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Always wondered , in that magical period from say 1967 to 1972 , was there ever any ACTIVE interaction between the rare soul scene and the ska/skinhead/suedehead scenes?

Obviously there were loads of people in that era who were into different types of music at the same time and would buy various records , and it's well known that your typical skinhead at that time was just as happy playing a Motown Chartbusters LP as much as their latest Trojan 45 purchase or whatever ....

But I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

And vice versa, were there groups of soulies that would have one foot in each camp ?

:thumbsup:

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Guest Dante

Always wondered , in that magical period from say 1967 to 1972 , was there ever any ACTIVE interaction between the rare soul scene and the ska/skinhead/suedehead scenes?

Obviously there were loads of people in that era who were into different types of music at the same time and would buy various records , and it's well known that your typical skinhead at that time was just as happy playing a Motown Chartbusters LP as much as their latest Trojan 45 purchase or whatever ....

But I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

And vice versa, were there groups of soulies that would have one foot in each camp ?

:thumbsup:

Hi there,

Acording to the Wigan member Adrian J McMannus in an interview with the spanish fanzine "The Corporation", he get into the soul scene because of the Youth Clubs. There, some suedeheads began to import some rare USA soul records. Besides the glam n pop records, the Trojan LPs were very popular. I think this is the only information i have. You asked about the skin/suede scene, but I think that is a lot more influenciated by the mod scene...

Cheers

Dante

Edited by Dante
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Always wondered , in that magical period from say 1967 to 1972 , was there ever any ACTIVE interaction between the rare soul scene and the ska/skinhead/suedehead scenes?

Obviously there were loads of people in that era who were into different types of music at the same time and would buy various records , and it's well known that your typical skinhead at that time was just as happy playing a Motown Chartbusters LP as much as their latest Trojan 45 purchase or whatever ....

But I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

And vice versa, were there groups of soulies that would have one foot in each camp ?

:thumbsup:

I'm not sure there was any such thing as a "ska do". Unless your counting "Blues Parties" held in private houses in West Indian neighbourhoods. Ska and reggae was just part of the dance or early disco culture, but you'd hear it alongside Stax, Motown, Atlantic as well as loads of pop. Skinheads might travel a few miles for a ruck, but the only clubbers who were going long haul were post-mods or Wheelites IMHO.

Edited by Dayo
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We had ska nights in Putney (London) in 67/68ish at St Mary's church hall, it was called the Ska Bar, the dj was Neville Your Musical Enchanter. He played a mixture of ska and rocksteady. they were great nights for a while, until the audience divided racially into late mods/early skins and west indian youths and that was the end of that.The majority of us moddy types were into the soul of the time ie Stax/Atlantic/Motown/Sue, Leon Haywood's Mellow Moonlight was big in Putney, the local HMV shop sold it on import, which seemed very exotic at the time.

A year or so later down the road in Wimbledon there was Reggae City, which was more Skin oriented.

The other Tone

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We had ska nights in Putney (London) in 67/68ish at St Mary's church hall, it was called the Ska Bar, the dj was Neville Your Musical Enchanter. He played a mixture of ska and rocksteady. they were great nights for a while, until the audience divided racially into late mods/early skins and west indian youths and that was the end of that.The majority of us moddy types were into the soul of the time ie Stax/Atlantic/Motown/Sue, Leon Haywood's Mellow Moonlight was big in Putney, the local HMV shop sold it on import, which seemed very exotic at the time.

A year or so later down the road in Wimbledon there was Reggae City, which was more Skin oriented.

The other Tone

That's interesting, I had always assumed that the ska / rock steady era had its own accepted well known clubs in various pockets of the country , like the Wheel or the Mojo but perhaps on a smaller scale, where skins would congregate on the weekend, or was skinhead culture really just a localised thing in each city or town where it was really all about just going to pubs or the football or beating up some poor unfortunate and then just playing their ska records at home ?

:thumbsup:

Edited by sunnysoul
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That's interesting, I had always assumed that the ska / rock steady era had its own accepted well known clubs in various pockets of the country , like the Wheel or the Mojo but perhaps on a smaller scale, where skins would congregate on the weekend, or was skinhead culture really just a localised thing in each city or town where it was really all about just going to pubs or the football or beating up some poor unfortunate and then just playing their ska records at home ?

whistling.gif

Skinheads and good taste in music do not really go hand in hand. My feeling is that the whole skin/ska link has been overstated - at least for first generation skins. There was far too much rivalry between skins from various towns for them to get together and groove to Prince Buster just for the vibe of it. They would meet for a ruck, but not for love of music. Football, fags and skinhead girls all ranked higher on the average skins list of priorities.

Col

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Guest Stuart T

Skinheads and good taste in music do not really go hand in hand. My feeling is that the whole skin/ska link has been overstated - at least for first generation skins. There was far too much rivalry between skins from various towns for them to get together and groove to Prince Buster just for the vibe of it. They would meet for a ruck, but not for love of music. Football, fags and skinhead girls all ranked higher on the average skins list of priorities.

Col

Eh?! So ska, rocksteady and reggae do not represent good taste in music? Theres plenty of old skinheads about still building up their record collections, although its mainly rocksteady and reggae, not ska. Football may have given many an excuse for a ruck but theres many on the northern soul scene who were/are in the same boat. Having said that, my cousin was a skin in the late sixties and didn't own a single record :angry: and says he liked fighting, girls and football in that order whistling.gif .

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Guest trojan skin

Ive been a skinhead for many years, Ive always been into northern soul and have quite a good collection dont know many other skinheads that collect though but most that I know prefer northern to ska/rocksteady. Wasn't pat brady a skinhead?

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Ive been a skinhead for many years, Ive always been into northern soul and have quite a good collection dont know many other skinheads that collect though but most that I know prefer northern to ska/rocksteady. Wasn't pat brady a skinhead?

He is now whistling.gif

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Guest Stuart T

He is now whistling.gif

:yes:

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Guest trojan skin
whistling.gif
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Skinheads and good taste in music do not really go hand in hand. My feeling is that the whole skin/ska link has been overstated - at least for first generation skins. There was far too much rivalry between skins from various towns for them to get together and groove to Prince Buster just for the vibe of it. They would meet for a ruck, but not for love of music. Football, fags and skinhead girls all ranked higher on the average skins list of priorities. By the way I like it up the bum.

Col

Ahaar,

Bit of a sweeping statement thar Dayo, ya Landlubber.

Yarr.

Edited by pikeys dog
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Guest Mart B

My own town mansfield had a very big skinhead following and i know for a fact that alot was into motown and ska.We had alot of rivalry with the coalmines and pit villages in full swing and mansfield town centre on weekend nights in the late 60s early 70s was packed and most pubs were playing club soul.So us younger brothers had motown and club stuff rammed down our throats as time went on yes you guessed it ended up into northern soul bigtime.In hindsight the records my brother used to get from soulbowl and send them back because they didnt sound like motown if only.

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Always wondered , in that magical period from say 1967 to 1972 , was there ever any ACTIVE interaction between the rare soul scene and the ska/skinhead/suedehead scenes?

Obviously there were loads of people in that era who were into different types of music at the same time and would buy various records , and it's well known that your typical skinhead at that time was just as happy playing a Motown Chartbusters LP as much as their latest Trojan 45 purchase or whatever ....

But I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

And vice versa, were there groups of soulies that would have one foot in each camp ?

:thumbsup:

You've already mentioned the Wheel, where I understand soul was played alongside Jamaican music but in reply to were there soulies in each camp... there certainly were a little later than the period you mentioned!

I can remember a few of us used to go to the odd night in Peterborough, around '75,6 where northern was played alongside funk and Jamaican music.

Strangely, as I recall, it was best not to mention this at nighters. :yes:

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During the Ska/Rocksteady period of 1965-1968 when I was living in Hackney, East London (I was only a nipper), my dad got friendly with a Jamaican guy who they used to call 'The King Of The Darkies'...his words, not mine! This guy couldn't drive and asked me dad to drive him around in exchange for money....rather like a personal taxi driver I suppose. Suffice to say, dad got invited to 'blues parties' around the Hackney area....he say's there were white people at these parties but many were women....mmmmm.

I also remember dad going to the Lycium Ballroom reggae nights (can't recall where that was though, somewhere in North London I think) and that must have been around 1968/69 and saying it was full of 'yobbos'. So I guess that must have been the skinheads.

Anyway, dad amassed a collection of Blue Beats, Island, Doctor Bird etc which he'd pick up at these parties, many from off the floor (some even have stilletoe prints indented in them!). When we moved to Norfolk, he stuck all his records (including some real shite, Rock n Roll & Soul) in our garage where they remained, getting mouldy and damp for years! When he buggered off with some tart, I was already into Northern Soul and begining to also get into the Two-Tone sound (1979/80)....remembering those Blue Beats still in the garage I plundered them and so started a healthy collection of ska/rocksteady/reggae alongside my Northern Soul. The gang I hung around with were all skinheads/rudies and I remember we were all into both sounds (soul & ska). Still am and still wear a crombie!

Pete Smith knows the score!

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Eh?! So ska, rocksteady and reggae do not represent good taste in music? Theres plenty of old skinheads about still building up their record collections, although its mainly rocksteady and reggae, not ska. Football may have given many an excuse for a ruck but theres many on the northern soul scene who were/are in the same boat. Having said that, my cousin was a skin in the late sixties and didn't own a single record :angry: and says he liked fighting, girls and football in that order :lol: .

Of course ska, rock steady and reggae shows good taste! smile.gif

I was a first generation skinhead and, as far as I remember, music was a small part of the lifestyle compared to causing random mayhem. Most of the skins up here were brainless, racist, petty thugs.

The media loves to portray late 60's skins as music lovin' trendsetters. It's a great story but in my experience, it just wasn't true. The kids I knew may have bought the odd Tighten Up collection, but I never knew a single serious devotee or collector.

Of course, it may have been diffrent elsewhere... :boxing:

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I remember Blues parties in the Handsworth area of Birmingham my late father in law used to be awake all night on a saturday cause of them(couldnt sleep cause of the noise),but he used to get his own back with many a knife hole in tyres should of heard the language in the morning. smile.gif

the Le Metro in Bham used to play a good mixture of Ska and soul 1967/1973ish

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Always wondered , in that magical period from say 1967 to 1972 , was there ever any ACTIVE interaction between the rare soul scene and the ska/skinhead/suedehead scenes?

I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

And vice versa, were there groups of soulies that would have one foot in each camp ?

smile.gif

I would have said that most of us around that time would have gone to clubs (and Youth clubs) and had both feet in both camps.

When I was a young Mod (then Skinhead, Then Suedehead, Then Mod again) Soul music and Reggae were played and enjoyed (and danced to) side by side.

A typical playlist might include:

Young Gifted And Black

You Can Get It If You Really Want

Wonderful World, Beautiful People

The Ten Commandments

Love Of The Common People

54 46 Was My Number

Skinhead Moon Stomp (+ Must Catch A Train)

Wreck a Pum Pum

You Got Soul

Al Capone

Long Shot Kick De Bucket

Israelites

Big Five

Pinkney Gal

And these would rub shoulders, seamlessly, alongside

Needle In A Haystack

I Got A Feeling

Going To A Happening

Heaven Must Have Sent You

Help Me

I'm Gonna Miss You

Everybody's Going To A Love In

The Cheater

I Got What It Takes

I'll Always Love You etc.

Even those 'Soul Fans / Mods' who understood the distinction would still dance to and collect Reggae alongside Soul.

Most of my mates collected and appreciated both Soul & Reggae in equal parts and I've still got all of the above in my collection from that time. Not 'Reggae Hardcore' I know, but very much a part of my youth.

So as far as ACTIVE interaction between scenes goes, I'd say that (at least up north) they were one and the same.

Sean Hampsey

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Guest rasfoz

yeah got to admit being a rastafarian everybody expects me to be some pot smoking dub reggae fiend, but its plain old soul music thats number one for me, funny how you get stereotyped innit

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Guest rasfoz

yeah got to admit being a rastafarian everybody expects me to be some pot smoking dub reggae fiend, but its plain old soul music thats number one for me, funny how you get stereotyped innit

sorry getting away from the subject yeah i got a lot of ska rocksteady too but soul is king indoors ska is for the car :thumbsup:

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"I also remember dad going to the Lycium Ballroom reggae nights (can't recall where that was though, somewhere in North London I think)"

Would that have been the Lyceum ballroom in the Strand?

When I used to go to the Mod clubs in the West End circa 63-66, ska was played, but it was called Bluebeat, after the record label. Generally the occasional record, not long sets of it. However it was obviously different in clubs where the majority of patrons were of West Indian descent. I remember going to a club in Lewisham with a mate, a fair trek for me from north London, and being disappointed that it was Bluebeat almost all the evening.

At Mod clubs the records I principally remember are the Folks Brothers' Carolina and Prince Buster's Madness, etc. Also Gypsy Woman by Derrick and Patsy. Obviously loads of others played, but memory lets me down. I saw Prince Buster when he appeared at the Marquee (66 or 67) but was disappointed. Perhaps he didn't have the same musicians as on his records, loved those slightly off key trumpets.

I noticed that from 66 onwards various clubs seemed to be playing far more Bluebeat (or ska) than soul, I remember the Flamingo one night like that. Also when the Scene reopened after being shut due to drug raids it went over mainly to ska. Manor House Bluesville did the same, but much later.

I stopped going to those clubs because of that, don't mind a bit of ska, but after about 3 records I've had enough in a club.

My recollection is that most of my friends bought soul records, and the occasional ska, but others may have done the opposite. I vaguely remember reading that Richard Searling was originally into ska before soul.

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Would that have been the Lyceum ballroom in the Strand?

I saw Prince Buster when he appeared at the Marquee (66 or 67) but was disappointed. Perhaps he didn't have the same musicians as on his records, loved those slightly off key trumpets.

I'll ask the old man next time I see him about the Lyceum Ballroom.

Prince Buster used a UK band on his UK tours, one band he has used were the 'Les Dawson Band' I kid you not, but obviously not the comedian! On the 45s recorded in Jamaica his backing band were the brilliant 'Buster's All Stars' who had some of the Skatalites musicians involved also that's why they sound 100 times better. 'Buster's All Stars' instrumentals (loads available on Blue Beat) are top notch, especially from the 1965-66 period and fetch huge wonga.

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Guest Oggie

The Ad-Lib Club in Lincoln is in an original Mod Club which started in 1965 it plays a superb mix of Soul,Ska and R&B ..Great place! :lol:

Oggie.

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Am going to send up a few clips of Busters All Stars instrumentals.

1) Jet 707 - this probably features the best soloing on any ska instrumental, it's unbelievable. 2) Vera Cruz - This is nearly as good except at around the 2 minute mark, they all apear to play out of tune on purpose! See if you agree.

3) Rhyging - names after the outlaw that the film the Harder They Come Was based on, this is a lesser known instrumental but great all the same

4) The Fugitive - obviously inspired by the TV program...forgot I had this to be honest so enjoy!

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Guest Stuart T

, they all apear to play out of tune on purpose! See if you agree.

Out of tune? Thems discordant harmonies Pete, thats jaaazz man! Nice! :unsure:

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Guest Stuart T

Really??? No wonder I don't get jazz!

Everyone got a bit of jazz inside of them Pete. Haven't you seen the Mighty Boosh? :unsure:

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This is a picture I did for a cd I made. If anyone can tell me the program I used to enable me to cut out circular labels and lay them over each other I'd be very grateful as I have absolutely no idea how I did it!

(It's in the ska topic cos it's ska labels)

Edited by Pete-S
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Guest uroffal

This is a picture I did for a cd I made. If anyone can tell me the program I used to enable me to cut out circular labels and lay them over each other I'd be very grateful as I have absolutely no idea how I did it!

(It's in the ska topic cos it's ska labels)

You need Adobe Photoshop mate.

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You need Adobe Photoshop mate.

Ah thats it. Cheers. Been trying to do the same thing in ms publisher and it won't cut circles!

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But I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

I don't remember skinheads at the Wheel. As Dayo has said, skinheads were really a different beastie.

For fashions, have a look at this photograph of the crowd in one of the rooms at the Wheel when Ben E King appeared circa 1969.

post-1904-1153913195.jpg

Edited by Billy Freemantle
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Out of tune? Thems discordant harmonies Pete, thats jaaazz man! Nice! :yes:

The famous jazz label Blue Note got its name from the deliberate discord or 'blue notes' that mnusiciams stove for. Bit of paper would even be stuck inside pioanos to make the keys strike wrongly to produce discords. One of the differences between some early Northern and chart hit soul is also the existence of disharmonies in the former.

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I don't remember skinheads at the Wheel. As Dayo has said, skinheads were really a different beastie.

For fashions, have a look at this photograph of the crowd in one of the rooms at the Wheel when Ben E King appeared circa 1969.

I'd guess that photo was taken later than 69. Skinhead clothes but hair grown out. 70-71?

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I'd guess that photo was taken later than 69. Skinhead clothes but hair grown out. 70-71?

No, I don't think it was as late as 1971. Ben E King appeared more than once at the Wheel I think , but I think this is 1969 or 1970 at the latest. I also think one of those heads is mine.

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Does it look the same now?? If so, you're a lucky man :yes:

Yes, it does. Did you know that baldness is related to mathematics? 20% of 20 year olds lose their hair, 30% of 30 year olds, 40% of 40 year olds etc. Of course, by the time we get to 100 the situation changes a bit.

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Guest musicden786

Good topic.

Heres a bit more just in case its of any interest

Jimmy Saville, when he was the DJ at the Plaza Dance Hall Oxford Road Manchester, brought together a good number of people, black and white, who were interested in different kinds of music. Rock, Soul, Blues and early Dance Tempo Raggae.

He also established a meeting place were records could be purchased and exchanged with the GIs from Burtonwood Airbase.The location was the Long Bar under the The Gaumont Cinema Oxford Road Manchester. By 1967 this was a known location to buy rare imported records.

Unfortunatly The Long Bar was also home for many Manchester Gangsters and was often raided by the Police.

Hope this adds to the topic.

Denis.

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Good topic.

Heres a bit more just in case its of any interest

Jimmy Saville, when he was the DJ at the Plaza Dance Hall Oxford Road Manchester, brought together a good number of people, black and white, who were interested in different kinds of music. Rock, Soul, Blues and early Dance Tempo Raggae.

He also established a meeting place were records could be purchased and exchanged with the GIs from Burtonwood Airbase.The location was the Long Bar under the The Gaumont Cinema Oxford Road Manchester. By 1967 this was a known location to buy rare imported records.

Unfortunatly The Long Bar was also home for many Manchester Gangsters and was often raided by the Police.

Hope this adds to the topic.

Denis.

Would that have been the Trafford Long Bar with reputedly the longest pub bar in England that i used to visit in the late sixties ?
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My own town mansfield had a very big skinhead following and i know for a fact that alot was into motown and ska.We had alot of rivalry with the coalmines and pit villages in full swing and mansfield town centre on weekend nights in the late 60s early 70s was packed and most pubs were playing club soul.So us younger brothers had motown and club stuff rammed down our throats as time went on yes you guessed it ended up into northern soul bigtime.In hindsight the records my brother used to get from soulbowl and send them back because they didnt sound like motown if only.

youre old town didnt do a lot of Ska

but did do

Brown cow/horse and groom.colours/bells/swan/tufty/ major club soul venues

and riots went on when worksop came to town or newark or lincoln even sutton and kirkby came to town,even the squinting cat did a good soul night and clipstone youth club was a massive motown playing unit on a thursday night,

I was there

Doug

:yes:biggrin.gif

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Guest Soulbrew

The famous jazz label Blue Note got its name from the deliberate discord or 'blue notes' that mnusiciams stove for. Bit of paper would even be stuck inside pioanos to make the keys strike wrongly to produce discords. One of the differences between some early Northern and chart hit soul is also the existence of disharmonies in the former.

As you said, the label is called Blue note because of the blue note (note the missing s): in the

pentatonic or blues scale there's only one Blue Note.

As for the soul/skin/mod/ska debate, while in London, some of the Camden skins used to

snob Ska because "Ska is not skinhead music, ska is fo mods." That was justified by the

fact that Ska period ended in 66/67 and the first skins came around in 68 or so.

It should also be mentioned that there were JA singers like Slim Smith and Ken Parker that

where deep into US soul. You should check out "Ain't too proud to beg" by Slim Smith and

U-Roy on Bullet, that's a killer indeed!!!!

Sir Coxsone for one used to get records from US to cut his versions....

On early Blue Beat singles there's a lot of what's called JA R&B, which is a bit too weak to

me, but might be someone else's cuppa, y'know...

Just some thoughts to get the topics rolling. It's very interesting!

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Judging from the interesting and informative posts in this topic so far, would it be reasonable to conclude that the traditional perception of the original skinhead movement as consisting of youths obsessively collecting ska/bluebeat/rocksteady records (in a similar way to the Northern Soul scene) is in fact an inaccurate perception ????

If anything, it would appear that the later mod and ska/rude boy revivalists of the late 70's were much more into collecting original rare ska records...

Does everybody agree? :thumbsup:

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You should check out "Ain't too proud to beg" by Slim Smith and

U-Roy on Bullet, that's a killer indeed!!!!

Even better if you just go for Slim & The Uniques version without the DJ, it's on Gas, but the B side is even better, "Love And Devotion", killer late rocksteady (have posted clip up here before)

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Guest Soulbrew

Even better if you just go for Slim & The Uniques version without the DJ, it's on Gas, but the B side is even better, "Love And Devotion", killer late rocksteady (have posted clip up here before)

I got it on JA blank smile.gif:D:Dwink.gif:Dwink.gif , along another couple of his cuts on Unity. Shame

the fella died mad like the late great Don Drummond...

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Guest Stuart T

I got it on JA blank smile.gif:D:Dwink.gif:Dwink.gif , along another couple of his cuts on Unity. Shame

the fella died mad like the late great Don Drummond...

Trojan have done a fantastic double CD of his best material, did Tony Rounce compile it? Great sleeve nots including the story of his tragic death. Anyway, if someone fancies some proper Jamaican soul get that CD, its a cracker. The Heartbeat Alton Ellis CD also has some great soul versions of his rocksteady tunes.

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Guest Soulbrew

Trojan have done a fantastic double CD of his best material, did Tony Rounce compile it? Great sleeve nots including the story of his tragic death. Anyway, if someone fancies some proper Jamaican soul get that CD, its a cracker. The Heartbeat Alton Ellis CD also has some great soul versions of his rocksteady tunes.

There's also Studio One Soul CD and LP by them lads at Soul Jazz Records down in London.

Nothing to write home about but the packaging is nice indeed!

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There's also Studio One Soul CD and LP by them lads at Soul Jazz Records down in London.

Nothing to write home about but the packaging is nice indeed!

Same with all their stuff...flatters to decieve

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Always wondered , in that magical period from say 1967 to 1972 , was there ever any ACTIVE interaction between the rare soul scene and the ska/skinhead/suedehead scenes?

Obviously there were loads of people in that era who were into different types of music at the same time and would buy various records , and it's well known that your typical skinhead at that time was just as happy playing a Motown Chartbusters LP as much as their latest Trojan 45 purchase or whatever ....

But I'm very curious to know, were there ever any identifiable groups of skinheads (and I don't mean one or two isolated individuals) that would go to the Wheel in Manchester one weekend , and then the next weekend go to a ska do somewhere else in the country ?

And vice versa, were there groups of soulies that would have one foot in each camp ?

whistling.gif

My brother was a Mod in the latter era, circa 67/68, in High Wycombe. Whilst he would never have described himself as a "Soulie", Soul (albeit mainstream Motown, Stax etc - though when I got into Northern he said he recognised a number of the Mod-era type things I was getting into, like Fascinations "Girls Are Out To Get You" etc) was very much his bag, alongside your usual chart stuff, the Who, Small Faces, Kinks etc. But he was also very into Blue Beat and Ska. He used to tell me that Friday nights at the Town Hall in Wycombe, unless a band was on (he saw loads there - Pink Floyd, Cream, the Who etc etc etc), were dance night and the music was almost all Soul, Motown, Ska, Blue Beat and R'n'B (John Lee Hooker, Howling Wolf etc). Regular Friday night dance bands were Geno Washington and the Ram Jam Band (he was based at the USAF Base in Wycombe at the time) and Jimmy James & the Vagabonds.

Sorry, I'll get to the point!!! Ska and Blue Beat were apparently mixed heavily at these nights with Soul and although Ian would certainly have described himself as a Mod, he also told me that this was definitely the early emergence of skinheads/seudeheads, who were dressing down slightly from the full Mod look, whilst not completely moving away from it. In fact, his hair at that time was definitely of the seudehead/crewcut persuasion rather than your classic Steve Marriot/Paul Weller-Jam days type Mod haircut.

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Guest Soulbrew

Same with all their stuff...flatters to decieve

You have to admit that Studio One Djs is choco-block full of killer tunes though...

So far i've managed to get hold of two tracks ;-) Have you got any for sale?

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  1. 41 Rare Northern Soul,sweet Soul,modern Soul,gospel Soul,funk 45s On Ebay
    Sale Websites by natural high on Mon 03 Sep 2012
    • 3 / 693
    • natural high on 09 Sep 2012
  2. Mixcloud: Old Soul, New Soul, Obscure Soul, Unreleased Soul
    All About The Soul by Russell Gilbert on Sat 11 Oct 2014
    • 2 / 1013
    • Russell Gilbert on 16 Oct 2014
  3. Sweet Soul/texas Soul/northern Soul/panama Soul 4 Sale
    Record Sales by tumadrejafrau on Sat 26 Mar 2016
    • 3 / 1986
    • tumadrejafrau on 24 Apr 2016
  4. 20 Boogie Soul / Indie Soul / Modern Soul 12s Added
    Sale Websites by glynthornhill on Tue 08 Jun 2010
    • 1 / 378
    • glynthornhill on 08 Jun 2010
  5. Original 70's Soul/crossover/modern Soul/northern Soul 45's For Sale
    Record Sales by Steve Plumb on Mon 24 Jan 2011
    • 3 / 3238
    • Steve Plumb on 27 Jan 2011
    • 1 / 785
    • REVILOT on 04 May 2011
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