps from: Motown to Southern to Big City to Chicago there is also room for a number of LPs covering associated genres that include:  New Orleans style artists (Tommy Ridgley for example), Latin soul artists (Ralfi Pagan) and some blues-soul artists (Little Milton for example). Obviously USA released albums predominate but where an artist issued an LP in the foreign market they are included (Wess Machine's two Italian only albums are here for example). The whole exercise is a joy to read throughout and my copy will surely become as well thumped as the first edition.

As we all know Soul music is littered with artists that didn't get their just deserves and were ignored by the mainstream music press.  John Lias seeks to address the injustice and succeeds. He's a fine writer whose prose generally flows and I was absorbed in the content. A real triumph I think.

'Roburt' has written a review elsewhere on this site.

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This is about the first part and I'm really pleased I didn't find out about it sooner, cos I wouldn't have been able to wait for part two. It's not perfect, but may be the best book yet on Soul Music, give or take Pruters' Chicago Soul.

It's actually a bit scary how much I agree with and how much of it reminds me of my own experience discovering albums by Marvin, Al Green, Sam Dees, Luther Ingram, Garland Green, Johnny Adams, ZZ Hill, Willie Hutch, John Edwards, Eddie Hinton, the Dells, Ashford and Simpson, Sandra Feva etc etc.

He still over-rates Paul Kelly in a way I don't and didn't over-rate Luther Ingram, but I'm guessing he gets that now.

I agree that Lamont isn't yer typical Soul Singer, but when it works it works, and I don't think his music necessarily suffers as a result of any short-comings. Moreover, I think this is mirrored in other Soul Singers more famous for writing, including George Jackson, Eddie Hinton, Frank (O) Johnson Dan Penn and Nick Ashford (as he recognises).

He suggests that Sam Dees wasn't aware of his popularity in this country until he turned up in London in 89. I'm pretty sure his Southport appearance was his first ever in the UK and his manager assured me that he was well aware that, to an admittedly small number of people, he was a God. The people who weren't at Southport thought he was brilliant at Morecambe six months later and I'm guessing this coincided with London and I'm wondering if he had a band in the capital. I remember him on Newsnight playing piano and singing a brilliant rendition of One in a Million You, a song I never really liked by Larry Graham, for whom he wrote it, but I'm guessing this was a year or two later. 

It isn't OTT on vinylism but he perhaps overstates the signigicance of the format, in that everybody who ever made a forty minute vinyls album was creating a complete work of art but everybody stopped when CDs came out and just started bringing out collections of unrelated songs. Neither position is credible and I think that period simply coincided with an historic period of creativity in music which was probably over and certainly passed its heyday before CDs took over.

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I've only just got round to buying part one and have to say I wish I'd got round to it earlier.  Fabulously written and put together, essential piece of writing for the collector.  Just need Part 2 now!

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