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neal bull

Is it, time to sell up.?

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Never know if it’s the right time to sell up,

are there still collectors out there, is there demand,

do people still appreciate good quality tunes.?

not sure as I don’t go to many soul nights etc now.

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Hi Neal,

From a financial perspective, I think now is a pretty good time, and I'm sure lots will agree, some records you can't put a price on now because there are buyers about that will pay good money and some for something they want that is hardly ever seen up for sale.

But it's not all about the money! Although one has to be able to afford to keep a collection if some items are worth a lot. As in, if you need something to live, it's silly sitting on a record (Although fully understandable of course) :wink:

I've thought about selling, but just can't do it (yet). I do so when I haven't played my records for a while because of being busy with other things (Family, work etc). I wonder if I would miss them after not playing them for (what seems) so long. Then one evening I whack on a tune, then another, then another....It then makes complete sense NOT TO SELL! 

Hope that helps :D

All the best,

Len :thumbsup:

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Isn't it the same as it always was? that people will want to cherry pick your collection for the best bits and leave you with the 95% that has become very hard and time consuming to sell, that is unless you have a collection that's all big time classic oldies & top rarities which owe you absolutely nowt because you bought them off the bowl list for £2-£8 years ago.
In the past every time (except the mid to later 80's) people have said words to the effect of " Sell Sell !!! You'll never see prices this high ever again", a few years later those prices are overtaken by leaps and bounds. My guess, and that's all any one has to offer are guesses, is that prices will continue to rise and rise for 5 -10 years at least, and maybe longer. Even when a few in demand records turn up in the states many are G condition, so if you have a half decent collection in decent condition it will grow by a third in the next 4/5 years, based on whats happened recently, so if you reckon your best bits might fetch £30,000 today you have to ask yourself " Do I want £30,000 today, or would I rather have £40,000 in a few years down the line"
Your call

hth

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Always a difficult decision to make - historically there have been very few times when it has been prudent to sell from a price/value point of view - the 80's lull so to speak being the exception.

The advent of the internet and it's world wide reach has done away with the dealer speak doom and gloom that they were all guilty of back in the past, 'no demand mate' was the stock in trade of the guilty robber barons, so valuation and demand info are readily available for a few clicks - this site alone shows that it is possible to sell all values of sounds in fairly short order without commission charges. Condition, demand, rarity - numerous ways to get this info. will play a big part in being successful.

ebay, dealer listings, discogs, sales history all available so not going out much any more should not inhibit making an informed decision, and I presume you must have some mates who can add to the pool of knowledge needed to make the decision.

The final criteria is down to you - retirement / illness / mortgage / financial / family commitments all have a bearing.

As others have already mentioned, the overall quality of your collection will decide the final value - big ticket numbers have always been saleable - a collection of soul pack fillers and boots, re-issues, carvers and the like will have a lot less value than you think, and some may be deemed worthless commercially - the secret is to become informed and be realistic on your valuation.

Do you want or need the money is always a significant driver of this decision, and if you do decide to sell don't then beat yourself up having started the process. Don't just piss it up the wall, have the holiday of a lifetime, buy a new car/kitchen/house because unless you're single the old saying is so true - happy wife, happy life less strife.

Best of luck

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Sell the expensive ones then replace them with some cheaper ones you like, that way you still have some tunes and some money. 

If a record is rare on 45 but cheap on lp sell the 45 and get the album.

Dare I say sell original oldies and replace with 5 quid boots from eBay so you can still hear them on vinyl. 

If you don't dj and just listen at home does it matter if you downgrade a few and have the cash as well 

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5 hours ago, neal bull said:

Never know if it’s the right time to sell up,

are there still collectors out there, is there demand,

do people still appreciate good quality tunes.?

not sure as I don’t go to many soul nights etc now.

Ay up my mate 

I sold up in the 90’s and have built a very modest collection almost from scratch again. Only buy things that I like and some bits that have some personal nostalgia attached to them. Mainly have crossover/70s or 80’s bits with a smattering of oldies - Gil Blanding, The Blue Sharks etc. 

Currrntly toying with the idea of selling up again - not because I need the money, more because I just shove them in boxes! Having said that I’m too fecking lazy to be arsed in going through all the rigmarole of selling! 

Pete 

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I sold up when I stopped DJ, in . Made a very nice profit.  Regret it.  Definitely.  Unfortunately  some of the records meant a great deal personally and where rare enough to be almost impossible to replace,  especially the ones with the autographs of the artists who kindly dedicated them to me and are sadly no longer with us. 

I've bought a few dozen over the last few years.  Non of the bigger ticket items that i used to own because I just can't bring myself to pay the current asking prices 

Steve 

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4 minutes ago, staceys dad said:

always thought i was gonna sell up at the age of 60...so will have a think about in dec when the magic birthday comes around...not the greatest collection in the world,but its the memories with most of the records..having started when i was 15-16 ish..

Memories they will be our undoing .I dont have much of a collection but its like a photo album to me I am 61 most of my stuff is from the early days and reminds me of people, places and happy times .

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The trouble with the term 'Golden Age' is you can't tell when it was until it's over,

 

That being said, 'Everything's for sale if the price is right'

so advice would be, put everything up on Discogs (its free to list) at the price you want  (sellers fees,average price,taken into account) sit back & watch what happens,:wicked:

either re-invest in more vinyl or spend, spend, spend

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1 hour ago, Winsford Soul said:

I sold up when I stopped DJ, in . Made a very nice profit.  Regret it.  Definitely.  Unfortunately  some of the records meant a great deal personally and where rare enough to be almost impossible to replace,  especially the ones with the autographs of the artists who kindly dedicated them to me and are sadly no longer with us. 

I've bought a few dozen over the last few years.  Non of the bigger ticket items that i used to own because I just can't bring myself to pay the current asking prices 

Steve 

hiya are there any particular ones you miss most? just curious

on topic I wouldn't unless it was a necessary step i.e. really needed the money or didn't like the records

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12 minutes ago, shufflin said:

hiya are there any particular ones you miss most? just curious

on topic I wouldn't unless it was a necessary step i.e. really needed the money or didn't like the records

Ordinary Joe. Signed and dedicated to me by Terry Callier.  Marcia Hines. You gotta let go. Wizard 7". Larry Allen. Can't we talk it over Green Dolphin from Ste Whittle.   Night Owl.  Signed and dedicated to me by Bobby Paris. Artistics. I'm gonna miss you. Coral from Keith Brady . Seven Souls. I still love you. Okeh. Just a few of plenty 

Steve 

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It is a good time to sell up!  There is a lot of dormant collections just sitting in cupboards,that the owners can’t bring themselves sell at the moment, keeping them just for old times sake!

Get in there, before more and more collections come onto the market, the prices will drop. Supply and demand!

As for me, I’m looking forward to it, as records from the USA are drying up. Maybe have a chance at getting more records for my collection!

 

Edited by solidsoul

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I've 'sold up' a few times. Depends what you've got  but in my experience you never see whatever you value the whole collection at. You can sell the whole lot or do it piece by piece. Both ways, the money is never as much as you expect and if you do it the latter way, it's a lot of work and ends up coming through in dribs and drabs so you don't really notice it so much. 

I also always used to think I could get things back for cheap, which you could at one time, but that's long gone now thanks to the internet. Wouldn't do it right now unless absolutely desperate for cash!

 

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When I was collecting properly I was constantly buying and selling.

 

there was no way I could afford to just buy.

 

i don’t buy anymore and slowly sell but I will always have some form of collection.

 

but selling had got me digging through and listening to records that have been boxed away for some time.  It’s been good but it is time consuming.

 

Prices would need to crash to get me buying again.

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On ‎2‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 12:15, solidsoul said:

It is a good time to sell up!  There is a lot of dormant collections just sitting in cupboards,that the owners can’t bring themselves sell at the moment, keeping them just for old times sake!

Get in there, before more and more collections come onto the market, the prices will drop. Supply and demand!

As for me, I’m looking forward to it, as records from the USA are drying up. Maybe have a chance at getting more records for my collection!

 

I totally agree, I never give up on the idea of collecting again, just not today's prices, but tomorrow's?

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On 2/20/2018 at 19:02, staceys dad said:

always thought i was gonna sell up at the age of 60...so will have a think about in dec when the magic birthday comes around...not the greatest collection in the world,but its the memories with most of the records..having started when i was 15-16 ish..

Do you need the money Kev? If not, then why sell up?

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no disrespect to the thread or comments ,but i,ve moved a few big cheese items on at going prices to date because i was offered a fair price,and offered to buyers on there wants list fabulous tunes ,only to be told by potential buyers  ..way out of my league ..does everyone expect to get rare 45,s for prices that were the going price 10 to 15  years ago...there are no cheap rare 45,s out there anymore ...dont ask for rare 45,s without thinking it through that the going rate will have to be met..here or in the states ...everything has its price its up to the buyers to put there money up or go without. i repeat do buyers expect to get rare valuable records for prices 10 to 15 years ago.....i can,t find them so why should i sell great 45,s cheap...example i was asked to sell my sandi sheldon mint okeh demo and he couldn,t understand why i laughed and didn,t reply at his going rate value of £600....i was told thats the price whats wrong with you ?i didn,t reply.....lets get real ...please.

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3 hours ago, solidsoul said:

You had all the soul 45’s in the USA, and most US public/ record dealers did not care about, or rate them at all!

It’s only when they started going for big money did they become interesting!

If it wasn’t for the long lasting UK Northern Soul scene it would still be that way!

In addition to being off-topic, that is a really tired argument. 

I think all Matt was trying to address is that there are some people out there that won't sell to anyone outside of England, which is something I've encountered on here before, and I think is strange.

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1 minute ago, Nick Soule said:

In addition to being off-topic, that is a really tired argument. 

I think all Matt was trying to address is that there are some people out there that won't sell to anyone outside of England, which is something I've encountered on here before, and I think is strange.

I dont think that is malicious just that some sellers dont want any risk or perceived risk.

 

if an item goes missing it would create a lot of bad feeling and all the hassle of having to sort the situation out.  And some of these record deals are getting very expensive.

 

some people feel happier only selling in country they live in.  I dont think this is exclusive to us brits i bet some stateside sellers are the same.

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Which country first created demand and price increases for group soul and sweet soul ?

 

the lowrider scene which i believe started in the states has seen several easy to pick up 10 dollar records now become hard to find 3 figure records.

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On 20/02/2018 at 13:06, neal bull said:

Never know if it’s the right time to sell up,

are there still collectors out there, is there demand,

do people still appreciate good quality tunes.?

not sure as I don’t go to many soul nights etc now.

I think people are more appreciative now than ever before tastes have matured and people have more knowledge and experience.

 

what is your idea of a quality tune ? 

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18 minutes ago, dylan said:

I dont think that is malicious just that some sellers dont want any risk or perceived risk.

 

if an item goes missing it would create a lot of bad feeling and all the hassle of having to sort the situation out.  And some of these record deals are getting very expensive.

 

some people feel happier only selling in country they live in.  I dont think this is exclusive to us brits i bet some stateside sellers are the same.

This is very true, I've encountered many U.S sellers who while advertising their record as Northern soul (a unique British term that has nothing to do with America) but refuse to ship to the U.K.

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3 hours ago, dylan said:

Which country first created demand and price increases for group soul and sweet soul ?

 

the lowrider scene which i believe started in the states has seen several easy to pick up 10 dollar records now become hard to find 3 figure records.

I hear this lowrider scene being accredited to the price increase in group and sweet soul all the time, but that is far from the truth. I could quote finishing prices of that genre on american auctions prior to ebay really getting going and I can assure you the titles I failed to win went to Japan and in some cases for just as much as they fetch now, well over $500. Sure, after the yen when tits up 2001 ish they went a little slower, and I only recall a few of the older low rider collectors prepared to spend big money. Most of the big bucks being spent on the west coast at present is with younger guys who had little clue when the money was being spent in Japan back then. Mid 2000 was the best time to buy Sweet soul, or when it came out!.

 

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28 minutes ago, still diggin said:

I hear this lowrider scene being accredited to the price increase in group and sweet soul all the time, but that is far from the truth. I could quote finishing prices of that genre on american auctions prior to ebay really getting going and I can assure you the titles I failed to win went to Japan and in some cases for just as much as they fetch now, well over $500. Sure, after the yen when tits up 2001 ish they went a little slower, and I only recall a few of the older low rider collectors prepared to spend big money. Most of the big bucks being spent on the west coast at present is with younger guys who had little clue when the money was being spent in Japan back then. Mid 2000 was the best time to buy Sweet soul, or when it came out!.

 

Yes I am well aware of the collectors in Japan and there fantastic level of knowledge.

 

i would say they were buying sweet and deep soul pretty much since it was made.

 

didnt John Anderson compile deep soul lists specifically for that market ?

 

but my point stands it wasn’t demand from Japan that saw records like the webs on popside go on to become fairly big money records.  And yes they are a new generation coming through along with some who have been around a long time.

 

i don’t think my low rider comment is aimed at records that were already in high demand and prized rarities more the next wave of 45s that were always more readily available.

 

some of those big money sides may also have demand from funk collectors for the other side e.g innersouls 

Edited by dylan

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2 hours ago, shufflin said:

NS records are now a global thing, I don't think prices will ever settle back down, esp. top 500 stuff

So in 20 years time when a lot of us are dead and the others have one foot in, where will the demand come from to keep prices high?

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13 hours ago, Steve L said:

So in 20 years time when a lot of us are dead and the others have one foot in, where will the demand come from to keep prices high?

I know younger ones who are collecting, people in EU are buying rare records (EU scene is younger generally), Japan, US ??

I think people have been predicting a price crash for donkey's years and it's never happened (still regret not picking up 'Jeanette' for cheap cos I thought £50 was expensive)

Don't get me wrong I'd love to see more sensible prices it's crazy what some vinyl is going for

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35 minutes ago, shufflin said:

I know younger ones who are collecting, people in EU are buying rare records (EU scene is younger generally), Japan, US ??

I think people have been predicting a price crash for donkey's years and it's never happened (still regret not picking up 'Jeanette' for cheap cos I thought £50 was expensive)

Don't get me wrong I'd love to see more sensible prices it's crazy what some vinyl is going for

There was certainly a good healthy number of younger european collectors late 90s early 2000s but they are all 20 years older now.

 

when do you stop being young :D

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39 minutes ago, shufflin said:

 

I think people have been predicting a price crash for donkey's years and it's never happened (still regret not picking up 'Jeanette' for cheap cos I thought £50 was expensive)

 

I was offered two of a kind and advised this is the one you should get by him.

 

i left it in the box but maybe should have gone for it.....

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3 hours ago, shufflin said:

I know younger ones who are collecting, people in EU are buying rare records (EU scene is younger generally), Japan, US ??

I think people have been predicting a price crash for donkey's years and it's never happened (still regret not picking up 'Jeanette' for cheap cos I thought £50 was expensive)

Don't get me wrong I'd love to see more sensible prices it's crazy what some vinyl is going for

I just don't think the numbers will be there to replace us old uns. Fewer collectors will mean less demand and inevitably lower prices

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1 hour ago, Steve L said:

I just don't think the numbers will be there to replace us old uns. Fewer collectors will mean less demand and inevitably lower prices

For me,my record collection is like a photo album,full of memories of how and when I got them.so as far as I’m concerned there will never be a right time to sell them. 

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"People will always want Rare Vinyl".

"Loads of Kids are coming through so prices will never drop".

"Sub Saharan Africa is Massive on Northern Soul and Collectors will pay Big money for years to come"

"Collectors will still want my records even when they are sat in their care homes wondering where the smell of pi55 is coming from"

ostrich-head-in-sand.jpg

Edited by Zed1

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5 hours ago, shufflin said:

I know younger ones who are collecting, people in EU are buying rare records (EU scene is younger generally), Japan, US ??

I think people have been predicting a price crash for donkey's years and it's never happened (still regret not picking up 'Jeanette' for cheap cos I thought £50 was expensive)

 

Jeanette.  £50. Still at least  £30 overpriced 

Steve 

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3 hours ago, Winsford Soul said:

Jeanette.  £50. Still at least  £30 overpriced 

Steve 

Just remember some one selling a collection to buy a new car it would of brought a house these days

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The prices of the best tunes will continue to rise in the decades ahead. Given that we’re talking about the best music on the planet, that shouldn’t come as a surprise. The English speaking world will stumble across some of the better tunes sooner or later - even those who don’t speak much English will come across common releases and be impressed by them. As the world’s population heads towards 8 billion, it will only take a few dozen buyers to influence the market - not hard to appreciate as there were over 80 people following last night’s Record Jungle auction that realised another set of huge winning bids.

If you keep hold of your records, their value will appreciate in years to come. By all means sell the odd record to fund some expense, but try to keep what’s precious to you. There are compelling reasons to sell a collection, but if you can hold on to the best bits, you won’t regret it.

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3 hours ago, Winsford Soul said:

Jeanette.  £50. Still at least  £30 overpriced 

Steve 

but recently sold for over a grand, not saying it's worth it (sick of hearing it tbh) but goes to prove the point doesn't it?

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1 hour ago, FRANKIE CROCKER said:

The prices of the best tunes will continue to rise in the decades ahead. Given that we’re talking about the best music on the planet, that shouldn’t come as a surprise. The English speaking world will stumble across some of the better tunes sooner or later - even those who don’t speak much English will come across common releases and be impressed by them. As the world’s population heads towards 8 billion, it will only take a few dozen buyers to influence the market - not hard to appreciate as there were over 80 people following last night’s Record Jungle auction that realised another set of huge winning bids.

If you keep hold of your records, their value will appreciate in years to come. By all means sell the odd record to fund some expense, but try to keep what’s precious to you. There are compelling reasons to sell a collection, but if you can hold on to the best bits, you won’t regret it.

Wouldn't be too sure about this. When I first started collecting rare soul in the early 80s, I used to part fund it by finding like, Bill Haley records and rock n roll records on London American in junk shops and selling them on. Believe it or not those were the most generally collectable and sellable  records going in those days. You'd find northern records cheap in second hand record shops all the time but never easily-available 1950s records which ageing rockers would pay top dollar for. You can't give those records away now, of course! 

Nowadays, I see loads and loads of records on sale for £100 or more that used to be a tenner in every single box at every single allnighter. Or you look on Discogs and there's like 10-15 copies available at stupid prices...I can't see how this is sustainable..

If we're talking about 'rare' , I'd say UK psych / freakbeat records are the rarest, I am 53 now and have been going through old records constantly since I was 17, buying everything that looked odd or different. I've picked up loads of Northern that way but never had a single one that is now sought after by  collectors of that sound.. 

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12 hours ago, JoeSoap said:

Wouldn't be too sure about this. When I first started collecting rare soul in the early 80s, I used to part fund it by finding like, Bill Haley records and rock n roll records on London American in junk shops and selling them on. Believe it or not those were the most generally collectable and sellable  records going in those days. You'd find northern records cheap in second hand record shops all the time but never easily-available 1950s records which ageing rockers would pay top dollar for. You can't give those records away now, of course! 

Nowadays, I see loads and loads of records on sale for £100 or more that used to be a tenner in every single box at every single allnighter. Or you look on Discogs and there's like 10-15 copies available at stupid prices...I can't see how this is sustainable..

If we're talking about 'rare' , I'd say UK psych / freakbeat records are the rarest, I am 53 now and have been going through old records constantly since I was 17, buying everything that looked odd or different. I've picked up loads of Northern that way but never had a single one that is now sought after by  collectors of that sound.. 

good points, I guess the big risk is as you say changing tastes over time, so something £2K now that becomes seen as sounding dated in the future would drop in price I'd imagine, some of the rare R&B sounding stuff might not age well

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On 27/02/2018 at 00:59, JoeSoap said:

Wouldn't be too sure about this. When I first started collecting rare soul in the early 80s, I used to part fund it by finding like, Bill Haley records and rock n roll records on London American in junk shops and selling them on. Believe it or not those were the most generally collectable and sellable  records going in those days. You'd find northern records cheap in second hand record shops all the time but never easily-available 1950s records which ageing rockers would pay top dollar for. You can't give those records away now, of course! 

Nowadays, I see loads and loads of records on sale for £100 or more that used to be a tenner in every single box at every single allnighter. Or you look on Discogs and there's like 10-15 copies available at stupid prices...I can't see how this is sustainable..

If we're talking about 'rare' , I'd say UK psych / freakbeat records are the rarest, I am 53 now and have been going through old records constantly since I was 17, buying everything that looked odd or different. I've picked up loads of Northern that way but never had a single one that is now sought after by  collectors of that sound.. 

Some interesting points here. Rare Northern isn’t necessarily the same as good Northern so some records will be less in demand. The rich seam of USA releases continues to throw up overlooked gems whilst the British releases are pretty well known and in finite supply. Tastes change so the future may well see converts buying the cheap USA sounds that no one wants right now. Once Amazon owns the rights to all on-line music, the savvier listeners will embrace all genres on vinyl and especially the sort of music that we like.

Edited by FRANKIE CROCKER
typo

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6 hours ago, FRANKIE CROCKER said:

Some interesting points here. Rare Northen isn’t necessarily the same as good Northern so some records will be less in demand. The rich seam of USA releases continues to throw up overlooked gems whilst the British releases are pretty well known and in finite supply. Tastes change so the future may well see converts buying the cheap USA sounds that no one wants right now. Once Amazon owns the rights to all on-line music, the savvier listeners will embrace all genres on vinyl and especially the sort of music that we like.

Some good points here. You don't really have too look to far back to find tracks that were considered too fast, too slow, too available, to rnb, too soulful not soulful enough and a dozen other reasons that now get played.

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